Lafayette Things to Do

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Best Rated Things to Do in Lafayette

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    Avery Island

    by BarryAir Written Aug 20, 2004

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    BUDDA

    Avery Island is a must see if you visit Lafayette, its straight south on the Coast in Vermillion Bay. There is a free tour in the Tabasco hot pepper factory and all kinds of floura and fauna with tons of imported bamboos. Also a Huge BUDDA looking out to the Gulf Of Mexico.

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    Vermillionville

    by Helga67 Updated May 23, 2003

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    Vermilionville, Lafayette

    Vermilionville is the original name of the modern-day city of Lafayette, the self-proclaimed capital of Cajun Louisiana; it also is the name of a living history museum and folklife village located in same city.
    Vermilionville is a great place to learn more about the Cajun people and their way of living. It's a 23-acre Cajun and Creole heritage & folklife park with 5 restored original historic homes and 12 reproductions. Visit the historical houses, see the costumed craftspeople making art, listen to authentic Zydeco music or watch a traditional Cajun cooking demo.

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    Vermillionville: Visitors Center

    by Basaic Written Jan 13, 2010

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    Visitors Center/Gift Shop

    Vermillionville is a kind of living history museum designed to preserve the folklife and culture of the Attakapas area between 1765 and 1890. The area was home to many Creole and Cajun settlers that formed lively, close-knit communities with a vibrant culture. The park is laid out like an historic village, contain eighteen structures, including six restored original homes. In many of the structures, costumed interpreters demonstrate traditional crafts or musical styles. I really enjoyed my visit here. The Visitors Center is designed after a Creole plantation house, and contains a nice gift shop. Pick up the Interpretive Walking Tour Map and enjoy! Vermilionville is open Tuesday through Sunday from 10 AM to 4 PM. Admission is $8.00 for Adults; $6.50 for Seniors (65+ years); and $5.00 for kids 6 to 18; children under 6 are damitted free.

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    Vermillionville: Bayous

    by Basaic Written Jan 13, 2010

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    Bayou Vermillion
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    The water and swamp areas of this part of Louisiana attracted the Creole and Cajun settlers. Vermillionville is appropriately located on the Bayou Vermillion and Petit Bayou. The abundance of water also gives a home to the many beautiful plants used to landscape the grounds. The Interpretive Walking Tour brochure also names the plants you will see as you walk through.

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    Vermillionville: Houses

    by Basaic Updated Jan 13, 2010

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    Beau Bassin
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    Vermillionville has a number of authentically recreated houses from the early settlement of Creole and Cajun people in the area. The houses have been recreated as close as possible to the original designs using the same materials. The Beau Bassin House was built in 1840 and used a combination of Creole and Greek Revival architecture. The Fausse Point Home was once the home of Amand Brossard son of the Acadian Resistance Fighter Joseph Broussard. The Maison Boucvalt is a classic Acadian small house design. The Maison Mouton is a reconstruction of a four room homw from 1810. The oldest home in the park is the Maison Buller from 1803.

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    Vermillionville: Displays inside Houses

    by Basaic Written Jan 13, 2010

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    150 year old Acadian Loom
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    Inside the houses are numerous household items from the period showing what life was like in the area during this time. People in period costume are in many of the houses to explain how the items work and how the Creole and Cajun settlers lived. Many of the houses also have equipment showing how the artisans worked with wood, leather, and metals to make items for the houses, farming and art. The first photo shows a weaving loom from around 1850.

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    Vermillionville: Chapelle

    by Basaic Written Jan 13, 2010

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    Chapel
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    The Chapelle des Attakapas is a reproduction of the Catholic Churches at Pointe Coupee (1760) and St Martnville (1773). Religion played an important part in the Acadian lifestyle and the church was a focal point of the community.

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    Vermillionville: Education

    by Basaic Written Jan 13, 2010

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    Schoolhouse
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    Another thing emphasized by the early Acadian settlers was education. Vermillionville has recreated a schoolhouse along with a cooking school for learning how to prepare those tasty Creole/Cajun dishes.

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    Vermillionville: Music

    by Basaic Written Jan 13, 2010

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    Music Building
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    The Acadian settlers also had a strong love for music. Creole and Cajun music is great to listen to and is frequently very lively. The guy I met here playing music. D'Jalma. plays in a band called Jeffery Broussard and the Creole Cowboys. Check out their CD. There is also a Performance Center on site where they have concerts, dances, poetry readings, perform plays and other cultural attractions.

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  • Travlee

    by Travlee Written Jan 19, 2004

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    I have lived in Lafayette my whole life and this is truly a great place! Mardi Gras is absolutely one of the cannot miss activites here!

    Our Mardi Gras is second only to New Orleans! We have parades the Friday, Saturday, Monday and of course Mardi Gras Day! Mardi Gras in Lafayette is alot more family oriented so you don't have all the flashing and nudity to deal with. However it is just as much fun!!! There are alot of throws and we have a huge carnival with a bandstand that plays all different types of music. My in-laws came to Mardi Gras from Kansas last year and they just had a blast!!! If you want to come and spend Mardi Gras with us though you need to book your Hotel early because they run out of rooms every year.

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  • Travlee

    by Travlee Updated Jan 19, 2004

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    Lafayette is known for its terrific festivals. Three of the most famous:

    Crawfish Festival: This festival is actually just a few minutes away from Lafayette in Breaux Bridge Louisiana and takes place the first weekend in May each year. This festival is one of the largest and the crowds are very large. Crawfish dishes of every kind imaginable are served. There is also a heavy dose of great cajun music and culture.

    Festival International de Louisiane is held the last weekend in April every year in downtown Lafayette. Entertainment from all over the world converges in Lafayette for a huge party. Food, music and fun from all over the world.

    Festival Acadien is held in Mid-September in Girard Park in Lafayette. This festival truly embodies all that is Cajun. This is actually a music, food and cajun cultural arts festival combined into one. The best foods, bands and crafts are here all in one place.

    Book hotel rooms in advance for any of these because they run out easily!!! Come on down cher and pass a good time with us!

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    L'Académie de Vermilionville

    by Helga67 Updated May 23, 2003

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    Schoolhouse, Vermilionville

    In this schoolhouse, you may see the lines "I will not speak French in school", on the blackboard recalling the time in the early 20th century when Louisiana law forbade the speaking of Southwest Louisiana's principal language.

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    Le Magasin

    by Helga67 Updated May 23, 2003

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    Le Magasin

    This replica of an Acadian barn features crucial early survival skills: boat building, net and trap making, and decoy carving.
    Early Acadians lived near water and used the bayous for transportation, for communication, for hunting and fishing.

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    Cajun houses

    by Helga67 Updated May 23, 2003

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    Cajun house

    On this pic, you can see the schoolhouse (left) and Beau Bassin (right). They are a blend of Creole and American Greek Revival styles.
    Spinning, weaving, quilting, and textile crafts are demonstrated in Beau Bassin.

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    La Chapelle des Attakapas

    by Helga67 Updated May 23, 2003

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    Church, Vermilionville

    This is a reproduction based on the Catholic church at St. Martinville.
    The Acadians were Roman Catholics and Catholicism was the only religion legally allowed to be practiced in Louisiana before the Louisiana Purchase in 1803.

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Lafayette Things to Do

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