Fun things to do in Indiana

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    Exterior of Hyde Brothers Books
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    Indianapolis Soldiers and Sailors...
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Most Viewed Things to Do in Indiana

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    Buddist Monasteries in Indiana

    by staindesign Updated Jun 17, 2009

    On a recent trip to Bloomington, IN, I was fortunate enought to make a side trip to the Tibetan Mongolian Cultural Center. It is truely an amazing place, you'll find yourself driving down Indiana country roads and then all of a sudden there is a brightly colored welcome arch of the cultural center. It was impressive! Apparently, the place was opened by the eldest brother of the Dalai Lama, Thubten J. Norbu. The place was built up some what slowly, the Dalai Lama has been there several times over the years to bless different buildings and sculptures upon completion. On his last trip, he renamed the place to include Mongolians, before that it was the Tibetian Cultural Center. Currently, the center is still very active since Mr. Norbu passed away Sept 2008. The monastery is having "church" on sundays, which inncludes 2 hours of yoga, a vegetarian lunch, then another 2 hours of teaching and meditation. Also, there are 4 monks that are required to live at and run the temple at any given time and a 5th monk from mongolia is actually staying there right now as well. A wonderful woman by the name of Linda gave us a very knowledgeable tour. It was so amazing all of the info she gave about all the different aspects of the center. I would recommend anyone to visit the cultural center, it is an interesting place to experience in Indiana!

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    • Arts and Culture
    • Religious Travel

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    Michigan City - Gateway to Lake Michigan

    by Toughluck Updated Mar 27, 2008

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    You can see my Michigan City page and those listed below for details..
    Museums
    Beachfront with bandstand
    Boat Basin
    Washington Park & Beach [wide expansive beach. Lots of room for running and sandcastles.
    Michigan City Lighthouses (2 not just 1) [Lighthouse Museum is in the oldest]
    Washington Park Zoo
    Shopping and Outlet Mall {Lighthouse Place}
    Historic Home [Barker Mansion]

    Oh, and a casino. Not my interest, but it's here if it's your interest.

    Michigan City's website
    Northwest Indiana's Michigan City page

    Related to:
    • Road Trip
    • Beaches

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    Vincennes - The Revolution in the West

    by Toughluck Updated Mar 27, 2008

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    Vincennes dates back to before the American Revolution (War of Independence) [1776]. It was a French settlement that became part of English North America after the French & Indian War 1763. During the American Revolution, the French inhabitants were willing to support the cause of Independence from England and provided support or at a minimum stayed out of the way of the American Military.

    Here is George Rogers Clark National Memorial, which remembers the war in the west. North of the Memorial is the old town with the territorial seat of the Indiana Territory and the early capital of Indiana (1816). You can spend a day reliving the frontier life.

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    • Architecture
    • National/State Park
    • Historical Travel

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    Hollywood Bar & Filmworks

    by pabertra Updated Dec 31, 2007

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    NOTICE---THIS PLACE HAS SINCE CLOSED
    This place gives dinner and a movie a whole new spin serving both simultaneously. The theatre is kid friendly during the day, but in the evening is open to the 18 and over crowd to enjoy drinks and a semi-recent movie for a reasonable price. It's a nice alternative for one of those nights you feel like going out with friends, but want to bypass clubbing for something more relaxed. You can still enjoy old movies here as well including several screenings of the Rocky Horror Picture Show

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    Visit Notre Dame University Campus

    by no1birdlady Updated Oct 19, 2007

    We visited Notre Dame Campus in South Bend on our way north. After parking in visitor parking, we walked around campus. It's early June and was a beautiful time of year to be here with blooming lilac bushes, Dogwoods, Azaleas, tulips and small crab apple trees. Mostly we just walked about the campus and enjoyed buildings such as the St. Thomas Moore Chapel which is part of the law school. There is a nice statue here of Sorin, a priest of the Holy Cross Order who founded South Bend, founding a mission here for the Potawatomi Indians and a school for students studying the Holy Cross Order. This mission became Notre Dame and the city grew up around it. There is a beautiful cathedral here begun in 1870. In front of it is a beautiful large bed of red tulips with a statue of Jesus in the center. It is beautiful inside with 44 large stained glass windows. Murals were painted by Luigi Gregori, artist of the Papal Household of Pope Pius IX. He was a professor of art here at the university. The tower here is 218 ft. tall with 23 bells. Next door is the main building shown in photo no 2. It was built in 1879 with a gold dome covered in gold leaf. We went inside and were amazed by the huge murals here about Columbus, a catholic hero. These too were by Gregori and are magnificent at 11 feet tall. The first photo on this site is a view of the campus looking out from the main building. We also walked over to look at the huge modern mural on the face of the new library with a reflecting pool in front of it to reflect the modernist mural. The mural is called "The Word of life". It depicts Christ with arms raised.

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    • Religious Travel
    • Historical Travel
    • Study Abroad

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    Visit Notre Dame University Campus

    by no1birdlady Written Oct 18, 2007

    We visited Notre Dame Campus in South Bend on our way north. After parking in visitor parking, we walked around campus. It's early June and was a beautiful time of year to be here with blooming lilac bushes, Dogwoods, Azaleas, tulips and small crab apple trees. Mostly we just walked about the campus and enjoyed buildings such as the St. Thomas Moore Chapel which is part of the law school. There is a nice statue here of Sorin, a priest of the Holy Cross Order who founded South Bend, founding a mission here for the Potawatomi Indians and a school for students studying the Holy Cross Order. This mission became Notre Dame and the city grew up around it. There is a beautiful cathedral here begun in 1870. In front of it is a beautiful large bed of red tulips with a statue of Jesus in the center. It is beautiful inside with 44 large stained glass windows. Murals were painted by Luigi Gregori, artist of the Papal Household of Pope Pius IX. He was also a professor of art here at the university. The tower here is 218 ft. tall with 23 bells. Next door is the main building shown in the photo here. It was built in 1879 with a gold dome covered in gold leaf. We went inside and were amazed by the huge murals here about Columbus, a catholic hero. These too were by Gregori and are magnificent at 11 feet tall.

    Related to:
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    • Religious Travel

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    Find out About Obscure Pigeon Roost Memorial

    by no1birdlady Written Oct 18, 2007

    Pigeon Roost is a small town which was named for the flocks of passenger pigeons that nested here. This frontier village was attacked by indians during the War of 1812 when the British and Indians joined forces against the United States. There's a 44 ft obelish here to mark the burial site of settlers burned by the Indians in this 1812 war. The monument was put up in1903 at the back of the cemetry. We stopped here for a break to look at the monument, enjoy the iris planted around it, and to bird watch. Here we saw Rose-breasted Grosbeaks, and a Blackpoll Warbler. We enjoy little out of the way places and this qualifies.

    Related to:
    • Birdwatching
    • Historical Travel

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    Bird at Muscatatuck National Wildlife Refuge

    by no1birdlady Written Oct 18, 2007

    We stopped at Muscatatuck NWR to bird watch for several hours in the afternoon. This is a very good refuge with lots of woods and ponds providing places for birds to nest. The ranger at the headquarters was very helpful. There is a wildlife drive which goes through most of the more interesting habitats. Some of the birds we saw here were: Indigo Buntings, Great-crested Flycatchers, Yellow-breasted Chats, E. Wood Peewees, White-breasted and Brown-headed Nuthatches, Warbling Vireos, Redstarts,and Blue-winged Warblers. Wild white florabunda roses were in bloom adding beauty to the area as well as fields of the Golden Ragwort. In ponds were Canada Geese and Wood Ducks, both with babies. And Tree Swallows were nesting in boxes. This is an interesting place to go if you are a birdwatcher or just a wildlife lover.

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    • Birdwatching

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    Corydon Indiana's first State Capital

    by JREllison Updated Oct 5, 2007

    Corydon is the county seat of Harrison County as well as the first captial of Indiana. The old capital building has been preserved as a museum on the square in the center of town. The square is surounded by several quaint shops and antique stores.

    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Historical Travel
    • Seniors

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    Stop at historic Loyal, Indiana

    by no1birdlady Written Aug 13, 2007

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    We were heading through Indiana on Highway 31 when we spotted a small historic village so we stopped. It was built between 1900 and 1925 and was very interesting. There were two round barns, a small red one and a larger white one built in 1924. Round barns were thought to be more efficient but evidently they never caught on because I've seen very few of them. The William Polke House is here too. It was built in 1834. They were the first white settlers here and it's the oldest house north of the Wabash River. It was a stage coach inn on the Michigan road. In the town there was a doctor's and dentist's office with all of their implements, a general store, a print shop with printing press, and also a blacksmith shop with forge and tools. In the front was a Depot and a piece of train track with caboose. A cider mill showed where cider used to be made

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    Festivals

    by Toughluck Updated Apr 5, 2007

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    When fall roles around, Indiana breaks out the party hat. There is a festival in nearly every town in the state. Blueberry's in Plymouth, Popcorn in Valparaiso, Elvis in Portage. You can't miss for trying. Name a topic and there will be a festival.
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    Porter County alone has the:
    Popcorn Festival, Tractor Show, Corvette Show, Oz Fest, Fall Harvest Festival, and the Maple Sugar Festival (Spring).
    Valparaiso-Porter County Festivals
    .
    Other Festivals
    Feast of the Hunters Moon in West Lafayette.
    Strawberry Festival in Crawfordsville
    Scarecrow Festival in Wanatah

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    See the Capital "INDIANAPOLIS"

    by Toughluck Updated Mar 17, 2007

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    Indianapolis is the largest metropolitan area in the state. It is the center of politics, the economy, the arts, and sports. This is one complete town that can fill you needs and your dreams.

    My Indianapolis page
    Monument Circle
    Eiteljorg Museum
    Indianapolis Zoo
    Children's Museum
    All VT Listings for Indy

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    • School Holidays
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    Valparaiso - Home of Popcorn

    by Toughluck Updated Mar 8, 2007

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    Technically a part of the Greater Chicago Metropolitan area, Valparaiso is a growing city with a local small town flavor. Easy access to the lakeshores, yet plenty to do in town, from 2 community theaters, college and high school sports, seasonal events and the signature Popcorn Festival each fall. For more information, see my Valparaiso page.

    Neighbors:
    Porter; Chesterton, Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore, Indiana Dunes State Park, Hebron, Michigan City, Kouts

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    Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore & State Park

    by Toughluck Updated Mar 8, 2007

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    Some of the wildest sand dunes in the country. Well, maybe not wild in the sense of remote, hard to reach, untamed by human contact. Wild in the sense that it's totally unlike the towns and cities that surround it or anywhere else in Indiana. See my Indiana DunesNational Lakeshore or Indiana Dunes State Park

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    • National/State Park

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    Covered Bridges

    by Toughluck Updated Mar 8, 2007

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    Did you know that there are Kings and Queens in Indiana? There are Burr Arches, Howe Trusses and Post and Pratt Trusses as well as Long Trusses! These are all different types of covered bridges. To most of us, a covered bridge is interesting because of it's 'cover'. But if you look inside, you'll find that there are a variety of types out there.

    Indiana has about four dozen covered bridges. Nearly half are within five or six counties centered on Parke County, west of Indianapolis. The Burr Arch is the most common and it's single spans reach over 100'. The rare triple span (in south central Indiana - Medora, Jackson County) is nearly 400' long. Some are short (Queen posts) and some shorter (Kings post). Many are inbetween.
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    Parke County Covered Bridges - Rockville
    Putnam County Covered Bridges - Greencastle
    Putnam County CB - Travelogue
    Brown County State Park
    Jackson County, Seymour Covered Bridges

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Indiana Hotels

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Indiana Things to Do

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