Fun things to do in Bowling Green

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    River Walk Park

    by butterflykizzez04 Written May 1, 2014

    Tony and I was URBAN Hiking in Bowling Green a few weeks ago Saturday, and we found the River Walk Park that overlooks the Barren River. The park is very nice. Has a great paved walkway which is easy for handicap access..There are a lot of signs to learn about the area, the Civil War in the area and the history of the soldiers who fought here. Also history of the L & N Railroad.

    Here is some information I found out about it on the web:
    RIVER WALK AT MITCH MCCONNELL PARK
    If you are touring the downtown area and desire a more natural setting in which to stretch your legs, head down to the Riverwalk, a multi-use path that takes you past three overlooks of the winding Barren River. Cross the pedestrian bridge on this portion of the Greenways walking and biking trail system around Bowling Green. Restrooms, park benches, water fountain and 18 parking spaces available.

    The day was very lovely! The weather was extremely nice

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    Fountain Square Park

    by butterflykizzez04 Written Apr 29, 2014

    This particular Saturday, Tony and I was out enjoying the gorgeous Sunny weather. We were out looking for yard sales with original intent to go to Louisville. But, we decided to URBAN HIKE downtown Bowling Green and I am very glad we did.

    We happened upon the Town Square, the actual Courthouse is located a few blocks over. So, this square is home to a gorgeous large Fountain. It is blocked out with flowers and memorials and is very lovely. It is actually more like a Town Rectangle but hey we will say square..it is more commonly known than rectangle..Fountain Square - historic Victorian fountain and city square in Downtown Bowling Green is very lovely. Check it out next time you are in the area and let me know what you think...

    Some history I found out about the Square and Fountain to share:
    While laying out the town that would be called Bowling Green in 1796, brothers George and Robert Moore designated two acres for the construction of public buildings. Those two acres today make up Fountain Square Park, a green and peaceful focal point for the revitalization of downtown Bowling Green.

    Restored facades of 19th-century buildings, a renovated Art Deco movie theater, thriving businesses and bustling professionals surround the park's historic fountain, statues, flowers, shrubs, mature trees and benches. Once the site of prohibitionist marches, trolleys, livestock trades and scrap drives, today it is the host of summer concerts, parades, arts and crafts shows and many other festivals and events throughout the year.

    I just loved the Victorian Fountain, I wish I knew more about the fountain itself...

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    Walking around downtown Historic Bowling Green

    by butterflykizzez04 Written Apr 13, 2014

    2014 - Walking around historic Bowling Green (57 photos)
    Saturday, April 12, Tony and I was walking around downtown Bowling Green Ky. We enjoyed the nice weather. It was a very nice 77 degrees and sunny with just a hint of a breeze. We walked several blocks looking at all the churches and victorian homes and large homes. They are so beautiful!!! I enjoyed seeing the homes and the gardens.

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    Christ Episcopal Church

    by butterflykizzez04 Written Apr 13, 2014

    Saturday, April 12, 2014, Tony and I found this lovely old church. This building is absolutely gorgeous and so large. I wish I could have gotten inside to look around. I am amazed how they built buildings this large back before there was the construction technology of today. I love the buildings and the details of the construction of them. I wish I could learn more about this building and the history of the building

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    Warren Co. Courthouse in Bowling Green

    by butterflykizzez04 Written Apr 13, 2014

    Saturday, April 12, 2014, Tony and I found this lovely old Warren Co. Courthouse. This building is absolutely gorgeous and so large. I wish I could have gotten inside to look around. I am amazed how they built buildings this large back before there was the construction technology of today. I love the buildings and the details of the construction of them. I wish I could learn more about this building and the history of the building.

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    Veterans War Memorial at Warren Co. Courthouse

    by butterflykizzez04 Written Apr 13, 2014

    2014 - Veterans War Memorial at Warren Co. Courthouse (8 photos)
    Saturday, April 12, 2014, Tony and I was walking around historical Bowling Green, Ky and we found another church. There are so many of them and really close by each other, among many large and old homes. They are very gorgeous and so are the homes and churches. I love finding towns like this where they have not destroyed the lovely buildings

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    Victory Baptist Church

    by butterflykizzez04 Written Apr 13, 2014

    Saturday, April 12, 2014, Tony and I was walking around historical Bowling Green, Ky and we found another church. There are so many of them and really close by each other, among many large and old homes. They are very gorgeous and so are the homes and churches. I love finding towns like this where they have not destroyed the lovely buildings.

    I can't really find any history on this lovely church building. Once I do, I will update my review.

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    State Street United Methodist Church

    by butterflykizzez04 Written Apr 13, 2014

    Saturday, April 12, 2014, Tony and I was walking around historical downtown Bowling Green, Ky and we found several great churches and old victorian homes. I just love finding neighborhoods like this. I enjoy my Urban Hiking.

    I love finding these old homes, historical districts and old churches. It is one of my favorite things to do. I wish I could find out the history of all these homes and buildings. Who lived there, how much they cost to build, how long, how many years did they own them and live there. any tragedies..etc...My imagination runs wild...

    I don't know much about the history of this church or the building. I couldn't find anything on the internet about it much. Which I hate. I wish there was some history about this lovely old church. I know it was built in the early 1800's...and it is huge and gorgeous....

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    St Joseph Catholic Church

    by butterflykizzez04 Written Apr 13, 2014

    Saturday, April 12, 2014..Tony and I was vising Bowling Green. We walked around and checked out some wonderful neighborhoods and we happened across this lovely historic district called St Joseph and in the middle of this great old neighborhood is the large St. Joseph Cathedral. The doors were locked and I couldn't go inside. I can't get over all the doors to the churches are locked these days.

    St. Joseph Roman Catholic Church is a historic church at 430 Church Street in Bowling Green, Kentucky.
    It was built in 1870 and added to the National Register in 1975.
    St. Joseph's Catholic Church
    Many of the immigrant workers who lived in this area were Catholic. Although they cherished new opportunities, they clung to the traditions of the church. Reverend Joseph De Vries was sent to shepherd the Bowling Green mission in 1858. The congregation built a frame church which was replaced in 1862 by a larger masonry structure designed by Frank L. Kister, St. The church building was expanded in the late 1880's. Patterned after the cathedral at Cologne, Germany. St. Joseph's new church was dedicated in 1889. The St. Joseph Catholic School opened at this location in 1911 to provide education and religious training for children of parishioners.

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    Riverview at Hobson Grove

    by butterflykizzez04 Written Apr 12, 2014

    Saturday, April 12, 2014 Tony and I visited Hobson House aka Riverview at Hobson Grove. It sits in the middle of a golf course and disc course in this large park. There was a wedding there when we visited so we could not go inside so we strolled around outside and took some lovely photos of the old home.

    I found some history about the home.
    If you are in the area, I highly recommend you visit the grounds and the home if you can get in.
    Riverview at Hobson Grove was built as the home of Atwood Gaines Hobson and his wife Juliet "Julia" van Meter Hobson on a small promontory and was named because of its proximity to the Barren River. Construction on the house started in the 1850s, but was halted due to the outbreak of the Civil War.

    Because Atwood Hobson was a staunch Union supporter and his eldest son, William, had been made a Colonel in the Union Army, the family was concerned about this property. The commanding officer of the Confederate troops, Simon Bolivar Buckner, who had fought with Atwood's brother, Edward, in the Mexican-American War, agreed to spare the partially built house. His troops built a temporary roof over the basement to use as a munitions magazine during the winter of 1861-1862, when Bowling Green was the Confederate capital of Kentucky.

    Riverview was finally completed in 1872. Riverview is a classic example of Italianate architecture with arched windows, deep eaves with ornamental brackets, and a cupola. The two parlors have painted ceilings. Atwood and Juliet Hobson incorporated some unusually unique ideas for their era into this home. A copper-lined wooden collection tank in the attic, which was connected to the outside guttering, provided running water for the water closet on the second floor. Another innovation beneath the cupola is a hole in the ceiling, sometimes called an oculus, and is part of the ventilation system of the house. When the eight windows in the observatory are open and the windows and doors are open on the floors below, a vacuum is created, pulling the hot air up and out of the house, keeping the air continuously circulating. It works much as an attic fan would work in a home today.

    The Hobson family and their descendants lived in the house until 1952. After a string of various successive tenants and being damaged by fire, the structure was abandoned and condemned in 1965. The city of Bowling Green purchased the property with the intent of demolishing the house and building a golf course. The house was saved when a non-profit organization, the Hobson House Association, was formed the next year, restoring the dwelling in Victorian style.[2] The proposed golf course was built nearby and can be viewed from the hill upon which Riverview sits.

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    Historic Rail Park and L & N Depot

    by butterflykizzez04 Written Apr 12, 2014

    Saturday, April 12, 2014, Tony and I visited the Historic Rail Park Train Museum and L & N Depot. They were going to have a wedding reception there, so we were limited to what we could see. I was able to take a few pictures outside of the trains and the depot.
    Admission is $12 per adult..and $10 per kid...I think it was a little high..
    too costly for me and they don't offer any AAA discounts.

    The Historic Railpark and Train Museum, formerly the Louisville and Nashville Railroad Station in Bowling Green, Kentucky, is located in the historic railroad station. The building was placed on the National Register of Historic Places on December 18, 1979. Opened in 1925, the standing depot is the third Louisville & Nashville Railroad depot that served Bowling Green.

    The first Bowling Green railroad depot was built in 1858 prior to the L&N's rails reaching Bowling Green. The first Louisville & Nashville station in Bowling Green was a brick (sic, no photos or descriptions exist) building.

    The line from Nashville reached Bowling Green on August 10, 1859. The line between Louisville and Nashville was complete on October 18, 1859, and was celebrated by 10,000 Nashvillians.

    During the Civil War, the young L&N found itself to be a point of contention between the North and South. Kentucky was integral to the war and President Lincoln summed up the situation in this manner: "I think to lose Kentucky is nearly the same as to lose the whole game". Bowling Green was critical to both sides with its proximity to the Confederate state of Tennessee. The L&N branched just south of Bowling Green with routes to Clarksville, TN, and the line to Memphis, TN, opening the path to the Western war plans. By 1863 the L&N was the only railroad to cross both Union and Confederate Territories. The actions of L&N President James Gutherie resulted in a contentious relationship with the U.S. War Department, after the Battle of Perryville sealed Kentucky's alliance, but saved the L&N's future.

    When the Confederates were forced to retreat from the city in February 1862, they burned downtown and all the supplies they could not carry, as well as the depot and trains. The Union troops occupying the city set about building a new depot. It was a wooden building and served the railroad and people of Bowling Green into the 20th century.

    In 1878 malaria broke out from New Orleans to Memphis, Tennessee. Residents of Memphis wishing to escape the epidemic boarded the L&N trains, but residents from other towns refused to let them leave the train at their towns. Bowling Green's station was the first place they could leave the train, but enormous bonfires were built in order to deter infection. The evacuation of Memphis lasted a few days, until Memphis was quarantined

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    The Presbyterian Church of Bowling Green

    by butterflykizzez04 Written Apr 12, 2014

    Saturday, April 12, 2014, Tony and I was doing a URBAN Hike around downtown Historical section of Bowling Green when we found this Gorgeous example historical beauty. I tried the doors and they were locked or I would have went inside. I took many photos around the outside of the building Next time I visit Bowling Green I hope to visit this church again on the inside.

    some history on the church I found on the internet:
    When Reverend Joseph B. Lapsley founded the Bowling Green Presbyterian Church in 1819, the nearest established church was Caney Fork in Butler County. Ordained ministers of the denomination had visited the Three Springs area to conduct services, but none had remained. Several rural Cumberland Presbyterian congregations had formed following the fervor of the Second Great Awakening in the early 1800s, but none existed in the village of Bowling Green. Lapsley gathered the local Presbyterians (many of whom were relatives and friends from Rockbridge County, Virginia) and soon built a church in the public burying ground [now called Pioneer Cemetery and located in the block bounded by College, Center, Fifth, and Sixth Streets.] Lapsley also taught school there but unfortunately lived only four years after the founding. Session records of the early years are sparse, giving no hint of how the church came to be in the cemetery and no indication of what happened to it. By the time the congregation's next full-time pastor arrived in 1831, the building was gone. Reverend Samuel Wilson Calvert (grandfather of popular Aunt Jane of Kentucky author Eliza Calvert Oberchain) immediately pulled together the fifty-odd members and managed to build a structure far ahead of its time architecturally and substantial enough to have survived occupation as a Union hospital during the Civil War, an 1895 fire in the steeple, two splits, three reunions, and multiple remodelings. In addition to raising the nearly $7000 necessary to construct their sanctuary, Bowling Green Presbyterians supported an excellent female academy in the structure's basement until 1862.
    Shortly after completion of the building, the congregation split into Old School and New School factions. Nationally, the disruptive issues were in the areas of polity and theology; locally the dividing points were sectional difficulties and personalities. Between 1849 and 1858, the two "schools" had separate ministers and met on alternate Sundays in the church sanctuary. The breach was healed in 1858, just in time for the disruption of the Civil War. Although nationally the Presbyterian Church split along Union and Confederate lines, the local church did not divide until 1868. This division was not as amicable as the former, and the courts had to intervene in splitting the church's property. Former Old School supporters formed First Presbyterian Church, U.S. (Southern) and retained the building. Prominent Unionist families, mostly New Schoolers, formed Second Presbyterian Church, U.S.A.(Northern) and moved to the corner of Eighth and Center Streets. This schism ended in 1888 with the reunion of the congregations as First Presbyterian Church, U.S.
    After many years of worshiping in rural churches, Cumberland Presbyterians established a town church in 1866 under the leadership of Reverend Jesse Grider. They prospered in a substantial structure on Eleventh Street, near the corner of Center, until the 1906 national union of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church and the Presbyterian Church, U.S.A. The local congregation had mixed feelings about the reunion. The majority retained the building and became Eleventh Street Presbyterian Church U.S.A. (After 1912, they relocated to the corner of Twelfth and State Streets and took the name Westminster Presbyterian Church, U.S.A.). Those who desired to remain Cumberland built a new house of worship at the corner of College and Eleventh Streets, where they remained until their 1970 move to Campbell Lane.

    Bowling Green Presbyterians proved once again to be in the forefront of the union movement when the First and Westminster Presbyterian Churches combined in 1949 to become The Presbyterian Church of Bowling Green--exactly thirty-four years ahead of the national reunion. Significant additions and alterations to the physical plant have occurred in the almost half-century since that reuniting, but the landmark sanctuary and steeple still stand as symbols of the Reformed tradition in Warren County. 2004 was the 185th Anniversary of the Church.

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    Felts Log Home at WKU Campus

    by butterflykizzez04 Written Apr 12, 2014

    Saturday, April 12, Tony and I was driving around the campus of WKU in Bowling Green and we found this old two story log house on campus. It was so strange among all the large campus buildings. I was able to get one photo due to the one way road I was on, but I did find some on the internet to share.
    Here is the history I found from the internet

    This early nineteenth century log house built in Logan County, KY is a classic example of traditional Kentucky architecture.
    The dog-trot floor plan and poplar, oak, and walnut construction are typical of the architecture of the region. Reproduction
    furniture, equipment, tools and clothing inside the Felts House accurately represent an upper income South Central Kentucky
    family home of 1815

    Originally built by Archibald Felts on land near the Gasper River, this log house had remained relatively unchanged over the years. Recognized as a fine example of regional craftsmanship, it was moved here in 1980. Important characteristics include the traditional V-notch and dogtrot construction and the unusual handmade moldings, paneling, and forged hardware.
    Erected by Donated by Mr. and Mrs. Sam Houston Watkins.

    Dogtrot Construction of the Cabin
    Dog Trot log cabins are essentially two log cabins separated by an area that is usually left open. The area in between the cabins/pens, is referred to as a Trot & was used as a breezeway in the Southern States. Dog Trot log cabins are generally oriented so that summer prevailing winds could be used for cooling.

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    Bowling Green City Hall

    by butterflykizzez04 Written Apr 12, 2014

    April 12, 2014, Saturday, Tony and I was walking around Bowling Green when we happened upon this awesome building. It is large and gorgeous. I have this thing about large old buildings with any sort of historical value. They are amazing to me!!! The technology back then to build them and they last over time.

    President JFK actually stood in front of the City Hall building in 1960 and gave a speech. There are some historical photos on record of him giving that message to the people of Bowling Green KY

    History of the building:
    Under the guidance of Mayor George T. Wilson (1903-1909), the City began to build City Hall at 10th & College in 1907. Bids went out that July. Several firms submitted bids, but C. H. Smith was selected to complete the job. The original bid came in at $29,000 for the three story building but was reduced to $25,239 after modifications such as not adding a large balcony in the Commission Chambers. The original plans also showed three large interior windows that would have opened views of the Commission Chambers to the hallway.
    City Hall was designed by Louisville architect Brinton B. Davis (1862-1952). Davis was dubbed "The Hill Builder", as he designed WKU's master plan in 1909, Van Meter Hall, and most of the structures at the top of the hill. His association with WKU continued until 1939
    Construction on City Hall was completed in 1908. City Hall has been the seat of city government ever since, with the exception of when the building was vacated during the extensive renovation of 1986-87
    Throughout the years, City Hall has seen many changes. The original layout of the City Hall building included the Mayor's and City Clerk's offices, which are still in the building today, plus several other offices. Both men's and women's jail cells were located in City Hall as well as the City Physician, Library, Chief of Police, Police Court, City Engineer, the City Attorney, and Prosecuting Attorney. The old plans show jail cells where the City Manager's Office and lower level Human Resources reception desk are located, with a spiral staircase connecting the two. The Health Department was still located in the building into the 1950's.
    At one point in the mid-1980's, prior to purchase and renovation of the City Hall Annex, City Hall held its current functions plus what are now the Finance, Information Technology, and Neighborhood & Community Services departments
    There have been several renovations to the building. In 1962 construction opened up additional offices where the jail cells stood. A 1978 renovation included a sound system, more seating in the Commission Chambers, and modifications to the lower level. City Hall was completely renovated in 1986-87, adding an elevator, new restrooms with handicapped access, and restoring some of the unique original design features that had been lost through modernization. During the 1986-87 renovation, Board of Commissioners meetings were held in the old High Street Community Center community room and city offices were located in the Paxton House on 10th Street. The Police Department shifted some of its operations to the Public Safety Training Center on New Porter Pike (now part of the Vindell Webster Fire Station). Later, Police management staff moved into the Paxton House once the City Hall renovation was completed.

    A major highlight in the building's life was when John F. Kennedy spoke on its steps on October 8, 1960, when he was campaigning for President.

    On September 16, 2008, City officials buried a time capsule directly in front of the City Hall sign. The marker indicates that the capsule is to be opened during City Hall's bicentennial, which will be in 2108. The capsule contains numerous artifacts from 2008, including current and historic documents, publications, photos and magazines about Bowling Green, City budget, sample agenda/minutes from a Board of Commissioners meeting, police officer and firefighter uniforms and patches, directory of city employees, matchbox Corvette, golf balls from the three city golf courses, disc golf frisbee, mini-skate board, city flag, and 2007 city map.

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  • Chuck Crume Nature Trails

    by 6Lindseys Written Nov 23, 2009

    Looking for a place to unwind? Chuck Crume Nature Trails is 20 acres of beautiful walking trails in town. The trails are not long, but do intertwine and can be made into as long a walk as you would like.

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