Indianapolis Off The Beaten Path

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Best Rated Off The Beaten Path in Indianapolis

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    Lockfield Gardens

    by sambarnett Written Jul 12, 2003

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    lockfield gardens

    One of the earliest federally-funded housing projects in the country. Lockfield Gardens was completed in 1936, with 748 apartments on 24 acres of land. For decades it was the center of black life in Indianapolis, and a model of how well public housing could work. After falling into degredation in the 1950s and '60s, the project was closed, a federal judging siting that they fostered segregation. Only a third of the buildings remain today, most were leveled in the 1980s to allow room for the expansion of the Indiana University-Purdue University at Indianapolis campus. After being remodeled into luxury condos, the apartments now mainly serve as student housing.

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    Scottish Rite Cathedral

    by sambarnett Updated Mar 31, 2003

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    scottish rite cathedral

    Constructed in 1927-29 by members of the Free and Accepted Masons, this Gothic cathedral and it's 212 foot tower stands tall on north side of Indy's downtown. According to Indiana: A New Historical Guide, "the architect designed the building using a basic measurement of 33 feet or multiples thereof, symbolizing Christ's time on earth, as well as the 33 Degrees of the Rite."

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    BEER IN A NICE NEIGHBORHOOD

    by gkitzmil Written Oct 27, 2003

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    I grew up within walking distance of this little community. Now it is known as a place to go for bars (especially bars for the young drink and pewk crowd) but also a few nice restaurants and antique shops....

    Tucked away in the old residential area is a great little brewpub with great beers.

    840 E. 65th Street

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    Side Trip: Exotic Feline Rescue Center

    by staindesign Written Oct 20, 2013

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    This pic doesn't do justice how huge this guy is!
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    The Exotic Feline Rescue Center is a truly hidden gem in Indiana. It's unfortunate that the rescue has to even exist bc people here believe it's a good idea to make money by breeding or getting these wild animals as pets. I personally think a domestic cat can be pretty demanding, not to mention a 150+ wild cat.

    There are 226 rescued cats living at the center currently. There are tours Tuesday-Sunday. $10 for adults & $7 for children. There are lions, tigers, leopards, bob cats, etc. The donations are critical for the up keep at the center. They are very fortunate that since the surrounding farmers are very supportive by donating their dead livestock to the center for fresh meat for the cats. We were told that it takes about 3,000lbs of fresh meat daily to feed all of the cats. The enclosures are a bit sad looking, don't expect to see a space designed like the zoos. It is not luxury, but the cats are treated well and are living where they are not abused any longer. Caging these cats can seem like abuse, but the abuse from taking them from their natural habitat has affected them where they wouldn't be able to survive in the wild now. It seems it is the best scenario at this point and hopefully people are receiving education from this place to help prevent continual abuse of these animals in our state and our country. A final note, you are so much closer to these huge cats then you ever would be at a zoo.

    Also, I'd like to mention the staff. They are very hard working and caring for these cats and their cause. The founder is a very humble man. He works hard along side the keepers and volunteers. I was honored to meet a person with such a big heart.

    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Eco-Tourism

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    Toll House - Michigan Road

    by Toughluck Updated Oct 16, 2007

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    Indiana Historical Bureau: ID#: 49.1961.3
    County: Marion
    Title: Toll House / Michigan Road

    Marker Text: Operated by Augusta Gravel Road Co., circa 1866-1892. First major state road, built in the 1830's, from the Ohio River to Lake Michigan.
    Credit Line: Erected by the National Society of Colonial Dames of America in the State of Indiana, 1961

    Directions: 4702 N. Michigan Road/US 421, Indianapolis.

    National Park Service Toll House National Register Site

    Related to:
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    Crown Hill Cemetery

    by Toughluck Updated Oct 16, 2007

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    Courtesy of HABS (DOI-NPS)

    Crown Hill
    Marker Text: Crown Hill Cemetery, founded in 1863, is the fourth largest cemetery in America. The history of Indiana and the United States is reflected in its monuments. Crown Hill is the only cemetery in the state listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

    THE PEOPLE OF CROWN HILL
    Over 185,000 burials at Crown Hill. The following is a sample of those buried here.
    Lyman S. Ayres, 1824-1896, Section 11, Lot 11 Founded L.S. Ayres department stores in 1874.
    James Baskett, 1904-1948, Section 37, Lot 602. Black actor, best known for role of Uncle Remus in Disney's song of the South.
    John Dillinger, 1903-1934, Section 44, Lot 94. Notorious bank robber during the depression era.
    Charles Fairbanks, 1852-1918, Section 24, Lot 3. U.S. Senator, 1897-1904, U.S. Vice President, 1905-1909. Fairbanks, Alaska is named after him.
    Dr. Richard J. Gatling, 1818-1903, Section 3, Lot 9. Inventor of the Gatling Gun.
    Benjamin Harrison, 1833-1901, Section 13, Lot 57. U.S. Senator, 23rd U.S. President 1889-1893.
    Thomas A. Hendricks, 1819-1885, Section 29, Lot 2. U.S. Senator, 1863-1869; Governor, 1873-1877, U.S. Vice President, 1885.
    Etheridge Knight, 1931-1991, Section 62, Lot 173. A leading Black poet of the 1970s and 80s
    Col. Eli Lilly, 1844-1898. Section 13, Lot 19. Founder of Eli Lilly & Company.
    Thomas Marshall, 1854-1925, Section 72, Lot 1. Governor 1909-1913; U.S. Vice President, 1913-1921.
    James Whitcomb Riley, 1849-1916, Section 61, Lot 1. Famous Hoosier Poet.
    Samuel St. George Rogers, 1832-1880. Section 3, Lot 22. Confederate soldier and congressman from Florida. Over 1,600 Confederate POWs are also buried at Crown Hill.
    Booth Tarkington, 1869-1946, Section 13, Lot 56. Author/playwright, winner of two Pulitzers.

    National Park Serivce Crown Hill Cemetery National Historic Register Site

    Related to:
    • Religious Travel
    • Historical Travel

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    Monument Circle: Circle of lights Tradition

    by staindesign Updated Dec 15, 2013

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    The monument lite up!

    The Festival of Lights is a yearly tradition. From 6-7pm is the preshow and then from 7-8pm is the actual show that is televised. At 7.50 the tree/monument is lite up, carrols are sang, and fireworks explode above. This city knows how to ring in Christmas. The crowds are large and it is best to arrive early and dress warm!

    It takes a lot to get the place decorated, more than 200 volunteer union electricians string 4,784 lights on 52 garland strands each 215 ft. long in November and then return in January to take them down. There are 6 huge lighted raindeer and about 25 lighted trees. Around the circle are 8ft. tall nutcracker soldiers and all of the trees are strung with lights. The surrounding buildings are light up with colored lights and in the windows they usually make an image of a green christmas tree.

    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • School Holidays
    • Festivals

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    Abandoned cemetery

    by GeneralTsao Written May 9, 2005

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    If you're the type that likes to explore cemeteries, there's one in Indy I happened upon.

    It's a small plot, right next to I-465 and E. Washington St.

    Its small size would imply a family plot, but the names are quite varied, so I don't think it's just family.

    Most of the markers (the ones that could be read) are around 100 years old or so.

    Dir: Exit on E. Washington, go W to traffic light. Turn left on S. Old Trail Rd. Follow 1/4 mile to cemetery on L.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Budget Travel
    • Road Trip

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    A stop back in time in Lockerbie Square

    by 807Wheaton Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Lockerbie Square

    In the shadow of downtown Indianapolis, Lockerbie Square with its quaint cottages stand side by side among an eclectic mix of Italiante, Federal and Queen Anne houses of one of the nation's most resurgent cities.
    James Whitcomb Riley spent the last two decades of his life here over a century ago.

    A dedicated group of "urban pioneers" led the neighborhood's revitalization. Restoration of houses came one by one with vacant lots filled with either historic homes relocated from other, endangered locations, or from "in-fill" construction carefully designed to blend in with the neighborhood's Victorian ambiance.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture

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    I love farmers markets!!!

    by staindesign Written Sep 27, 2006

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    Farmers Market at 62nd & Allisonville Rd.
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    To begin with, I think farmers markets are great! They give local people an opportunity to buy from local farmers. It is very important to support the local economy, why would want to buy corn from Iowa when there is plenty in Indiana? I have been to 2 here in Indianapolis, one at 62nd and Allisonville Rd. (open March-2nd wk. October) and the one downtown at City Market on Market St. (open Wednesdays: June-October). Right now it is fall and they have the craziest things, some of the gurds are just for decoration they told me. I was wondering because I wouldn't want to eat those, and i surely don't know how I would prepare it!

    Plus, this is a great opportunity to mingle with locals and buy some healthy food if you are on a budget travel!

    The link that I have included is to all of the farmers markets in Indiana with locations and open times.

    Related to:
    • Food and Dining
    • Family Travel
    • Budget Travel

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    Canterbury Arabian Horse Farm

    by djramey Written Feb 19, 2004

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    At this intruiging place, visitors can see some of Indiana's most beautiful horses, pet their manes, see the horses cleaned and showered in a wash rack, watch and learn how they are exercised, and take a walk through what some people consider one of the nicest horse barns in all of the country. The Canterbury Arabian Horse Farm holds over 50 of this distinct and beautiful bread. Their horses have a bulletin board full of show ribbons and have even sponsored famous companies like the Indianapolis Colts football team.

    Though you may not expect to see any high flying, state-of-the-art entertainment at the Canterbury Arabian Horse Farm, you will experience nature and its beasts at their best. The free admission is also a kicker because you might want to take your entire family. Ask for Flois or Debbie Burrow, the ranch owners, and they might be able to give you the tour themselves. It is truly a lovely location, and would be a great place to take a small trip for a couple hours. Great photo opportunities and great experiences can be had at the Canterbury Arabian Horse Farm.

    Just a quick bustle from downtown to north of Noblesville will get you there. The farm is located at 12131 East 196th Street. Or use the information below to contact before leaving.

    Related to:
    • Budget Travel
    • Family Travel
    • Horse Riding

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    Canal Walk. Walking along the...

    by Scottyj36 Written Sep 7, 2002

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    Canal Walk. Walking along the canal with lovley trees, especialy nice in the fall when the leaves change. Drive up Martin Luther King DR to 42nd ST. Just past the Christian Theological Seminary are a few bridges, park off the side of the road...

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    The Monon Trail. It used to be...

    by descolada99 Written Aug 26, 2002

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    The Monon Trail. It used to be an old railroad that went north-south through the city, but ahas now been converted toa beautiful walking/biking trail. It's been extended north to Carmel, and it goes south through Broadripple and on down. It also connects to the Central Canal Towpath greenway, which used to be the towpath of animals pulling boats through the canal (connects in Broadripple). Using these two trails, you can bike/skate/walk all the way from Carmel (northside suburb) to downtown Indy.

    The best place to get on is near what used to be the nroth trailhead (before it was extended further north to Carmel) at 91st street just east of Meridian (state road 31) on the north side.

    Go to http://www.indygreenways.org/monon/monon.htm for more info, although it hasn't beenupdated with the new northside extension yet.

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    Bloomington, IN - If you are...

    by djramey Written Aug 26, 2002

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    Bloomington, IN - If you are interested in a jaunt out of the city of Indianapolis for a day, why not look south to the home of the Hoosiers - Indiana University. Indiana's best-known university is renowned for it's schools of Music and Theatre, as well as the traditions of Indiana. The state of Indiana is known as the home of basketball, and there is no other place in the world that holds this tradition than Bloomington. You will also find productions from many styles of music and acting. Only a 45-minute drive from I-465 on Highway 37, Bloomington boasts some of the most beautiful scenery in the state. During the fall months you will find possibly the most beautiful array of leaves and tree colors anywhere in the United States. When in Bloomington, check out Kirkwood Avenue on the heart of the Indiana Campus. Kirkwood is the Mecca of Bloomington’s artists, shoppers, drinkers, and partiers. The students of IU are proud of their school, and most chose it because of its rich traditions. Bloomington is a place you will not want to miss when traveling to Indiana, and that's a promise.

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    Ride the Fair Train!The...

    by Boozoo Written Aug 25, 2002

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    Ride the Fair Train!

    The Indiana Transporation Museum is an interesting destination in itself, but they also operate an annual train ride between Noblesville and the State Fair (mid to late August). It only costs around 6$/person and it sure is a lot more fun than driving down there and parking in the monster crowds at the fairgrounds! In addition to the fair train, they sporadically make runs to area restaurants and for other special events. Follow the link above for more information including schedules.

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Indianapolis Off The Beaten Path

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