Danville Things to Do

  • Things to Do
    by charredbarrel
  • Things to Do
    by charredbarrel
  • Things to Do
    by charredbarrel

Most Recent Things to Do in Danville

  • Wilderness Trail Distillery - Bourbon Tours

    by charredbarrel Updated Jul 17, 2014

    Wilderness Trail Distillery is located on the world famous Kentucky Bourbon Trail Craft Tour. Stop in for a comprehensive tour of how premium craft distilled Wilderness Trail Kentucky Straight Bourbon, Blüe Heron Vodka, Harvest Rum and Settler's Select Whiskey is made using a copper pot still. All ingredients are locally sourced, the bourbon, whiskey and vodka grains only travel three miles from field to bottle. Tours are Thurs-Sat 10am-4pm, they begin on the hour and the last tour is at 3pm. Tastings and gift shop hours are Mon-Sat 10-4. Stop in to get your Bourbon Trail Passport stamped and see how some of the best spirits in the world are made in the heart of the Bluegrass region, Danville, KY.

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    The Old Post Office

    by Stephen-KarenConn Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    This small original log building housed the first U.S. Post Office west of the Alleghenies, when Kentucky was still a district of Virginia. Thomas Barbee was commissioned the first postmaster on August 20, 1792, and the first mail was received a few weeks later on November 3 of the same year.

    The original site of the post office was two blocks west of the present location, on Walnut Street. It was moved to Constitution Square for preservation and display as a part of the State Historic Site.

    The Old Post Office, Danville, Kentucky Interpretative Sign at the Old Post Office Inside the Old Post Office Inside the Old Post Office
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    Boyle County Courthouse

    by Stephen-KarenConn Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Boyle County was established in 1834 and named for Judge John Boyle, who served at different times as a state representative, United States Congressman, and U.S. District Judge for Kentucky.

    Although Danville was one of the first towns established in Kentucky, Boyle County was the 94th of Kentucky's 120 counties. It was formed from parts of Mercer and Lincoln Counties, with Danville being named the county seat.

    The first Boyle County Courthouse was erected on this site in 1842, and destroyed by fire 18 years later. The current courthouse was completed in 1862, just in time to be used as a hospital following the nearby Battle of Perryville (October 8, 1962) during the War Between the States.

    Boyle County Courthouse, Danville, Kentucky Historical Marker at Boyle County Courthouse Historical Marker at Boyle County Courthouse Historical Marker at Boyle County Courthouse Boyle County Courthouse, Danville, Kentucky
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  • The Great American Dollhouse Museum

    by Miniatures Written Jan 12, 2009

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    A history museum in miniature, this vast maze of timelines, villages and fantasy areas is more than a person can truly examine in one visit. The surprising aspect is that it is fascinating for boys as well as girls, not only because there's a deep, dark cave with dragons and trolls, but also for the general historical impact of the entire building and miniature scenes.

    The building is an historical ex-national guard armory with 20 foot ceilings, hung with old gothic church lights. The floors are all faux painted like brick, flagstone and gardens. There's also a big museum store with antiques, jewelry, and of course, a lot of dollhouse miniatures. Well worth a couple of hours drive.

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    Arts in Danville

    by Little_Lou_Lou Written Dec 23, 2007

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    Norton Center for the Performing Arts is Danville's local theater/performance hall. Located on beautiful Centre College campus, the center plays host to concerts, plays, art shows and more. Both programs from local area schools and major theater productions are put on yearly. I was able to see Vanessa Redgrave here, but unfortunately was not the least bit impressed with her one woman show "A Tribute to my Father". Norton's brings great amounts of culture to small town Kentucky.

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    Constitution Square

    by Little_Lou_Lou Written Dec 23, 2007

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    Constitution Square State Historic Site was the begining of Kentucky's statehood. Danville’s location on the Wilderness Road caused it to become a crossroad for settlers, and a political center. Danville was selected to house the first seat of Kentucky government. A meetinghouse, courthouse and jail were built to to support the local government. Between 1784-1792, ten constitutional conventions took place on the site of Constitution Square. Kentucky was granted statehood in 1792 due to the efforts of Danville's settlers.

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    Pioneer Playhouse

    by Little_Lou_Lou Written Dec 23, 2007

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    :"Our Roof Is the Whole Sky!"The Pioneer Playhouse is a seasonal outdoor theater that has local actors at their best. Kentucky's oldest outdoor theater, it adds a bit of culture to small town Danville throught creative productions, beautiful sets and a lovely setting. Pioneer Playhouse boasts the beginings of several major actors careers including Lee Majors, John Travolta, and Jim Varney.

    Dinner Served 7:30 PM / Show Time 8:30 (EDT)Reserved Seats........... Dinner and show-$25.00 Show only-$13.00 Children Under 6........Dinner and show- $ 6.50 Show only-$ 3.50

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    Alban Gilpin Smith Goldsmith House

    by Stephen-KarenConn Updated Jun 29, 2007

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    This brick house, circa 1820, was the home of Dr. Alban Goldsmith. Dr. Goldsmith was a pupil and assistant to Dr. Ephraim McDowell, whose home is located opposite Constitution Square on Second Street. Goldsmith assisted Dr. McDowell when he performed the first successful ovariotomy on Jane Todd Crawford in 1809, pioneering abdominal surgery.

    Goldsmith gained fame as a professor and a surgeon in his on right. He was the 3rd person in the world to perform a successful ovaritomony (removal of a female ovary) and the 1st to perform a successful laminectomy (back surgery.)

    Today the building houses Constitution Square’s Museum Store, on the corner of Second and Walnut Streets.

    Goldsmith House, Danville, Kentucky Plaque on the Goldsmith House
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    McDowell House and Apothecary Shop

    by Stephen-KarenConn Updated Jun 29, 2007

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    The Ephriam McDowell House, a National Historic Landmark, sits across Second Street from Constitution Square in downtown Danville.

    It was here on Christmas morning, 1809, that Dr. McDowell began his historic operation of abdominal surgery, without anesthetic or pain killers, neither of which was yet known to the medical profession. His patient, Mrs. Jane Todd Crawford, sang hymns as Dr. McDowell operated, removing an ovarian tumor which weighed twenty-two and one-half pounds.

    Mrs. Crawford recovered and returned to her home in Green County twenty-five days after the operation. She lived another thirty-two years as survivor of the first successful removal of an ovarian tumor in the world.

    Tours of the house are available; however it was undergoing extensive renovations in the spring of 2007.

    McDowell House, Danville, Kentucky Historic Marker at the McDowell House Welcome to the McDowell House and Apothecary Shop
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    Community Arts Center

    by Stephen-KarenConn Updated Jun 29, 2007

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    Located in the old Federal Building in Downtown Danville, the Community Arts Center is the focal point for the arts in Boyle County. The Center offers space for teaching, practicing, and viewing the arts, with free visual arts exhibits changing monthly. Preforming arts include dance, drama, music.

    The center's Grand Hall is a venue for both community events and for private parties and celebrations. Studio spaces provide for meetings and social gatherings as well as arts education.

    The building alone is worth seeing for its architectural interest.

    Hours:
    Tuesday - Friday: 10 a.m. - 5 p.m.
    Saturday: 10 a.m. - 3 p.m.

    Community Arts Center, Danville, Kentucky Community Arts Center, Danville, Kentucky Welcome to the Community Arts Center
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    Watts-Bell House and Museum

    by Stephen-KarenConn Updated Jun 29, 2007

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    The Watts-Bell House, circa 1816-1817, was built by William Watts adjacent to Fisher's Row in Danville and rented to a leading Danville merchant, David Bell. Like the Fisher’s Row houses adjacent to it, the Watts-Bell house is constructed of brick in the Flemish bond pattern.

    Joshua Frye Bell, who grew up in this house, served in the Kentucky state legislature, the United States Congress, and became Kentucky Secretary of State.

    The Danville Literary and Social Club, known today as the Anaconda Club, was founded here in 1839. It was the first organization of its type west of the Allegheny Mountains.

    Today the building is the site of the Danville/Boyle County Historical Society Museum. On the Tuesday morning that I was in Danville, in mid-June, the Museum was closed, so I was only able to peak in the windows. When the museum is open there is a small admission charge.

    Hours:
    Open Daily April 15 - October 15
    Monday-Sunday: 12 noon - 4 p.m.
    Closed Tuesday

    The Watts-Bell House Historical Marker at the Watts-Bell House Welcome to the Watts-Bell House
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    Fisher's Row

    by Stephen-KarenConn Updated Jun 29, 2007

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    Fishers Row, on the eastern edge of Constitution Square in downtown Danville, was built around 1816-1817 by Jeremiah Fisher as the first rental property in Danville. The row of historic buildings consists of two, two-story houses with a common center wall. The brickwork is in the Flemish bond pattern.

    After almost 200 years the buildings are still in use. On the north side of Fisher's Row is a gift shop operated by the Wilderness Trace Art League. The south side is home of the Boyle County Historical Society.

    Fisher's Row, Danville, Kentucky Fisher's Row, Danville, Kentucky Interpretative Marker at Fisher's Row
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    Trinity Episcopal Church

    by Stephen-KarenConn Updated Jun 29, 2007

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    Trinity Episcopal Church, on Main Street in downtown Danville, is the oldest church building still in use for public worship in Boyle County. Trinity Parish was organized in 1829 and the first building erected the following year.

    The edifice was gutted by fire on February, 22, 1860, in the same blaze that destroyed the Boyle County Courthouse and much of the downtown area. The church was Rebuilt on the original walls within a year. Like the courthouse, Centre College, and many other local buildings, it was used as a hospital to care for the wounded following the Battle of Perryville, October 8, 1862.

    Today Trinity is still an active parish with a wide range of programs and ministries.

    MISSION STATEMENT: We, the people of Trinity Church, Danville, Kentucky, seek in unity to confess the Name of the Risen Christ, to live together in His love, and to reveal His glory to the world. Through the gifts God has given us, it is our purpose to seek and serve Christ in all people, promoting justice, peace, and human dignity throughout Church, our community, and our world.

    Trinity Episcopal Church, Danville, Kentucky Welcome to Trinity Episcopal Church Historical Marker at Trinity Episcopal Church Trinity Episcopal Church, Danville, Kentucky

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    Danville Presbyterian Church

    by Stephen-KarenConn Updated Jun 29, 2007

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    The Danville Presbyterian Church traces its history back to 1784, when Rev. David Rice organized Presbyterians in the Danville area into what was known as Concord Church. The congregation moved to a "New Meeting House" in 1831 and this became the nucleus of the present home of the Presbyterian Church of Danville.

    During the time of the War Between the States the Presbyterians in the United States, and in Danville, split into northern and southern groups. A hundred years later, in 1969, the two Danville Presbyterian congregations reunited.

    The Danville church is not a tourist attraction but an active local congregation affiliated with the Presbyterian Church USA. Visitors are always welcome to attend the regular services.

    Danville Presbyterian Church Historical Marker at Danville Presbyterian Church
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    McDowell Park

    by Stephen-KarenConn Updated Jun 28, 2007

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    McDowell Park is a small but interesting green space between the Presbyterian Church and Centre College, on West Main Street. At first I thought it was just the graveyard for the church because there are several tombstones there. The park also features a paved walkway beneath large shade trees, the Danville Labyrinth (separate tip) and a couple of interesting monuments.

    One is a monument to the memory of Dr Ephraim McDowell (1771-1830), who moved to Danville in 1795. In 1809 Dr. McDowell became famous for performing the first entirely successful operation for the removal of an ovarian tumor.

    Another monument in McDowell Park honors the Confederate Dead of Boyle County (see hidden pictures.) I find it interesting that virtually every one of the 120 counties in Kentucky has a monument to the Confederacy, although it was known as a "border state." There are only a couple of Union monuments in Kentucky - in Louisville and in Vanceburg. It is claimed that the Vanceburg monument, overlooking the Ohio River, is the only monument to the Union built by public subscription south of the Mason-Dixon line.

    McDowell Monument Inscription on McDowell Monument Boyle County Confederate Monument
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Danville Things to Do

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