Lincoln Memorial National Historic Park Travel Guide

  • Tree
    Tree "timeline"
    by grandmaR
  • Construction details of a log cabin
    Construction details of a log cabin
    by grandmaR
  • Front of the memorial building
    Front of the memorial building
    by grandmaR

Lincoln Memorial National Historic Park Things to Do

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    Tree 4 more images

    by grandmaR Updated Jan 10, 2014

    It is always a good idea to go to the Visitor's Center of any National Park. There is usually a movie to watch which tells a lot of interesting information about the park and there was one in this case.

    When we were there, there was a slice of a tree with the rings labeled with dates of Lincoln's life. There was a white oak on the north boundary of the farm, and it was about 28 years old on the date of Lincoln's birth. There was a picture of the Boundary Oak as it looked when it stood.

    There was also a model of part of the cabin which is up in the main building, so you can see the inside or it. There was also a diagram of how a log cabin is constructed

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    • National/State Park
    • Architecture

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    Looking down into the spring 4 more images

    by grandmaR Updated Dec 11, 2009

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    A few months before Lincoln was born his parents and sister moved from nearby Elizabethtown to the property, known as Sinking Spring Farm. His father paid $200 for 348 acres of stony ground on the south fork of Nolin Creek.. However, Lincoln did not remember living on the farm because his family moved down the road to Knob Creek Farm when he was only two years old.

    The farm's name came from a spring on the property which emerged from a deep cave, still visible today. Bob walked down into the spring, but I stayed at the top. Sinking Spring was the water source for the Lincoln Family

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    • Eco-Tourism
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    Front of the memorial building 4 more images

    by grandmaR Updated Dec 11, 2009

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    This neoclassical granite and marble structure designed by architect John Russell Pope -- a sort of Greek temple in the Kentucky woods was built to house a reconstructed cabin like one where Lincoln wa born. Fifty-six steps, one for each year of Lincoln's life, lead to the huge double front doors. We went around by the side (photo 2) because I didn't want to climb all the steps.

    The one-room cabin that is inside does reflect Lincoln's humble beginnings although it may be smaller than the original. It includes one door (photo 5) and window, a stone fireplace, and dirt floor.

    Beside the entrance to the memorial building is inscribed, "Here over the log cabin where Abraham Lincoln was born, destined to preserve the Union and free the slave, a grateful people have dedicated this memorial to unity, peace, and brotherhood among the states."

    This historic site is free of charge and open daily between 8 a.m. and 6:45 p.m. Memorial Day through Labor Day and 8 a.m. to 4:45 p.m. Labor Day through Memorial Day.

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    • National/State Park
    • Historical Travel

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Lincoln Memorial National Historic Park Shopping

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    Gift shop items 4 more images

    by grandmaR Updated Jan 10, 2014

    This is the usual type of National Park Service bookstore. They sell things like a magnet or patch of of the building, a Lincoln Birthplace Christmas Tree ornament for about $15.00. And they had cookbooks and coloring books and so on.

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Lincoln Memorial National Historic Park Warnings and Dangers

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    Steps in front of the memorial building 4 more images

    by grandmaR Written May 23, 2006

    The steps up to the memorial building represent the years of Lincoln's life. But there is access for people in wheelchairs. There is a walkway from the back of the visitor's center to the side of the building. We met a lady pushing a wheelchair when we were walking on the walkway.

    There is, however, no way to get down to the Sinking Spring without going down steps. I only took a picture of that from the top.

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    • National/State Park
    • Architecture

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