Garden District Travel Guide

  • House opposite Uglesich
    House opposite Uglesich
    by grandmaR
  • Taken from the St. Charles streetcar
    Taken from the St. Charles streetcar
    by grandmaR
  • Audubon Park
    Audubon Park
    by grandmaR

Garden District Things to Do

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    Audubon Park

    by grandmaR Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    You can go to the zoo by riding the John James Audubon up the river 7 miles from the Aquarium. But you can also take the St. Charles streetcar. The zoo is in Audubon Park. This park is privately owned - it is not a national, state or city park. The entrance on St. Charles Avenue designed by John Charles Olmsted was built by the Audubon Commission over three quarters of a century ago. In 1884 this park was the site of the World’s Fair including a building covering 30 acres.

    Both the zoo and the aquarium have a white aligator, and the zoo and the aquarium have a combined ticket if you want to compare them.
    Ticket Prices: Zoo only Aquarium + Zoo
    Adult: $12 $22
    Child (2-12): $7 $14
    Senior (65+): $9 $18

    The Zoo opens 7 days a week at 9:30 am except for:

    Mardi Gras day, the first Friday in May, Thanksgiving day and Christmas day.

    Summer Hours: (April 2 to November 5, 2005)

    weekdays — 9:30 am to 5:00 pm (last ticket sold at 4:00 pm)
    weekends — 9:30 am to 6:00 pm (last ticket sold at 5:00 pm)

    Winter Hours: (November 6, 2004 to April 1, 2005)

    Monday thru Sunday— 9:30 am to 5:00 pm
    (last ticket sold at 4:00 pm)

    Related to:
    • Trains
    • Zoo
    • Arts and Culture

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    Tombs in St. Louis #3

    by grandmaR Written Jul 8, 2005

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    If I was in better shape, I'd do walking tour like this one that Lee W. Nelson has (with photos) on his iNetTours.com website.

    Start a block from St. Charles avenue at 2340 Prytania St. Go down First (away from St. Charles) to the former home of Archie and Peyton Manning (quarterbacks must run in the Manning family).

    Cross Coliseum St... a double-galleried town house at 1331 First Street .. built in the 1860's ... down Coliseum Street toward Philip Street ..to a row of eight shotgun houses known as Coliseum Street Row or sometimes the Seven Sisters. (See my NOLA Architecture tip)..

    Back to First Street and ..[cross] Chestnut ..to the house that was Anne Rice's setting for her Witching Hour novels. She owns this house. If a long black limo is parked in front then she's 'at home'.

    The Rice family also owns Claiborne Cottage which she purchased in 1995 and used as the setting for her novel Violin. ..

    Continue on First to Magazine, then turn right and walk one block to Second Street. Go down Second Street to Camp. Turn left when you get back to Prytania

    ..the Women's Opera Guild House at 2504 Prytania Street. [and].. at 2523 Prytania Street is another house owned by Anne Rice. Once an active Catholic chapel the building is known as Our Mother of Perpetual Help Chapel.

    .. on your right just after you cross Third Street [is] the Briggs-Staub house, 2605 Prytania Street, has a matching Gothic guest house (built as servants quarters) that repeats the lines of the main cottage. The original owner - Charles Biggs employed Irish servants instead of slaves..

    Colonel Short's Villa, or the Short-Favrot House, just off Prytania Street at 1448 Fourth Street has a fence [like].. the Cornstalk Hotel..

    Lafayette Cemetery No. 1 is also in the Garden District. The entrance is on Washington Avenue between Prytania and Coliseum. I have no pictures of it, so this is a generic one from St. Louis #3

    Related to:
    • Budget Travel
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Architecture

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    Charles Street streetcar

    by grandmaR Updated Jul 8, 2005

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    One good and relatively cheap way to see the Garden District is from the national historic landmark St. Charles Streetcar which travels over 13 miles from Canal Street, through the Garden district, past Loyola and Tulane Universities and Audubon Park - 165 years ago, it was called the Carrollton Railroad and carried passengers between the French Quarter and the resort town of Carrollton. You can ride all the way to where it takes a right-hand turn at Riverbend to continue up Carrollton Avenue.

    There are some very lovely and famous Garden District Mansions (like the one with the famous corn fence) that are not on Saint Charles, but many of the sights are there. Plus you can go to the zoo.

    Related to:
    • Trains
    • Historical Travel
    • Budget Travel

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Garden District Restaurants

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    Uglesich's door

    by grandmaR Updated Apr 4, 2011

    I saw Uglesich's (pronounced YU-gul-sitch) profiled on Rachael Ray's $40/day TV show when it was in New Orleans. The restaurant is open only for lunch Monday through Friday, from 10:30 until four, and has a fan base that includes high-profile restaurateurs Emeril Lagasse, Susan Spicer and Frank Brigtsen. Each year, people fear he may close for his annual summer vacation and never reopen.

    I'm not sure if this 'counts' as being in the Garden District, but since you can get to it from the St. Charles streetcar, I'll include it because it is at 1200 block of Baronne St. about two blocks north of where the streetcar goes.

    We stood in line outside Uglesich's for only about 15 minutes, and then we gave our order, paid ($33.12), and waited for a table to be free. While we were waiting, we talked to Michael Rogers, the champion oyster shucker - with the awards he had won back of him on the wall and told him he should come and compete in Leonardtown at our Oyster Festival for the World Championship. We got there about noon, and were finished about 1:15.

    Favorite Dish: Specialties include: succulent shrimp stuffed with herbed lump crabmeat. Delicate sauteed oyster “shooters” drenched in a cane syrup/sun-dried tomato vinaigrette. Peerless grilled speckled trout or the spicy/tart shrimp Uggie, tinted red with three different chiles.

    At the hotel meeting, we were told that fried green tomatoes with shrimp remoulade sauce were a specialty, so that's what I got (upper right) and then I had Mama's shrimp pasta. Mama's pasta proved to have shrimp, artichokes and dried tomatoes and Parmesan cheese on spaghetti. Bob doesn't like green tomatoes so he got just the shrimp salad and the sauce (upper left). Also pictured is the counter with people waiting or paying (lower right), the front door with the line waiting to get in reflected in it (center) and on the lower left a part of someone else's lunch.

    Bigger pictures of our food are in my travelogue

    Related to:
    • Food and Dining
    • Seniors
    • Trains

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Garden District Warnings and Dangers

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    Beads in the trees 10 months later

    by grandmaR Updated Apr 4, 2011

    Around Mardi Gras time, you also have to know the parade times because there is NO PARKING two hours before and two hours after a parade.

    So you are better off to leave your car at home and fly in. We flew in and avoided the whole hassle by renting a car AFTER we visited New Orleans.

    A brochure entitled "Park Smart" shows the location of city parking areas and lots from the Department of Streets and during Mardi Gras should also be available from major hotels.

    - the blurry photo was taken from a moving vehicle along St. Charles, and there are beads in the tree in December, left over from the previous year's Mardi Gras

    Related to:
    • Luxury Travel
    • Festivals
    • School Holidays

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    Fare Box

    by grandmaR Updated Jul 8, 2005

    The fares for the streetcars are the same as for the buses - $1.25 in exact change (they will take dollar bills), or $5.00 for all day.

    Note that senior citizens (which we are) can ride for 40 cents with free transfers. This is cheaper than even the Visitor's pass

    Related to:
    • Trains
    • Historical Travel
    • Budget Travel

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  • Garden District Hotels

    0 Hotels in Garden District

Garden District Off The Beaten Path

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    Confederate Museum

    by grandmaR Updated Jul 8, 2005

    We rode the St. Charles streetcar to Lee Circle and got off and went to the D-Day Museum. I'm not sure if these museums 'count' as being in the Garden District, but we did get to them by the St. Charles streetcar.

    The museum pictured is the Confederate Museum which contains the second largest collection of Confederate memorabilia in the world in the oldest continually operating museum in Louisiana. It was founded in 1891 by Confederate veterens who have donated most of the materials such as uniforms, battle flags, guns, and pictures. They also have an online store.

    Hours
    10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
    Monday-Saturday (closed Sundays)
    Admission Charges

    $5.00Adults
    $4.00 Senior Citizens & students with a valid ID
    $2.00Children 12 & under

    We didn't go to this museum - instead we went to the D-Day museum across the street.

    I did not expect to enjoy this but it was VERY well done. There were two terrific movies - one about the D-Day invasion of Normandy (D-Day Remembered) and the other about the war in the Pacific (Price for Peace), including talking about the A-bomb. Each was about 45 minutes.

    They had personal stories from participants on both sides, and exhibits of things like war bonds, and various uniforms. We got there about 2:40 and they had to kick us out at 5:00.

    Open seven days a week 9:00 am - 5:00 pm.

    Adults (18 - 64) $14.00
    Seniors (65+) $8.00
    Students with ID $8.00
    Youths (Age 12 and under) $6.00
    Children under 5 FREE
    Active or Retired Military and Spouse with ID $6.00
    Military in Uniform FREE

    There is another museum planned across the street.

    Related to:
    • Road Trip
    • Family Travel
    • Museum Visits

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Garden District Favorites

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    Audubon Place gatehouse

    by grandmaR Updated Jul 16, 2005

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    Favorite thing: Audubon Place of St. Charles Street is a "residential park" dating from 1894. The original sale price for lots was about $5,000.

    There were 28 lots for sale, and the developers stipulated, among other things, that each house must cost more than $7,000 and must face Audubon Place Park, the neutral ground.

    The street is private.

    Most of the original homes built after 1900. Some of them have been burned down and replaced. All of them have been sold at least once to an outsider.

    Fondest memory: New Orleans Online says

    Audubon Place is the end product of the City Beautiful movement. As a private street, it is guarded by twin stone gatehouses bridged by a curved iron truss bearing the name of the street. Worth seeing on foot or bicycle for its large, though not particularly noteworty homes among their homogeneous setting of oaks, palms, and azaleas. Probably the most prestigious street in town. (The guard keeps a small T.V. going in the right hand gatehouse when things are slow.)

    Related to:
    • Luxury Travel
    • Architecture
    • Trains

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    St. Charles line historic plaque on Lee Circle

    by grandmaR Updated Jul 8, 2005

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    Favorite thing: ST. CHARLES LINE

    The New Orleans Carrollton R.R. Co. began passenger train service on September 26, 1835. Steam-powered trains and mule-drawn cars transported New Orleanians between Canal and Carollton via St. Charles Avenue.

    Improved technology led to the development of electric traction streetcars. The St. Charles line was the first electrified route, opening on February 1, 1893. By 1900, the single line had grown to be 28 lines running over 178 miles.

    New Orleans first and last streetcar route, the St. Charles Avenue line, is the world's oldest operating streetcar line.

    Related to:
    • Budget Travel
    • Family Travel
    • Historical Travel

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