Frankfort Things to Do

  • Old Historic Governor's mansion
    Old Historic Governor's mansion
    by butterflykizzez04
  • Historical Marker about the Mansion
    Historical Marker about the Mansion
    by butterflykizzez04
  • Gates to the cemetery
    Gates to the cemetery
    by butterflykizzez04

Most Recent Things to Do in Frankfort

  • Toughluck's Profile Photo

    Old State House

    by Toughluck Updated Jul 15, 2008
    Historic Capitol Building

    Tour this national historic landmark, which introduced Greek-Revival architecture to the United States west of the Appalachian Mountains. The building served as the capitol of Kentucky from 1830 to 1910.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • Toughluck's Profile Photo

    State History Museum and Geneological Research Lib

    by Toughluck Updated Jul 15, 2008
    Diorama of a wharf along the Ohio River

    The History museum contains a wealth of information about Kentucky. There are lifesize dioramas, some of which you can walk into. From Native Americans through exploration, settlement, the discovery of coal, civil rights, several major wars, the Cold War to today. All are represented by their impacts on Kentucky's citizens and Kentucky's impact on the nation.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Toughluck's Profile Photo

    Daniel Boone's Grave

    by Toughluck Updated Jul 15, 2008

    Born 1734, Died 1820. Entered Eastern Kentucky, 1767; Explored Bluegrass Regn, 1769-71; Guided Transylvania Company, Blazed Wilderness Trail, Built Fort Boonesborough in 1775; Directed Defense of the Fort, 1778; Emigrated to Missouri, 1799; Reinterred, with wife Rebeeca in Frankfort Cemeitery, 1845.

    Sounds boring, but just think of what it means. At the age of 33, he started his career for which he is known, explorer of the transappalachian mountains. Then at the age of 65, he moved from Kentucky (south of Lexington) to central Missouri. While I've moved a lot in my life, it wasn't through uncharted wild lands. It wasn't by wagon and horse back.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Stephen-KarenConn's Profile Photo

    Statue and Death Spot of William Gobel

    by Stephen-KarenConn Updated Dec 13, 2007
    1 more image

    In front of the Old Kentucky Statehouse is a sober reminder that being a politician can be a hazardous occupation. A bronze marker on the brick walkway in front of the Old Capital marks the spot where William Gobel was gunned down on January 30, 1900, the day before he was sworn in as Governor of Kentucky. He died from the gunshopt wounds shortly after taking office, making him the only State Governor in United States history who was assisinated while in office.

    more...

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • davecallahan's Profile Photo

    Salato Wildlife Education Center

    by davecallahan Updated Feb 22, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    the
    2 more images

    Wish they had one of these when I was a kid. What the heck, I'm still a kid at heart, so I can enjoy it anyways.

    This is where wildlife (flora and fauna) and the classroom meet. The park has been open for about 10 years (1995). The layout is a visitor center with dioramas and live acquariums and indoor exhibits of animal habits and habitat. Then you take one of the hiking trails to see the animals where they live.
    You will be introduced to a sample of the diverse environment where wildlife live in Kentucky. Streams, ponds, marshes and wetlands, brush fields and woodlands are all on the trails in this park. On the "education" trails (easy walking), you will be able to see examples of the wildlife and there are exhibits that show how we can help that wildlife survive and what we need to do to keep the environment from being destroyed. Parts of the park are like an open-air zoo where animals are exhibited without danger of being interfered with by the people on the trails.
    Conservation, ecology and meshing wildlife within today's technologically driven world are the underlying themes of everything that happens at the Center.
    The park encloses a small lake where children can learn how to fish and what species are in the area and what they eat and where they go in the winter.
    There are also more strenuous trails aimed at the experienced/hardy hiker which take you into areas where the animals are free to roam.

    All of this does not come cheap.... you must donate something or go away with your conscience bothering you. The park is only available to the public because of state-complemented private donations.

    There are restroom facilities around the property and they have a couple of shelters that can be rented by the hour or for the day. (fairly cheap.... like $50 a day)

    Related to:
    • Road Trip
    • National/State Park
    • Family Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • davecallahan's Profile Photo

    Aerial Tour of Frankfort

    by davecallahan Updated Feb 22, 2007

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    To get a different perspective on the city of Frankfort, KY, you might consider taking an aerial tour over the city. Choose a sunrise or sunset flight for special effects. Bring your camera and plenty of film (or extra digital pic-cards).

    The planes are small four-seater props with wings over the fuselage (Cessna 172) to give you best view and scope. If you are not very good at taking pictures, you can even hire your own personal photographer. If you want them to take special pictures and you'd rather stay on the ground, they can provide that service also.

    This is not cheap ($150-$300 per hour) but it sure is a unique opportunity.
    The company is EAGLE WINGS AIR, family owned and operated in Frankfort.

    Related to:
    • Sky Diving
    • Road Trip

    Was this review helpful?

  • davecallahan's Profile Photo

    Vietnam Veterans Memorial

    by davecallahan Updated Feb 22, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    As the sun rises and falls, the shadow of the sundial on this memorial passes over the names of the veterans who rose to the call of duty and fell as victims of death.

    The names are those of Kentuckians but the visitors are from all over the world.
    On or about the anniversary of the veterans death, the shadow falls across that name plate embedded in the cement plaza. This is that veteran's "memorial day".

    The place is solemn, sobering and sad. I will be glad when the day comes that we will not need these visual reminders of nations' follies.

    another good website about this project is:
    http://www.helmr.com/ky.htm

    Related to:
    • Road Trip
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • davecallahan's Profile Photo

    Walking Tour of Frankfort downtown

    by davecallahan Updated Feb 22, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Walking tour of downtown Frankfort.

    The tour consists of 10 contiguous city blocks;
    from Ann Street on the east to Wilkinson Street on the west;
    from Wapping Street on the south to Broadway Street on the north.

    Along Wapping Street, from Wilkinson to St. Clair:
    218 Wilkinson... Greek Revival architecture
    505 Wapping... the Wilkinson home was once a tavern
    417 Wapping... architect also built spires at Churchhil Downs
    407Wapping... Greek Revival home once used by military in Civil War
    401 Wapping... the phrase "Dog is Man's best Friend" was born here
    320 Wapping... Todd House, brother-in-law to President Madison
    305 Wapping... Customs House was originally the Post Office then the Library
    the Singing Bridge is at the corner of Wapping and St. Clair

    Along St. Clair, from Wapping to Main:
    201 St. Clair... First Baptist Church
    Then the Court House and across the street the old Theater

    Along Main Street, from St. CLair to Wilkinson:
    326 Main... Morehead House
    329 Main... Goodman House
    333 Main... Coleman House
    401 Main... Crittendon House, he was Governor,Senator,Attorney General
    416 Main... Gothic architecture of the Presbyterian Church
    218 Wilkinson... Liberty Hall, Georgian architecture
    302 Wilkinson... Federal style of the Crittendon House

    walk from Wilkinson north to Broadway.
    Along Broadway Street, from Wilkinson to St.Clair:
    413 Broadway... Kendall House, he was tutor for Henry Clay
    318 Washington... Mcclure-Foster House now is Red Cross building
    333 Broadway... Bibb Law Offices
    north corner of Broadway and Lewis... Greek Revival architecture of Old State Capital

    Depending on your interest, the tour takes at least an hour and probably two.

    This is best done with one of the local "explorers" who will give detailed information about each building.
    Contact Russ Hatter's Tours, 502-696-0607

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Road Trip
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • grandmaR's Profile Photo

    Kentucky Historical Society

    by grandmaR Updated Feb 21, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    A Kentucky 'fiddle'
    4 more images

    We parked and crossed the apparently unused RR tracks to the Kentucky Historical Society Kentucky History Museum, which was something I had intended to visit anyway. We went to the Thomas D. Clark Center for Kentucky History, but the admission also includes the Kentucky Military History Museum and Old State Capitol.
    Hours Open Tuesday – Saturday 10-5
    Adults $4
    Youth (6-18) $2
    Children 5 and under receive complimentary admission

    The museum:
    is divided into eight main areas, chronicling life in Kentucky from prehistoric times to the present: First Kentuckians (10,000 BC-AD 1750), The Kentucky Frontier (1750-1800), The Antebellum Age (1800-1860), War and Aftermath (1860-1875), Continuity and Change (1875-1900), The New Century (1900-1930), Depression and War (1930-1950), and Many Sides of Kentucky (1950-today). Another area, Pure Kentucky, highlights the lives and contributions of famous Kentuckians through artifacts, from a boxing robe worn by Muhammad Ali...

    They told me I could take photos as long as I did not use a flash but a lot of the photos that I took are a little dark.

    After lunch, I came back and did some research in the library. I wanted Bob to go to the Old Capitol, but he didn't tour either the Old Capitol (which was included in the museum price) or the military museum.

    Was this review helpful?

  • Tom_Fields's Profile Photo

    Historic Houses in Frankfort

    by Tom_Fields Written Feb 2, 2006
    The Vest-Lindsey House
    2 more images

    Here are three prime examples of southern antebellum architecture, dating back well before the Civil War. They are all on different sides of the same intersection in Frankfort.

    The Vest-Lindsey House was the boyhood home of George Graham Vest, who served in the US Senate for three terms, and in the Confederate Congress. He coined the phrase "Dog is man's best friend." It was also home of Daniel Lindsey, who served in the Civil War as a Union regiment and brigade commander, and later as Adjutant General of Kentucky. For tours, call the number below.

    George Macklin was a prominent land-owner and coal dealer. Charles S. Morehead was governor from 1855-59, and his home was later owned by several important bankers and railroad tycoons.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Tom_Fields's Profile Photo

    Frankfort Cemetery

    by Tom_Fields Written Feb 2, 2006
    Frankfort Cemetery
    2 more images

    This cemetery overlooks the city, and the Kentucky River that runs through it. Its most notable point of interest is the grave of Daniel Boone and his wife Rebecca. A number of other distinguished Kentuckians are here as well: Vice President Richard M. Johnson, artist Paul Sawyler, and 17 former governors.

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Tom_Fields's Profile Photo

    The Old Capitol Building

    by Tom_Fields Written Feb 2, 2006
    The Old Capitol
    4 more images

    Built in 1830, this building is the only state capitol taken by the Confederates during the Civil War. It is now operated by the Kentucky Historical Society. Of particular interest is the Greek revival staircase, held together by its own weight. This building, designed by Lexington architect Gideon Shryock, introduced the Greek Revival style in Kentucky.

    When I visited in 1998, it had an exhibit commemorating the hundredth anniversary of the Spanish-American War of a century earlier.

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • Tom_Fields's Profile Photo

    The State Capitol Building

    by Tom_Fields Written Feb 2, 2006

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Kentucky's state Capitol
    1 more image

    Completed in 1910, this is the new state capitol. Built in the neo-classic style, with 70 ionic columns, it shows Kentucky as a heroine, with five attendants: Progress, History, Law, Art, and Labor. The rotunda was influenced by that of Les Invalides in Paris (where Napoleon is entombed). This is one of the country's most attractive capitol buildings.

    One of its unusual features is the Floral Clock. It's 34 feet across, and covered with thousands of flowers.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture
    • Arts and Culture

    Was this review helpful?

  • Ky_Happy_Dad's Profile Photo

    Visit the Kentucky history...

    by Ky_Happy_Dad Updated Aug 8, 2004

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Old State Capitol

    Visit the Kentucky history center and old state capitol and take a guided tour of the new state capitol, if time permits.

    For a visitor with more time, visit the Lt. Governor's mansion, the Liberty Hall Historic Site, the Executive mansion, and the Kentucky Military History museum.
    The history center was completed in1999. . It was built with many interactive displays and activities that fascinate even younger children. The old state capitol building is a short walk away.

    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • sambarnett's Profile Photo

    Scenic Overlook

    by sambarnett Written Aug 29, 2003

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    view

    Not quite as good as the view from Frankfort Cemetery, but this scenic overlook on US 60 east of town offers a well framed view of the capitol building. The rest of Frankfort is obscured by thick groves of trees.

    Was this review helpful?

Instant Answers: Frankfort

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

79 travelers online now

Comments

Frankfort Things to Do

Reviews and photos of Frankfort things to do posted by real travelers and locals. The best tips for Frankfort sightseeing.

View all Frankfort hotels