Corydon Things to Do

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Best Rated Things to Do in Corydon

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    walking tour

    by davecallahan Updated Jun 26, 2007

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    Take a walking tour of historic Corydon. For $10, a knowledgeable guide will lead hourly tours (they actually take about 75 minutes) or you can see about half the sites in 45 minutes for free (some buildings are locked and need the tour guide's keys).

    Start at Walnut and Elm and the old Presbyterian church with its fine stained glass windows.
    West on Walnut to the court building (still in service). It is three stories and each level has some glass cases with town memorabilia and pictures.
    Back out on Walnut, go east a few steps to Farquar and head north two blocks to Elliot and go west to the North Bridge Dam and Cedar Glade. These are a few structures left of the original pioneer village.
    Carefully cross to the west side of route 337 and go south one block to High Street and go west to see the original Elm tree where the Indiana constitution was signed and the oldest house in Corydon (after the pioneer period).
    Back out to route 337 and go south one block to Walnut and west one block to Oak Street. Here you see the home of Thomas Posey (a son of George Washington). Also there is the newspaper office that has been in operation for 100 years and the county jail. Continue south on Oak and you pass the town hall, the Keller Building (Victorian architecture), the library and the Haywood Theatre.
    Head east on Chestnut one block, then south one block on route 337. On flag days, you can see the "Flags over Corydon" display at Poplar Street.
    Carefully cross route 337 and go north to Beaver Street. Stroll down Beaver and see the shops that are housed in buildings that are over 100 years old. Cross over Beaver to the center square (where the gazebo is) and stroll around the park over to the west side where you have the old capitol building. This building has documents, pictures and memorabilia commemorating when Corydon was the state capital.
    Walk to the east side of the park, north on Elm Street and you are back at the starting point.
    There is a gift shop in the Presbyterian church where you can get a souvenier.

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    Wyandotte Caves

    by davecallahan Updated Feb 18, 2007

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    Beautiful natural structures inside large cave rooms.

    These caves are not as extensive as the famous ones in Virginia but some of the formations are impressive. Little plaques have been placed by some of the forms which look like familiar objects or figures.
    The cave is well lit and the walkway is comfortable for most people (but there are some inclines to climb). Like most caves, it is damp and cool, so dress appropriately. The guide gives you infomation about how the caves were formed and the minerals and chemicals involved in the structures. The basic tour costs about $10 (2003 dollars).
    You can even schedule a real caving expedition (lighted helmet and pick and all) if you are so inclined (which we were not so inclined) and wish to pay the extra $15.

    And when you are back in the open air, you can stop in the gift shop to pick up an Indiana or spelunker momento

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    Squire Boone Caverns

    by davecallahan Written Jun 24, 2007

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    The tours for these caverns last one hour and begin at 10am, 12noon, 2pm and 4pm.
    Supposedly, at least the tour guide says, Danial Boone helped discover the caves.
    Stalagtites, stalagmites, underground streams and waterfalls, special lighting effects to see the phosphoresence in the limestones.

    The walk is about a mile and a half and there is a lot of standing and listening and it gets quite chilly so I hope you remember to bring a sweater (even in August). It cost about $10 and it is as good as any of the caves we have seen in Virginia or Pennsylvania. (they also sting you for parking...$3).

    The gift shop is a fantastic place to seem samples of gems and stones which you can buy.
    You can even sluice in a "stream" and see if you can find some valuable treasures.

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    Boone Village

    by davecallahan Written Jun 24, 2007

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    monument to Squire Boone

    A small "village" where you can see old-time activities and handicrafts.
    Candle-dipping (you can try that); making lye soap; cooking home-made fudge; a nature trail; pet and feed the farm animals; watch the Grist Mill in operation. The host/hostess and other participants are all dressed in period costumes and pretend it is in the 19th century.

    There is a picnic area and snack shop if you get hungry.
    The gift shop has a wide assortment of souveniers and a very nice selection of gems and stones.

    The cost is $10 for entry and $3 per car for parking.

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    Hayswood Nature Park

    by davecallahan Updated Jun 30, 2007

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    This is a very nice park with many facilities for the whole family.
    There are 3 walking trails (mostly paved but some gravel). There is a large playground with jungle gym, slides, swings on the interior hill of the park. Picnic tables are placed along the roadway that runs through the park. Two pavillions are available for larger groups.

    A stream/marsh is on the south side of the park where you can do some birdwatching (red tailed hawk, swallows, killdeer, sparrows, a mocking bird and a mixed assortment of wild and domestic ducks and geese).

    The park is a carry-out park which means anything you bring in you also carry out.
    The park was in great shape and we saw maintenance personnel and a security van in the hour we spent there. The park has varied terrain and some nice panoramic views that we enjoy as a rest spot on our travels.

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    Golf Shores Fun Center

    by davecallahan Written Jul 24, 2007

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    This is one of the few places for kids to have fun in the area. It is a miniature golf course with a video arcade center.

    The golf part is 18 holes in the blazing hot sun for about $5. The holes aren't up to PuttPutt standards of difficulty but they are challenging to little kids. After you baked in the sun for an hour you can go into the video arcade where it is air conditioned and they have a snack bar.
    While the kids are spending tokens in the arcade section you can have a latte and relax in the wifi internet access section.

    They cater to groups (our reunion had discount prices for this place) and for reserved parties (birthdays for example).

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    Constitutional Elm Memorial

    by sambarnett Updated Nov 17, 2002

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    A shell of its former self; under the shade of this once mighty tree on a hot June day in 1816 delegates wrote Indiana’s state constitution. According to records, the tree stood fifty feet tall, its branches 132 feet wide. When a disease struck the elm in the 1920s its limbs were sawed off and sold as souvenirs. The remaining trunk is preserved in a sandstone covering, constructed by the CCC and WPA during the Great Depression.

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    Battle of Corydon

    by sambarnett Updated Jan 13, 2003

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    An historical marker in front of the new courthouse gives an explanation of the only Civil War battle to take place on Indiana soil.
       On a somewhat humorous note, it is said that Confederate General John Hunt Morgan demanded $1000 from each mill owner, lest his mill be burned. Someone overpaid by $200 and Morgan promptly returned the extra.

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    Battle of Corydon

    by Toughluck Written Feb 2, 2012
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    The primary action of the battle takes place on the road south from town. On July 9, 1863, a force of 400 local militia and volunteers, led by Col. Lewis Jordan attempted to stop Col. John Hunt Morgan and 2,400 cavalry, just south of town. The Raiders surrounded the town and began shelling it.

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    Battle of Corydon (ridge line defense)

    by Toughluck Written Feb 2, 2012
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    On a ridge south of town, the local militia and volunteers attempted to halt Morgan's raiders in their tracks. Today, the site is a series of memorial with minimal information about the raid. It is a nice park if you're looking for a quiet place to let the kids run. Well shaded. Most of the monuments are memorials to individuals who are preserved local history of the battle. Little remains of historic significance.

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    O'Bannon Memorial

    by Toughluck Written Feb 2, 2012
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    Gov. Frank O'Bannon was a well liked governor and a member of a family with long public service to the state.

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