Monroe Off The Beaten Path

  • Off The Beaten Path
    by turnip2000
  • King Cotton
    King Cotton
    by Small_World
  • Off The Beaten Path
    by turnip2000

Most Recent Off The Beaten Path in Monroe

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    Amphibian Museum

    by turnip2000 Written Aug 24, 2006

    You will not believe this, but I actually went to this and I doubt most in the parish even know about this: The collection of amphibians and reptiles is one of the largest in the United States. It now contains about 55,000 specimens of approximately 900 species and subspecies. Most specimens are from the central and southeastern United States. Exotic taxa are represented by collections from Korea, Viet Nam, Europe, South America, China, Japan and Mexico. Just go to the ULM campus and you can walk through: Although primarily a research facility, the Division of Zoology offers tours for students and other interested parties. The collections are housed in Garrett and Hanna Halls on the campus of the University of Louisiana at Monroe. As a part of the Division's educational service to the community, an annual seminar series is now offered featuring natural history research of interest to the public.

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    D'Arbonne National Wildlife Refuge

    by turnip2000 Written Aug 24, 2006
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    This lake is located in the piney hills area of Louisiana and is a place where you can get away from it all...I mean ALL...The water is a bit murky and you might have a bit of mud in your hair after skiing, but nobody cares. Farmerville itself is a pit in all honesty, but they do have a Johnny's pizza! Here is a brief description from the park service: Piney forests, rolling hills, five fishing piers, and a beautiful lake draw visitors to this quiet, majestic state park. Designed to keep the focus on nature, park facilities blend with the natural landscape to enhance the outdoor experience of this 655-acre park.

    The visitors center, swimming pool and tennis complex provide a starting point for your day in the park. Guests can choose from 65 improved campsites, eighteen (18) vacation cabins, two (2) lodges and a group camp that sleeps 52 for overnight stays. Playground areas are found in both the day-use and overnight camping areas.

    Fishing piers and boat docks attract visitors to Lake D'Arbonne, the marvelous 15,250-acre centerpiece of the park. Recreation on Lake D'Arbonne is tremendously popular among locals and visitors, and record catches of bass, crappie, catfish and bream make Lake D'Arbonne a fishing haven. Wide open areas of the lake, about seven miles from the park, appeal to water skiers and pleasure boaters. The boat launch at the park opens up all of these opportunities to outdoorsmen.
    Camping:
    The park's 65 campsites are all equipped with water and electricity and a nearby comfort station equipped with restroom and shower facilities as well as an adjacent washeteria to make your visit to Lake D'Arbonne pleasant and comfortable. The camping area is nestled in the woods near the lake and has its own fishing pier.

    located on Evergreen Rd. off La. 2. From Ruston, take La. 33 north to Farmerville, then west on La. 2 to Evergreen Rd. Go left one-third of a mile on Evergreen Rd. to the park. To reserve a campsite or picnic pavilion, call 1-877-CAMP-N-LA toll free (877-226-7652).

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    1730 BC!

    by turnip2000 Written Aug 24, 2006

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    Poverty Point, known for its mound construction, is an archaeological site in northeastern Louisiana (near the town of Epps), overlooking the Mississippi River flood plain. The name derives from the Poverty Point plantation, which included the site's land in modern times. It was constructed c. 1730 BC–1350 BC by American Indians of the archaic Poverty Point culture that inhabited the Mississippi Delta at that time, and continued to develop further in the centuries to come.The earthen structures were built and enlarged for centuries, with the site reaching its final form at about 1000 BCE. It is referred to by some as the first true city of North America, although the population is unlikely to have exceeded 2000 individuals at any time.

    There is a nice visitors center and if you like this type of history, you will enjoy yourself...pick a "not so" hot day. Tram tours are given daily at 9:30 a.m., 11 a.m., 12:30 p.m., 2 p.m. and 3:30, from March 1 through October 31.

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    The Land of Cotton

    by Small_World Updated Jul 9, 2005

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    King Cotton

    Some friends of mine from up north came to visit in September and wanted to know where all the snow went. They were certain they had seen some as they looked out the window of the airplane, and when they landed it was nowhere to be found. Not only that, but the temperature outside was 90 degrees.

    What they saw from the air were acres and acres of cotton. Ouachita Parish has around 30,000 acres of it, and some surrounding parishes have 100,000 acres.

    Related to:
    • Farm Stay
    • Arts and Culture

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Monroe Off The Beaten Path

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