West Lafayette Off The Beaten Path

  • Off The Beaten Path
    by Toughluck
  • Off The Beaten Path
    by Toughluck
  • Off The Beaten Path
    by Toughluck

Most Recent Off The Beaten Path in West Lafayette

  • Toughluck's Profile Photo

    Trail of Death

    by Toughluck Updated Nov 1, 2007

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    In 1838 some 800 Patawatomi Indians, being forcibly remvoed from Marshall County to Kansas, camped along this road, the LaGrange-Logansport State Road. On this "trail fo dearth', scoresof Native Americans suffered and died. The mother of Chief We-wiss-sa, said to be over 100 years old, died near here no September 12, 1838

    Erected by
    Tippecanoe County Historical Assn.,
    1988

    Entries from the diary of Jesse C. Douglas, Enrolling Agent under General Tipton, the United States' conductor of the forced removal.

    ... Saturday 15th Sept. 10 mi., camp by filthy stream near Indiana-Illinois state line. Young Indians allowed to go hunting. 2 small children died along the road.

    Other Sites:
    Plymouth
    Rochester
    Logansport
    Carrol County
    Battleground and West Lafayette
    Independence
    Williamsport

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Toughluck's Profile Photo

    Tippicanoe County Courthouse

    by Toughluck Written Oct 5, 2007

    2 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    3 more images

    Located in Lafayette, across the river is the county courthouse. It's a unique gleaming white steeple.

    For a sample of other County Courthouses in Indiana, see my Courthouse travelogue

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Toughluck's Profile Photo

    Wolf Park

    by Toughluck Written Apr 21, 2007

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The park is open to the general public from May through November and Saturday evening for Howl Nights. The park is home to several packs of gray wolves, plus foxes and bison.

    Every school kid from our area, travels to the park and spends the afternoon learning about the wolves and bison. The park also has other North American Mammals for you to see. You don't have to be part of a group. Every afternoon in the summer, you can show up and you'll be given a tour of the park.

    General Admissions are $7.00 adults (14 years and older), $8.00 on Sunday.
    Kids 6-13 are $5.00, $6.00 on Sunday. Members and kids 5 and under FREE!

    Related to:
    • Eco-Tourism

    Was this review helpful?

  • Toughluck's Profile Photo

    Tippecanoe Battleground

    by Toughluck Updated Apr 21, 2007

    See my Battle of Tippecanoe travelogue.

    Indiana Historical Bureau: ID#: 79.19??.1
    County: Tippecanoe
    Title: Tippecanoe Battleground 2.1 Miles East
    Marker Text: Urged by the Prophet, Tecumseh's brother, Indians attacked army of Gen. W. H. Harrison Nov. 7, 1811. The victory by Harrison broke Indian power.

    Credit Line: Indiana Historical Bureau
    Directions: West side of SR 43 at Prophet's Rock Road & Burnetts Road, 0.2 mile south of I-65 exit 178, Battle Ground.

    The Tippecanoe Battlefield Museum hours are:
    November - March: 12 pm - 5 pm daily
    April - October: 10 am - 5 pm daily
    Closed during the month of January
    Closed on Thanksgiving, Christmas, and New Year's. The Tippecanoe Battlefield Museum is closed during the month of January for upkeep and maintenance.

    Admission:
    $4.00 adults
    $3.00 seniors, AAA, Active Military
    $1.00 children
    Free TCHA Members

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • National/State Park

    Was this review helpful?

  • Toughluck's Profile Photo

    Prophetstown State Park

    by Toughluck Written Apr 21, 2007

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The park is named for a Native American village located between the rivers established by Tecumseh, who was Shawnee, and his brother Tenskwatawa (The Prophet) in 1808. Tecumseh led his band there from Ohio, where pressure from white settlers had forced him to leave. Tecumseh believed the only way to repel the advance of European settlement was to form an alliance with other tribes. He traveled widely persuading tribes to join his coalition. Over 14 tribes set aside centuries old disputes to stop their common enemy. They met at Prophetstown, and heard The Prophet speak. Tecumseh anticipated their sheer numbers would be enough to stop the westward settlement.

    Driving Directions
    Take I-65 to exit number 178 which is SR 43 Go SOUTH on SR 43 (away from the park---trust me this is correct) for a very short distance and then turn LEFT onto Burnett Rd. Burnett Road will "T" into 9th St. Go right on 9th St. to Swisher Road which will be a HARD left immediately after the Veterinary Office. Once on Swisher Road you will cross back under the Interstate and find the Park Gatehouse directly ahead.

    Do not use computer maping directions, they are incorrect. Due to a quirk, it will land you in the WRONG PLACE.

    P.O. Box 327
    Battle Ground, IN 47920

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • National/State Park

    Was this review helpful?

  • Toughluck's Profile Photo

    Tecumseh Trail

    by Toughluck Updated Mar 28, 2007

    2 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Indiana Historical Bureau: ID#: 79.1953.1
    County: Tippecanoe
    Title: Tecumseh Trail

    Marker Text: Used by Indian tribes and often traveled by Chief Tecumseh prior to defeat of his warriors by Gen. William Henry Harrison at the Battle of Tippecanoe on November 7, 1811.

    Credit Line: Women's Civic Council of Tippecanoe County
    Directions: SR 43, 3.8 miles north of SR 43 & State Street at roadside park adjacent to Wabash River, West Lafayette.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Toughluck's Profile Photo

    The Wabash River

    by Toughluck Updated Mar 28, 2007

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Wabash River

    Indiana Historical Bureau: ID#: 79.1973.1
    County: Tippecanoe
    Title: The Wabash River
    Marker Text: Side one:
    was called "Wah-bah-shik-ki" by the Miami. The French called it the "Oua-ba-che." It was the principal route connecting Quebec and New Orleans. The Miami, Potawatomi, Mascouten, Wea, Kickapoo, and Piankashaw Indians lived in the Wabash Valley. Along the river the French established Fort Ouiatanon (1717) and Post Vincennes (1732). The French lost their empire to the British in 1763. The Ottawa chief, Pontiac, who led a revolt against the British, made peace (1765) with the British at Ouiatanon.

    Side two:
    During the American Revolution George Rogers Clark seized Vincennes and Ouiatanon from the British. In 1778, Lt. Governor Henry Hamilton moved a force of 350 soldiers and Indians to Vincennes by the Wabash route. Clark captured his command in February of 1779. In the 19th century both flatboats and steamboats used the Wabash. By 1852 the Wabash and Erie Canal linked the Great Lakes with the Ohio. The Wabash has been a major highway for travel, trade, and settlement for two centuries. In song and in story it symbolizes Indiana.

    Credit Line: Erected by the Indiana Historical Society 1973
    Directions: SR 43, Mascouten Park & boat ramp adjacent to Wabash River, 1.1 miles north of intersection of SR 43 & State Street, West Lafayette.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • sticki's Profile Photo

    Fort Quiatenon

    by sticki Updated Dec 18, 2002
    Yeah, dunno what we're pointing at.

    Somewhat difficult to find, which means I can't tell you where it is, and there's still some debate on how to pronounce the name (or spell it, for that matter). But if you can find it it's a great place for cookouts and running around in the summer. It's right on the banks of the Wabash. You know what that means? Purdue Men's Crew Team practice!!

    Was this review helpful?

  • Well, if you just want a nice...

    by dzni Written Aug 26, 2002

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Well, if you just want a nice little drive, start driving north on SR 43 (River Road) from State St., which goes along the river and out of the valley (also off of this is Happy Hollow Rd., which gives a nice view of the city below if you look quickly while driving ;)). Keep taking this north, almost to I-65 until you see signs for Battleground... follow them there and check out the small little Tippecanoe Battleground (you know, 'Tippecanoe and Tyler Too...'). Also right out of Battleground, if you take the little road the curves right after crossing the railroad tracks, it'll take you to a one-lane bridge and right back up to SR 25.

    This is a good picture I found that shows the Wabash River in there, SOMEWHERE. No, it's there.. look carefully. The river freezes over from time to time.

    Was this review helpful?

  • If you like riding bikes,...

    by dzni Written Aug 26, 2002

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    If you like riding bikes, well, we don't offer a whole lot. :) But I do like riding and have decided that SR 26 West is the best route that I've found thus far. Yes, there's plenty of corn, but there seems to be a bit more civilization than if you take, say, county road 50W north (and there's a mean dog that tried to hurt me there! :)).

    Was this review helpful?

Instant Answers: West Lafayette

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

58 travelers online now

Comments

West Lafayette Off The Beaten Path

Reviews and photos of West Lafayette off the beaten path posted by real travelers and locals. The best tips for West Lafayette sightseeing.

View all West Lafayette hotels