Bowling Green Off The Beaten Path

  • Off The Beaten Path
    by butterflykizzez04
  • Off The Beaten Path
    by butterflykizzez04
  • Off The Beaten Path
    by butterflykizzez04

Best Rated Off The Beaten Path in Bowling Green

  • Cookie_Keith's Profile Photo

    Country Driving

    by Cookie_Keith Written Apr 4, 2003

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Two interesting places. One is the Old Richardsville Road bridge. It is a wooden deck steel bridge built in the late 1800s. Don't go there in the winter if there is ice on the roads! Almost killed myself there.

    A nice night time drive is down Glen Lily Road toward town. You can see the entire town. I have not been there at night since they rebuilt it, hopefully its still a good scene.

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  • John195123's Profile Photo

    If you want a beautiful,...

    by John195123 Written Sep 7, 2002

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    If you want a beautiful, clear, calm boating experience, take your boat up to Carrolton, Kentucky and put in at the docks there on the Ohio River. Drive down river a short distance and turn into the Kentucky River (left turn). Open up and enjoy the beautiful ride. My father and I spent the night on the river tied up to a tree. It was a great trip, except that we lost one of our two engines. On most boats that wouldn't be too much of a problem, but we have a jet boat, so it was. No real big deal. Here you will also get to pass through some of the oldest locks in Kentucky. Blow your airhorn and they'll come down to let you through. A great experience.

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  • KimberlyAnn's Profile Photo

    If You are Interested in the Civil War

    by KimberlyAnn Updated Apr 12, 2009

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    We didn’t do this---we came for the cars--, but this is some information I picked up while there. If you are interested in the Civil War, this might be worth your time. At the Tourist and Convention Commission (352 three Springs Rd.) you can pick up maps for a self-guided driving tour that will take you past Civil War forts, memorial, and other sites relating to the war. Something we will do next time, if we get back that way.

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  • butterflykizzez04's Profile Photo

    Horseshoe Camp Modern Cottages

    by butterflykizzez04 Written Apr 29, 2014
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    I took these pictures of the Horseshoe Camp Modern Cottages outside of Bowling Green, Ky on Rt 31W...it is now abandoned and might be torn down soon..it would be such a waste to tear them down..they are a part of Americana and should be saved... I took these photos on April 17, 2014

    Before Interstate highways were built, starting in the early 1960s, two-lane US routes handled the heavy traffic of vacationers traveling north and south, and east and west.
    US 31W was one of Kentucky's main north-south highways in the two-lane days. Still in existence, it is one of a pair of highways (the other being US 31E) that run parallel from Louisville to Nashville. Together, though they are separated by several miles, US 31W and US 31E comprise a section of US 31, which stretches from the shore of Lake Michigan near Chicago to the shore of the Gulf of Mexico at Mobile, Alabama.
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    It is hard to overstate just how busy and dangerous America's major two-lane highways were in those days, the late 1940s through the late 1960s. During summer vacation season, the main roads were virtually bumper-to-bumper with big sedans speeding up and down the narrow strips at 65 miles per hour. Few cars had air-conditioning; long-distance travelers were hot and dirty all day long. There weren't any seatbelts, there weren't any airbags. Huge sedans and station wagons, backseats filled with screaming little Baby Boomers, handled like dumptrucks. Nerves were frayed. Traffic deaths in the United States peaked during this era.
    When it was time to stop for the night, travelers generally took what they could get. During the busy season, even the rattiest of motels flashed "No Vacancy" signs by 6 p.m. Many a family had to spend the night in the car on the side of the road because there wasn't any room at the inn.
    Horseshoe Camp Modern Cottages, in the photo above, was not a ratty motel. Even now, it's easy to see that it was a sort of Holiday Inn of its day. Like many other motels of the time, each unit was a separate cottage. There were about 20 cottages, shielded from the busy highway by the motel's main building, which was a combination office/restaurant/gas station.
    The main building, the cottages, and a house for the owner or manager (just out of the photo, to the left) all were faced with native limestone. That's a common construction technique in Western Kentucky, practical and decorative at the same time. The chimney with its castle-like peaks is particularly striking.
    To the right of the motel is a large yard, which would have been a picnic and playground area for the guests. It's all grown up in weeds now, but hundreds of perennial flowers--daylilies, yuccas and the like--survive and still bloom every year. A low stone wall separates the yard from the highway.

    The day this picture was shot, a woman who lives in a large new house across the road told me that she had heard the old motor court was going to be demolished soon. She didn't say how she felt about that, one way or the other

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  • butterflykizzez04's Profile Photo

    Murrell Stagecoach Inn

    by butterflykizzez04 Written Apr 30, 2014
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    On Saturday April 12th, Tony and I was driving along Rt 31W outside of Bowling Green, Ky and found this lovely historical old home. The Historical Markers says its the home of Samuel Murrell in 1840's who used the home as a Stagecoach Inn between Louisville Ky and Nashville Tn..it was also the farm homesite of Susannah Henry Madison, Patrick Henry's sister..very fascinating stuff..

    The home is brick and lovely. I actually pulled into the driveway to turn around, and no one was at home. The log house on the property is also on the National Register of Historical Places. Susannah Henry Madison lived in the log house.
    We stopped so I could take a few pictures.
    I would love to go inside but it is a private home now.

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    • Historical Travel
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Bowling Green Off The Beaten Path

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