Fun things to do in Indianapolis

  • Indianapolis Soldiers and Sailors Memoria
    Indianapolis Soldiers and Sailors...
    by atufft
  • The mall stretches from the War Memorial to right
    The mall stretches from the War Memorial...
    by mtncorg
  • Wintry view from atop Crown Hill
    Wintry view from atop Crown Hill
    by mtncorg

Most Viewed Things to Do in Indianapolis

  • deecat's Profile Photo

    Colonel Eli Lilly Civil War Museum

    by deecat Updated Apr 11, 2005

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    One of Jill's favorite sites on our trip to Indianapolis was the Colonel Eli Lilly Civil War Museum on street level at the Soldiers & Sailors Monument. Here is what she wrote about it:

    "The bottom of the Soldiers & Sailors Monument conceals a Civil War Museum free to the public.
    This nicely organized area squeezes into a small space the soldier's experience from home to training camp to battle and death or return. The exhibit provides a satisfying mixture of video re-enactment and real artifacts (especially identified carte de visite style soldier photos).
    The museum has few interactive elements other than the videos, so is not geared toward young children, but the history or Civil War buff will want to spend time here.
    I especially liked the Regimental flags displayed. And, the walk over loose boards to the sound of marching feet from the video on the wall gave credence to the miles covered by the Civil War Soldier"

    There are two interactive computers that allow one to trace the path of a letter sent from the battlefield to a loved one on the homefront. We did not see any, but occasionally, a civilian reenactor will help explain the Indiana homefront perspective of the war.

    There are 9 large-scale video sceens within this small area that show live reenactments of historical battles & common events during the Civil War

    Both the Soldiers & Sailors Monument and Colonel Eli Lilly Civil War Museum pay tribute to the thousands of Hoosiers who sacrificed to support the Union cause. What a wonderful place to learn, to reflect, and to "experience" one of the most memorable times in our history.

    I have no picture of the museum, but here is a POST CARD of the monument where it resides.

    Soldier & Sailor Monument with Civil War Museum
    Related to:
    • Museum Visits
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • deecat's Profile Photo

    Indiana World War Memorial

    by deecat Updated Apr 11, 2005

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Jill and I stood in awe of the Indiana World War Memorial building. It is magnificent.
    Work began on the main Memorial building in 1927, but it was not complete until 1965 because they had to wait until 2 churches that were on that block were demolished.

    Jill and I think this structure is a "gem" and resembles the original Mausoleum (Tomb of King Mausollus) and one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World!)

    The Memorial Building sits on a block that is raised above street level; that only makes it more impressive. It rises 210 feet above street level. If you go to Vermont Street, you can enter by a single, monumental stairway rising directly from the sidewalk. If you go from Michigan Street, there is a low, wide granite/limestone stairway that leads to a pair of end stairways that rise in two runs.

    We loved the six columns and the stepped pyramidal roof topped by a lantern. Each side has six columns, and above the columns is a "frieze" with 6 large figures that represent: Courage, Memory, Peace, Victory, Liberty, & Patriotism. It has an Egyptian "feel" to it. And don't miss the beautiful tall, double leaf bronze doors, a standout!

    If you walk from the southwest corner of the block along Vermont Street, you will see the south steps that face University Park and the statue called Pro Patria. The title is Latin and means "for country." The statue is a young man standing on a pink granite base. He is draped in an American flag and is reaching heavenward. In 1929 it was considered one of the largest sculptured bronze casting ever made in America.

    We were glad that we did not have to climb all those stairs to get inside. We went to the other side, and it was an easy entry.

    Be sure to read the next tip which will describe the inside of this beautiful Indiana World War Memorial

    Indiana World War Memorial
    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture
    • Museum Visits

    Was this review helpful?

  • deecat's Profile Photo

    Veteran's Memorial Plaza (Obelisk Square)

    by deecat Updated Apr 11, 2005

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The day we saw Veteran's Memorial Plaza (Obelisk Square), it was cloudy and cool. The photograph almost looks as though it is a black and white picture. I took it from a distance because when we were there, they were renovating this area, and there was a fence blocking the way.

    The reason for the two names is that the Veteran's Memorial Plaza was once known as Obelisk Square. It was completed in 1930 and the park was almost completely paved with asphalt so large gatherings of people could come together. In 1975, it was relandscaped with a formal pavement pattern that radiates from the central Obelisk fountain. This was done for the Bicentennial of the Declaration of Independence.

    I'm glad that they added grassy areas and trees at the four corners. I'm sure it is much more inviting with natural elements rather than asphalt!

    In the center of this Plaza is the Obelisk Fountain. The Obelisk is made of Berwick black granite with bronze tablets at its base and is 100 foot tall. The obelisk is a symbol of regeneration; propeganda says that it represents "the hopes and aspirations of the nation, a symbol of the power of nature to reproduce and continue the life of the country". The tablets are sculpted to represent the 4 fundamentals on which the nation's hopes are founded: law, science, religion, & education.

    The fountain is composed of pink Georgia marble and terrazzo. It's a 2-level fountain; the lower basin is 100 feet in diameter. The upper basin is made up of four small bays with a large nozzle and spray ring in each. At night the fountain is illuminated with colored lights.

    I only wish we could have gotten closer, but the construction prevented that!

    Veteran's Memorial Plaza
    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture
    • Museum Visits

    Was this review helpful?

  • deecat's Profile Photo

    Crown Hill Cemetery In Indianapolis, Indiana

    by deecat Written Apr 12, 2005

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Crown Hill Cemetery is one of the largest cemeteries in the United states with several lovely High Victorian Structures on its park-lined grounds. I found the Gothic Gateway (see photo) particularly handsome. It was designed by Indianapolis architect, Adolf Scherrer. He also designed the Romanesque Revival Waiting Station (see Travelogue).

    Many famous people are buried here such as President Benjamin Harrison; 3 Vice-presidents, Charles Fairbanks, Thomas Hendricks, and Marshall Thomas; Col Eli Lilly; Indiana Civil War Governor, Oliver Morton; Richard Gatling who invented the Gatling machine gun; James Whitcomb Riley, famous Hoosier poet; Booth Tarkington, author; and John Dillinger, bank robber.

    Jill and I took a guided tour of this 200-year-old cemetery one beautiful Sunday afternoon in April, 2005. It's so large that it is on both sides of 38th Street with a crossing via a tunnel.

    It's name comes from the actual hill crown that rises to the highest point in the cemetery and the county! That is where James Whitcomb Riley is buried in the middle of this crown. It is a place with grand vistas.

    There's an orphans' lot and a Confederate soldiers' lot as well as a huge area for Union soldiers.

    Our tour was called the "Heritage" and is the most popular of all the tours. It presented the history of the cemetery and took us to interesting people's graves. We saw a variety of monuments and statues. It lasted about one hour and forty-five minutes and covered over one mile. It cost $5.00.

    This cemetery has a Peace Chapel, Garden Mausoleums, and the new Pine Mausoleum. We saw the National Cemetery (within the Crown Hill Cemetery) that is dedicated to those who served the country.

    Almost 200,00 citizens are buried here. Of all the things I saw in Indianapolis, The Crown Hill Cemetery had the greatest impact on me personally.

    Crown Hill Cemetery
    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • deecat's Profile Photo

    American Legion Mall

    by deecat Updated Apr 19, 2005

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    American Legion Mall is huge; it stretches for 2 blocks & is the newest, biggest, & most contemporary on the Indiana War Memorial Plaza. I enjoyed the vast space & open feeling.
    I took an upclose photo at the Vietnam segment; it did not turn out. It is so "moving" with a "twin" segment on the Korean War. The two structures are each segments of a 12 & a half foot diameter, 25-foot tall cylinder. One side has engraved into it the names of the wars, & excerpts of letters written from soldiers to family & friends at home.
    Indianapolis architect Patrick Brunner designed them out of limestone & granite.

    The Vietnam segment is larger than the Korean because of all the people killed or missing in action. It says that 1,525 Hoosiers were killed in the Vietnam War & 927 Hoosiers were killed during the Korean War.

    I had a lump in my throat as I read the poignant letters, knowing that these young men & women are now dead.

    North of the Korean Section is the newest structure, the World War II Memorial. It is similar to both the Korean & Vietnam memorials. However, it is the 1st memorial on the Plaza to truly be a half-circle It is larger than the others because the war was larger. World War II was responsible for one-half million American deaths & half a million were wounded. Indiana lost about 12,000; 17,000 wounded.
    It, too, has all the names of the dead engraved & soldier's letters. Unique to this Memorial is a free-standing column on the concave side listing the order of campaigns & operations..

    Also at the American Legion Mall is the American Legion National Headquarters as shown in the photo, the Cenotaph Square (see tip), and a beautiful building called Building "B" 1925.

    At the northern most end of the Historic district is the Marion County Public Library with its classic Greek Doric architectural design (1913-16) & made of Bedford, Indiana, limestone, but it is completely under construction at this time.

    American Legion National Headquarters
    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture
    • Arts and Culture

    Was this review helpful?

  • deecat's Profile Photo

    Interior of the Indiana World War Memorial

    by deecat Updated Apr 19, 2005

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Originally built to honor Hoosiers in World War I, it has since been rededicated for World War II and other wars.

    Inside is just as breathtaking as the outside. It has 3 main floors, each equally beautiful. On the upper level is the incredible Shrine Room This room symbolizes peace and unity. It is made of materials from all over the world (symbolic that World War I was world wide in nature). They tell you that if you visit the Shine Room, you will leave with "a renewed sense of patriotism and an appreciation for the sacrifices of those who fought in the first World War." It does, indeed.

    The Main Floor houses exhibit space, offices, and two 75-seat meeting rooms. In addition, it also houses a 500 seat Pershing Auditorium. The public can use the two rooms and the auditorium for a nominal fee. Quite impressive is the list of names of all Hoosiers who participated in World War I & all Hoosiers killed or missing in action from World War II, Korea, and Vietnam. The enormity of these lists is quite sobering.

    On this main floor, we viewed an exhibit (photographic and commentary) concerning all the winners of the Medal of Honor. We spent a good deal of time here because it was so impressive...beautiful, bittersweet, and historic.

    On the Lower Level, there is a FREE Military Museum portraying the history of Indiana's veterans. There's a commission plate of the battleship U.S.S. Indiana, Military firearms, Korean War era helicopter, Mexican War cannon, a Navy Terrier Missile, & a Desert Storm Humvee.

    The use of marble, granite, brass, and gold leaf is really something. We commented that this structure would last forever!

    The photograph is of a green marble water fountain. I just could not resist taking a picture.

    Water Fountain Inside Indiana War Memorial
    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Museum Visits
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • deecat's Profile Photo

    The Scottish Rite Cathedral in Indianapolis

    by deecat Updated Apr 13, 2005

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Please see the TRAVELOGUE for the details & more detailed photographs

    We took a tour of The Scottish Rite Cathedral & found it fascinating & informative. I love the tours being small ( just Jill, the tour guide, & me). It's done by a member of the Scottish Rite who has volunteered.

    He told about the Gothic Tower (212 feet above the sidewalk); the 54 carillon bells; the 12 "fleur-de-lis atop the tower; the stone work around the doorways; the Tiler's Room at the Meridian Street entrance being a perfect cube; the Two-story Ballroom with its crystal chandelier; the Auditorium (Theater) for 1,100 people finished in carved curly Russian white oak paneling; the Organ with 7,000 pipes that come from 4 separate locations in the auditorium;& the Lounge with its two rows of columns 33 feet apart & spaced 16 1/2 feet on centers.

    He showed us the glorious Art Glass Windows; the lush carpets designed by the architect; the Jacobean Library with windows dedicated to Governor Winfield Durbin; the grand staircase that is 33 feet wide; & the two-story ballroom with a mezzanine on all four sides.

    He took us on the old, elaborate (clastrophobic) elevator. The tour guide also took us to the banquet hall that will seat over 2,500 people; its surrounded by a balcony which is a recreation room & the cafeteria. He also said that the members help troubled teens, bringing them here to tutor, etc.

    He pointed a room that is climate controlled where they keep the photographs of each class that graduates into the Scottish Rite. It was so great to be able to go back to those first classes & compare them to today's group.
    He finally told us that The Scottish Rite Cathedral cost $2,5000,000.00 in 1929 so you can imagine what it would cost today.

    Scottish Rite Cathedral
    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Arts and Culture
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • deecat's Profile Photo

    Indiana State Capitol

    by deecat Updated Apr 13, 2005

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    To schedule a tour, call (317)233-5293

    The Indiana State Capitol is a beautiful building, the historic treasure of Indianapolis and the state of Indiana.

    Competition for the design of the new State House was won by an Indianapolis architect, Edwin May. He made the building to be shaped like a Greek cross with a central dome and rotunda. The main floor is built 14 feet above ground level. The building is where the governor, the House of Representatives (east side), and the Senate (west side) do business as well as the Indiana Supreme Court (north end).

    The interior is in the Italian Renaissance style. Indiana materials such as Indiana Oak, maple, and walnut are used in the building.
    Skylights bring in natural lighting. The Atrium skylights brighten the north and south wings. The Art Glass inner dome, in blue tones, is suspended below a skylight.

    The exterior of the building is Corinthian style design. Indiana materials are used here, too. Oolitic limestone quarried from Monroe, Lawrence, & Owen counties; foundation limestone from Greensburg & North Vernon quarries; cornerstone limestone from Spencer, Indiana. So, the building is certainly representative of Indiana.

    Many "blotched" changes happened in the first 100 years so in 1988, an eleven million dollar renovation and restoration took place to bring back its original elegance. The biggest project with the best results (I think) was removing three layers of paint and doing "four acres of plaster hand stenciling". The results are breathtaking.
    The Indiana Supreme Court courtroom did not have to be restored because it has never changed.

    I must say that this revitalized Capitol Building called the "State House" represents nineteenth-century grandeur with the inner workings of a twenty-first-century.

    Indiana State Capitol
    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • deecat's Profile Photo

    University Park (University Square)

    by deecat Updated Apr 11, 2005

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Please click photo for details

    On a cool, cloudy day on April 1, 2005, Jill and I visited the University Park (University Square) in Indianapolis. Thank goodness it was warm enough for the fountain to be running.

    We discovered that this area is the oldest portion of the Indiana War Memorial Plaza and that the Indiana Legislature had set aside the city block (1821) for a UNIVERSITY! That plan never came to be; instead, the southwest corner of the park was home to the Marion County Seminary, the city's 1st high school, and several churches at different time periods and in the same building!. By 1860, they tore that building down so the park could be a drilling ground for the Union troops.

    When the war was over, citizens took up a fund to make a park, and it took 10 yearsto complete. Later, the park was redesigned as we see it today with a central circle with radiating diagonal concrete walkways.

    The centerpiece of the park is the Depew Fountain with its granite foundation. Karl Bitter designed it, but he died before it was done and so Alexander Stirling Calder completed it.
    It's dedicated to a physician from Indianapolis named Dr. Richard Johnson Depew.

    This is certainly an impressive fountain with a 2nd tier that is carved granite half-clam shells where the water flows. I loved the 8 dancing children holding hands made of bronze with a green patina finish. 16 jumping fish adorn the third tier, and the column in the center is carved with frog faces. The pinnacle of the fountain has a woman in a toga drape with a cymbal in each hand.

    University Park (University Square)
    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • deecat's Profile Photo

    Walk Central Canal Into White River State Park

    by deecat Written Apr 12, 2005

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    On Saturday afternoon, Apri 2, 2005, Jill and I were quite busy visiting a museum, the zoo, but we took time out to do the White River State Park which is an easy walk from downtown.

    First, we visited the Pumphouse Visitor Center which was build in 1870 (five years after the end of the Civil War. Go there to gather material, information, and maps. Then walk west (left) to the bridge that takes you over White River
    At the far end of the bridge to the right you will see the Zoo. Adjacent to the zoo is the White River Gardens Botanical Showcase that is open year round.

    Take the River Promenade, a 1/2 mile walkway made up of 1,200 blocks of Indiana limestone. 14 of these stones have carved renderings of famous buildings in the United States that are constructed of Indiana Limestone.

    You'll pass the NCAA Hall of Champions which you may wish to visit. You need to know that this is a new version of the Central Canal for strolling. The original one was built in 1836.
    Now, cross over the footbridge.

    The Congressional Medal of Honor Memorial with 27 curved walls of glass each between 7-10 feet high. These represent the conflicts in the world where the Congressional Medal was given. There are 410 medal winner's names and recorded stories.

    Next is the Eiteljorg Museum (Indian and South Western Art). See it in another tip.
    The Indiana State Museum is also here.

    A memorial to the U.S.S. Indianapolis (the legendary World War II flagship that was sunk by ta Japanese torpedo 2 weeks before the war ended) was dedicated in 1995 and is here too.

    This area is a 10 1/2 block area between 11th Street & Washington streets that has undergone a multimillion renovation and extended into the park.
    It's really quite beautiful.

    Pumphouse Visitor Center
    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Museum Visits
    • Arts and Culture

    Was this review helpful?

  • deecat's Profile Photo

    Statues Scattered Throughout University Park

    by deecat Updated Apr 11, 2005

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Once again, click on the photo

    Before leaving the University Park (University Square), make sure that you see all the statues scattered throughout.

    My photographs only show two. Not shown in the picture would be the Benjamin Harrison Statue 1908 located eastward along New York Street. This statue honors Indiana's & Indianapolis' only Presidet, Benjamin Harrison The statue is bronze and the remaining portions of the statue are limestone.

    In the photo on the left is the statue called Seated Lincoln Statue 1934 located at the southeast corner of the park. It is made of bronze and depicts Lincoln slumping in a chair with his right hand raised in a gesture of peace. He sits on his shawl that is draped over the chair. The artist, Henry Hering made the statue seem real by adding Lincoln's watch chain, gloves, and stovepipe hat.

    There's another state that depics Schuyler Colfax 1887 and is located a short stroll north on Pennsylvania Street from Lincoln statue. He was vice President under President Grant . This was the 1st statue in the park. This structure is 20 feet high and is made of granite.

    My photograph on the right is a small sculpture of Pan that is located directly east and west of the fountain. This and the Wood Nymph Statue are replicas because the originals were stolen years ago. Both once were drinking fountains.

    I wish we had seen all of these with more sunshine.

    Lincoln & Pan Statues in University Park
    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Arts and Culture
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • deecat's Profile Photo

    Sunken Garden/Cenotaph Square 1931

    by deecat Updated Apr 11, 2005

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    On a much brighter, warmer day, Jill and I ventured forth to view the beautiful American Legion Mall where we saw the Sunken Garden/Cenotaph Square 1931.

    Cenotaph Square was built as a tribute to Indiana's war dead, and the focal point is a rectangular, black granite cenotaph (a raised, empty tomb) that rests on a low green & red granite base. The base rests on a pavement of polished red & green granite squares. There is a bronze wreath with central star located on each of the east, west, & south sides of this pavement.

    There is an inscription on the tomb and a memorial on the north side to James Bethal Gresham of Evansville, Indiana, who was the 1st member to lose his life in World War I.
    The photo shows one of the four black granite columns with simple gold necking bands and gold eagles in place of capitals.

    South of here you are able to see a grass mall that extends to North Street. But, you can see all of the Plaza and the downtown Indianapolis skyline.

    Cenotaph Square
    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel
    • Arts and Culture

    Was this review helpful?

  • deecat's Profile Photo

    Take a Walk Through History at Lockerbie Square

    by deecat Updated Apr 14, 2005

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    See my Lockerbie Square Travelogue for more photos and information

    On a sunny Sunday afternoon in April of 2005, Jill and I did a self-guided tour of Lockerbie Square before taking a guided tour of the Riley Home in the area.

    This area is quite interesting because it is an eclectic mix of Queen Anne and Italianate, Federal, and Vernacular Cottages. From seeing this area, I am convinced that Indianapolis has made a firm commitment to preserving its historic past.

    Lockerbie Square is a residential district that was largely settled by German immigrants during the Civil War Boom. It was originally a working and middle class neighborhood.

    Indiana's poet, James Whitcomb Riley was inspired by the arching trees and flickering gaslights on Lockerbie Street, and he wrote:
    "Such a dear little street it is
    nestled away from the noise of the city
    and heat of the day
    In cool shady coverts of whispering trees."

    All the literature implies that Lockerbie Square is one of the country's great examples of "Victorian restorations".

    It was in the 1970s that Lockerbie Square saw a rebirth. The area had become a victim to urban blight and neglect. A group of dedicated people called "urban pioneers" began this neighborhood revitalization, and they were boosted by Lockerbie Square being included in the 1973 National Register of Historic Places.

    The really wonderful thing about this area besides the incredible architecture is that its location is just a walk from the city's core. We were quite impressed with it all.

    A Home in Historic Lockerbie Square
    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • deecat's Profile Photo

    First Stop in Indianapolis: The ArtsGarden

    by deecat Updated Apr 9, 2005

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    To gain a better view, please click the photographs

    The Indianapolis Artsgarden should be your first stop in downtown because it has much of the information that you will need to make your stay successful.

    It's erected over the intersection of Illinois and Washington streets adjacent to the Circle Centre Mall. It is dangling over one of downtown's busiest intersections, this glass-encased Artsgarden will provide fun viewing both inside and out.

    It is operated by the Arts Council of Indianapolis, and it is one of the city's newest arts venues. I think that it is an ideal place to discover local art happenings and to catch a free performance (if you are lucky).

    Since its 1995 opening, thousands of artists have performed or exhibited in the 12,5000-square-foot space. The structure is 128 feet in diameter, 20 feet above the ground, and it has 35,000 square feet of glass as it rises 80 feet into the air.

    Jill and I picked up needed maps and brochures as we enjoyed the beauty of this truly unique spot.

    Hours: Monday-Saturday 9-9
    Sunday 12-6

    My photographs show both the outside and inside view.

    Indianapolis Artsgarden
    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Arts and Culture

    Was this review helpful?

  • djramey's Profile Photo

    The Congressional Medal of Honor Memorial

    by djramey Updated Feb 23, 2004

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The highest award a United States Military man or woman can recieve is the Congressional Medal of Honor. This light blue and white neck-badge is awarded to those who have "performed an act of such conspicuous gallantry as to rise 'above and beyond the call of duty.'" Of all military personel since 1861, only 3,459 have been awarded, thus without saying it is an honor to receive such a prize.

    The memorial honors all of those who have won this prestigous award by placing their name, city, and state on a specific wall in this memorial. The memorial is located on the White River Canal Walk on the northern bank. A group of 27 curved glass walls between 7 and 10 feet make up the memorial which represent 15 conflicts the United States have been a part of. There is also a audio/visual display that allows visitors to listen and watch stories regarding their award. The memorial was dedicated on May 28, 1999, the last Memorial Day weekend of the 20th century.

    The Indianapolis memorial, is the only memorial in the United States that honors the most highly decorated and respected soldiers. There is no other Congressional Medal of Honor Memorial in the USA. Only around 3,500 soldiers have ever earned this award, more than half were awarded after death. The name of each recipient is marked into one of the 27 curved glass mountings. Visitors will walk through free of charge in one of the most beautiful areas in all of Indianapolis.

    Medal of Honor Memorial
    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Family Travel

    Was this review helpful?

Indianapolis Hotels

Latest Indianapolis Hotel Reviews

Caribbean Cove Hotel & Conference Center
Best (5.0 out of 5.0) 1 Review
Indianapolis - Days Inn Downtown
Great (4.0 out of 5.0) 1 Review
Crowne Plaza Indianapolis Downtown (Union Station)
Best (5.0 out of 5.0) 1 Review
Le Meridien Indianapolis
Great (4.0 out of 5.0) 2 Reviews
Hyatt Regency Indianapolis
Good (3.0 out of 5.0) 4 Reviews
Columbia Club
Best (5.0 out of 5.0) 1 Review
The Westin Indianapolis
1 Review
Comfort Inn West - Indianapolis
Terrible (1.0 out of 5.0) 1 Review
University Place Conference Center & Hotel Indianapolis
Best (5.0 out of 5.0) 1 Review
Hampton Inn Indianapolis Downtown
Great (4.0 out of 5.0) 2 Reviews
Extended StayAmerica Indianapolis-Airport
Good (3.0 out of 5.0) 1 Review

Instant Answers: Indianapolis

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

21 travelers online now

Comments

Indianapolis Things to Do

Travel tips and advice posted by real travelers and Indianapolis locals.
Map of Indianapolis