Rural Life Museum, Baton Rouge

4.5 out of 5 stars 10 Reviews

Been here? Rate It!

hide
  • 19 th century hearse
    19 th century hearse
    by doug48
  • slave cabin
    slave cabin
    by doug48
  • Pioneer Cabin
    Pioneer Cabin
    by Basaic
  • Basaic's Profile Photo

    RLM: Salvery and Just After

    by Basaic Written Mar 10, 2015

    The last group of buildings I would like to highlight are the ones reflecting the lives of slaves and those who remained on the plantations after slavery was abolished. Photo 1 is a typical slave cabin. The slaves lived in here with little more than a pallet with straw as a bed and maybe a crude handmade chair. Photo 2 is the typical home for a plantation worker after slavery was abolished. There is little difference except the former slaves can now save up and buy more furniture like a real bed. Photo 3 is of the sick house. This was little more than a building where the sick or injured slaves went and was typically very poorly equipped. Photo 4 is of the kitchen. The kitchen was usually outside the main house to keep the heat from the kitchen from making the whole house hot and to make sure that if the kitchen catches fire it does not burn down the whole house. Photo 5 is the Overseer's House. The overseer supervised the work and sometimes the discipline of the slaves. Note how much better his home was than that of the typical slave.

    Slave Cabin Plantation Workers Cabin Sick House Kitchen Overseer's House
    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Historical Travel
    • Museum Visits

    Was this review helpful?

  • Basaic's Profile Photo

    RLM: Acadian, Creole and Other Homes

    by Basaic Written Mar 10, 2015

    The second group of structures I would like to highlight are different types of homes that were once common to the area. Photo 1 is the Jean Charles Germain Bergeron Home which was built sometime prior to 1805 and is thought to be the oldest Acadian style home in the state. Photo 2 is a Pioneer Cabin with outbuildings from 1810. Photo 3 is a Dogtrot Cabin from 1863. Photo 4 is Shotgun House commonly used to house sharecroppers on old plantations after the end of slavery. Photo 5 is a slightly newer Acadian home. Note the stairs from the porch going up to the boys sleeping area.

    Berheron House Pioneer Cabin Dogtrot Cabin Shotgun House Acadian Home
    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Historical Travel
    • Museum Visits

    Was this review helpful?

  • Basaic's Profile Photo

    RLM: Community Buildings

    by Basaic Written Mar 9, 2015

    There are approximately 30 buildings on the site reflecting a variety of lifestyles in rural southern Louisiana. but mostly poorer areas. I thought I would show some of these buildings. The first group is buildings that help form a community. I will start with a neat old wooden Gothic Revival Church from 1893; an 1850 jail (just in case the church didn't keep you out of trouble); a Blacksmith Shop; a General Store and a School.

    Church Jail Blacksmith's Shop General Store School
    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Museum Visits
    • Family Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Basaic's Profile Photo

    Windrush Plantation House

    by Basaic Written Mar 7, 2015

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Windrush Plantation House was built by John Charles Burden in 1850 for his wife and family. Burden came here from England and established a successful plantation on the edge of Baton Rouge. The name of the plantation comes from a small river that ran by Burden's childhood home in England. Today the plantation house is restored to its former glory and is connected with the Rural Life Museum. For an additional $3 you can wander through the gardens and see the plantation house (if it is open).

    Windrush Plantation House Dining Area Entrance Hall Bedroom Windrush Gardens
    Related to:
    • Museum Visits
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • Basaic's Profile Photo

    Rural Life Museum

    by Basaic Written Mar 7, 2015

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Louisiana State University Rural Life Museum consists of a very large collection of old furniture, sculptures, household items, and other memorabilia showing the history and life in the state from the plantation days and the early Acadian Settlers. There are also a collection of over 20 buildings that show Plantation Life; Creole and Acadian Style Buildings and Rural life in the South. There is also a gift shop that has nostalgic items and art available. Hours are 8 AM to 5 PM daily (closed major holidays). Admission is $9 for adults 12 to 61; $8 for seniors and kids 5 to 11; and free for kids under 5.

    Rural Life Museum 1927 Franklin Displays Carriages and Wagons Statue
    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Museum Visits
    • Family Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Basaic's Profile Photo

    Uncle Jack Statue

    by Basaic Written Mar 7, 2015

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    In 1926, Natchitoches banker Jackson L. Bryan decided to commission a sculpture "dedicated to the faithful service of black people who played an instrumental role in the building of Louisiana". He paid famous sculptor Hans Schuler, Sr. (the first American to win a Gold Medal at the 1901 Paris Salon) $4300 for this bronze statue. The statue made its debut in 1927 at the foot of Front Street in Natchitoches (which is where all the best hotels and restaurants were at the time). The statue quickly became famous and was written up in numerous newspapers and magazines including National Geographic. The statue was the center of a lot of controversy even before it was cast. Many thought that the White Community in Natchitoches would not accept a statue of a black in their town especially since it would be the ONLY statue in town. Bryan continued on. In 1968 many blacks objected to the statue saying it was not a "positive symbol" and demanded the city remove it. The statue came down later that year and was taken to the Bryan Family Farm. In 1972 the statue was obtained by Louisiana State University and in 1974 it was erected on the grounds of the Rural Life Museum.

    Uncle Jack Uncle Jack Closer View
    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Historical Travel
    • Arts and Culture

    Was this review helpful?

  • doug48's Profile Photo

    LSU rural life museum

    by doug48 Updated Apr 4, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    the LSU rural life museum is an excellent place to experience what louisiana was like in the 1800's. the museum has an excellent collection of relics of life in rural louisiana. the star attraction of the museum is it's collection of 19th century hearses and cast iron coffins. on the grounds of the museum is a collection of over 25 19th century buildings. for those interested in history and southern culture the rural life museum is a very worth while stop in baton rouge.

    19 th century hearse
    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Museum Visits
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • Basaic's Profile Photo

    Windrush Gardens Statues

    by Basaic Written Mar 7, 2015

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    As you wander through the gardens notice all the nice sculptures mingling with the flowers. Very well landscaped.

    Statue Statue Statue Statue Statue
    Related to:
    • Museum Visits
    • Arts and Culture
    • Family Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • doug48's Profile Photo

    LSU rural life museum

    by doug48 Updated Apr 4, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    pictured is one three plantation slave cabins on the grounds of the rural life museum. for more pictures of the interesting buildings of the rural life museum see my rural life travelogue.

    slave cabin
    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Museum Visits
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Virtuous_Tourist's Profile Photo

    Windrush Gardens at the Rural Life Museum

    by Virtuous_Tourist Written May 1, 2005

    This landscaped area adjacent to the Rural Life Museum has an impressive collection of roses and other flora.

    Was this review helpful?

Instant Answers: Baton Rouge

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

26 travelers online now

Comments (1)

  • Basaic's Profile Photo
    Mar 10, 2015 at 1:25 PM

    I have many more photos of the Rural Life Museum if anyone is interested.

Hotels Near Rural Life Museum
4.5 out of 5 stars
1 Review
0.1 miles away
Show Prices
Show Prices
Show Prices

View all Baton Rouge hotels