Baton Rouge Off The Beaten Path

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Most Recent Off The Beaten Path in Baton Rouge

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    laura plantation

    by doug48 Updated Sep 16, 2012

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    laura plantation

    laura plantation was originally owned by andre neau in 1755 and is an excellent example of a creole plantation. the raised creole plantation house was built in 1820. in 1891 laura locoul sold the plantation to florian waguespack and designated in the deed that the plantation was to be forever called "laura". laura plantation has an interesting collection of out buildings and slave cabins. laura plantation is listed on the national register of historic places and is open to the public.
    laura plantation is located between baton rouge and new orleans on highway 18 near vacherie LA.

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  • Angola State Prison Rodeo

    by SuburbanNomad Written Oct 20, 2011
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    If you haven’t been to the Angola State Prison Rodeo yet, you need to place it at the top of your ‘to do’ list. Reflecting back on my day spent here, it’s hard to recall any event which I’ve attended that came close to this level of enjoyment.

    The rodeo includes not only bull and bronco riding, but also sale of goods produced by the inmates! It only happens on Sundays in October, but it is well worth planning your trip around it.

    Find out more at my blog, http://blog.suburbannomad.com

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    LSU Higland Park Observatory

    by Jmill42 Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    The Observatory

    Used by LSU's Department of Astronomy, this building is also open to the public. There are monthly and special occasion events scheduled, so check out their website for any interesting celestial dates.

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    louisiana state penitentiary museum

    by doug48 Updated Jun 13, 2009

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    angola prison museum

    the louisiana state penitentiary museum is located at the main gate to the prison near the town of tunica. this interesting museum has displays on famous inmates, confiscated weapons, movie posters, and other angola photos and relics. a very interesting museum to visit in north central louisiana. from baton rouge take US 61 north to tunica. the prison is at the western end of river road just west of the town of tunica. admission is free.

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    nottoway plantation

    by doug48 Updated May 21, 2009

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    nottoway plantation

    nottoway plantation is one of the largest plantation homes in louisiana. the house is 53,000 square feet and has 64 rooms. the plantation house was designed by architect henry howard in the italianate style. the house was built for john hampden randolph in 1858. prior to the civil war nottoway plantation had 6,200 acres and 155 slaves. open to the public by appointment. call 225-545-3730.
    nottoway planation is located between baton rouge and new orleans at 30970 hwy 405 near white castle LA.

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    tezcuco plantation

    by doug48 Updated May 18, 2009

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    ruins of tezcuco

    tezcuco plantation was built in 1855 by benjamin tureaund. tezcuco was originally a raised creole plantation house with greek revival accents. sadly this beautiful and historic home was destroyed by fire in 2002. it is still worth a stop to see the the ruins of the plantation house. not open to the public.
    tezcuco plantation is located between baton rouge and new orleans on state highway 44 near darrow LA.

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    st. joseph plantation

    by doug48 Written May 18, 2009

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    st. joseph plantation

    st. joseph plantation is an excellent example of a louisiana sugar cane plantation. the raised creole plantaion house was built in 1830. this 2,800 acre plantation has an interesting collection of out buildings and slave cabins. st. joseph plantation is listed on the national register of historic places and is open to the public.
    st. joseph plantation is located between baton rouge and new orleans at 3535 state road 18 near vacherie LA.

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    evergreen plantation

    by doug48 Updated May 18, 2009

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    evergree plantation

    evergreen plantation was originally a creole farm house. it was completely remodeled in 1832 by pierre becnel in the greek revival style. in the 1860's it was owned by lenzin becnel who owned 103 slaves. evergreen is listed on the national register of historic places. evergreen plantation is open to the public by appointment. call 504-201-3108.
    evergreen plantation is located between baton rouge and new orleans on state road 18 near wallace LA.

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    oak alley plantation

    by doug48 Updated May 18, 2009

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    oak alley plantation

    oak alley is one of the most visited plantations on the "river road". originally called bon sejour it was built by george swainey in 1839. this greek revival plantation house is known for it's 28 doric columns that encircle the house. oak alley gets it's name from the double row of live oak trees that were planted prior to 1837. oak alley is listed on the national register of historic places.
    oak alley is located between baton rouge and new orleans at 3645 state road 18 near vacherie LA.

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    greenwood plantation

    by doug48 Updated May 16, 2009

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    greenwood plantation

    greenwood plantation is located about 30 miles north of baton rouge on US 61. this beautiful plantation home was built by william ruffin barrow in 1830 on a 3,000 acre cotton plantation. by the 1850's greenwood had expanded to 12,000 acres and had 750 slaves. in the late 1850's barrow became a politician who pushed for succession from the union. barrow died in 1862. after the civil war the reconstruction government forced the barrow family to sell the plantation. because of radical reconstruction after the civil war greenwood was unprofitable and had a number of owners. frank perry bought greenwood in 1915 and in 1940 opened it to the public. in 1960 the plantation house was hit by lightning and the house was not reopened to the public until 1983. today greenwood is owned by the barnes family and is operated as a historic attraction and a bed & breakfast inn. a very interesting side trip when in baton rouge.
    directions take US 61 north past st. francisville then left on highland road. see the attached web site for more information.

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    Plaquamine Locks

    by grandmaR Updated Jan 21, 2009

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    One end of the lock
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    Louisiana State Historic Site.

    Hours of Operation: 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., daily. Closed on Thanksgiving, Christmas and New Year's Day. Guided tours are offered daily.

    Entrance Fees: $2 per person; free for seniors (62 and over) and for children age 12 and under

    Bob didn't know that seniors were free, and when the ranger gave us a receipt to show that we had checked in (the site is pretty open), Bob asked how much it was, and the ranger said he had just assumed that we were seniors.

    We had a very interesting talk from the ranger. He told us that the lock was designed by Colonel George W. Goethals (1858-1928), the assistant to the chief engineer of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Goethals later gained distinction as chairman and chief engineer of the Isthmian Canal Commission for the design and construction of the Panama Canal. However, there were significant engineering challenges to its construction because the designers did not take Louisiana geology into account. When completed in 1909, the lock was significant for having the highest fresh water lift of any lock in the world -- 51 feet -- and a unique engineering design that utilized a gravity flow principle.

    After we saw the little movie (on the TV/VCR) the ranger led us around the musum in the lockhouse and showed us the exhibits. (photo 3 and 4) Among other things, he told us that the Gary James Hebert Memorial Lockhouse, which serves as a museum and visitors center was faced with white ceramic bricks (photo 2) so it could be seen at a distance. They switched away from coal heat because the coal soot dimmed the luster of the bricks. Gary Hebert worked to keep the lockhouse from being destroyed by the Corps of Engineers, and to have it preserved as a historic site-that's why it is named for him.

    Afterwards I went outside and took some more photos (photo 5). There is still water in one end of the lock, but the other end is grass lawn.

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    Port Allen Locks

    by grandmaR Updated Mar 4, 2008

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    Tub and barges in the lock
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    Since it wasn't far to Shreveport, I decided to go see the Plaquemine Locks, which are a historic landmark. But I was confused by the signs and when we came to one that said "Port Allen Locks (about 0930) and Bob asked if that was it, I said yes.

    This turned out to be a working lock on the Red River - the one that had replaced the Plaquemine Lock. We were just in time to watch a tug with some barges lock down to the canal. The canal shortens the distance to the Gulf of Mexico by approximately 120 miles. Photo 3 shows the tug just entering the lock. The guy who was running things explained everything because of course we had a lot of questions. He called on the radio to the boats waiting out on the river to go through (photo 2).

    After the lock gates closed (photo 5), the tug crew put a line over the bollards in the side of the lock (photo 4). There was one at the front of the barges and one at the rear. This keeps the barges and tug from hitting the lock walls. The bollards go up and down with the water, so it was not necessary to change the length of the lines as the water was let out of the lock.

    Port Allen is serviced by Interstate 10 and US Highway 190, both of which intersect with LA Highways 1 and 415. It is free

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    Rural Life Museum at LSU

    by grandmaR Updated Feb 22, 2008

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    Overseer's house
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    Our admission as seniors was $6.00 each. There was a film, which they accidentally showed to us in French (it is in four languages). I could kind of understand it but not in time to translate for Bob. The admissions person (who was an LSU student from Poland) mentioned that we could walk to a nearby plantation and I asked if there were wheelchairs. He said there were motorized wheelchairs and a scooter, so I opted for the scooter, which I thought looked like fun (and was)

    First we looked at the actual museum part which included some funeral carriages with a couple of cast iron coffins.

    After that I scooted on my scooter out into the outdoor part of the museum which was mostly various types of buildings brought from other places. A schoolhouse, store, dove cote, slave cabins, overseer's house, church, etc.

    At one point, I got stuck on the gravel path and was spinning my wheels and had to get off an push. I also was not sure the scooter would fit on a little wooden bridge, so I went around the other way.

    I met Bob in the graveyard (which was just markers from other places kind of scattered around) and he said "I might have known I would find you in the cemetery".

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    Nottoway-White Castle La

    by BruceDunning Written Oct 21, 2007

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    Infamous home-estate brochure
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    It was completed in 1859 by John Randolph. The home has 53,000 Sf and once had 7,000 acres of land growing sugar. The decline was traumatic for Randolph who died during the war and the family all were broke afterword; 11 children.

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    Greenwood in St. Francisville

    by BruceDunning Written Oct 21, 2007

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    map to the home
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    This is a beautiful restoration project that has been ongoing for nearly 10 years. The plantation home burned down. The property was purchased by the dad of the now owner and he is hanging on from tour charges, barely. A real nice guy and proud of the work done. It is a realisitic looking replica.
    The plantation once has 12,000 acres and grew cotton and sugar. It now has about 1,000 acres. The Barrows from the area constructed in 1830, and they flaunted the wealth. Barrow's daughter, Martha married into the Turnbull's and became known for the Rosedown. Small world down here.

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Baton Rouge Off The Beaten Path

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