New Iberia Off The Beaten Path

  • Front of Oaklawn Manor 1960 needing paint
    Front of Oaklawn Manor 1960 needing...
    by grandmaR
  • Back of Oaklawn Manor needing paint
    Back of Oaklawn Manor needing paint
    by grandmaR
  • Watching the parade of boats
    Watching the parade of boats
    by grandmaR

Best Rated Off The Beaten Path in New Iberia

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    Bayou Teche "Boardwalk"

    by grandmaR Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Boardwalk below Bridge Street
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    The boardwalk runs along Bayou Teche beginning at the end of Weeks Street, behind Shadows-on-the-Teche, and continuing to Duperier Street Bridge.

    This short boardwalk has informational signs along its length that talk about the use of the Teche to float logs to market, and about the steamship history of New Iberia (last photo)

    The Lafayette paper had and article which said:

    "...the mallards swimming along the bank of the Bayou Teche. The ducks followed the bank along the wooden boardwalk without an audience.

    "An alligator painted onto a sign identifying the “Bayou Teche Boardwalk” appears to walk along the planked path that edges the bayou just a block off Main Street, next door to the historic antebellum home, Shadows-on-the-Teche. The boardwalk is lined with old-fashioned street lamps.

    "The walk follows the bayou to Duperier Street where the signals flash and the arms go down to warn the traffic that the bridge is about to open at Duperier Street. The bridge splits in half, raising on each side.

    "But the ducks are the only traffic in the water..."

    Related to:
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    • Historical Travel
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    The Bayou Teche Scenic Byway

    by grandmaR Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Bayou Teche section of the Louisiana Byways map

    There are little signs with red antique cars on them all over Louisiana marking Scenic Byways. The New Iberia website says:

    "The Bayou Teche Scenic Byway follows a meandering moss-draped, oak tree-lined course through lush vegetation into the geographical heart of Acadiana. Following closely along the banks of the region’s most popular waterway, this picturesque route provides a firsthand glimpse of Cajun culture. Thousands of years ago, the present course of the Bayou Teche was the main channel of the Mississippi River, so you’ll also get a unique geological perspective of how the rich agricultural lands on this route were formed."

    The Louisiana Byways website has the following suggestions for 'things to do' in the two parishes (counties) along this byway.

    St. Martin Parish

    * Mardi Gras. February. Throughout the Parish
    * Cypress Sawmill Festival. Mid-March. Patterson
    * Tri-City Fireman's Fair. Mother's Day weekend. Morgan City
    * Festival Sur la Teche. Fourth weekend in May. Franklin
    * Le Festival du Poisson Arme (Garfish Festival). May. Franklin
    * July Fourth Festivities. July Fourth. Throughout the parish
    * Louisiana Shrimp & Petroleum Festival. Labor Day weekend. Morgan City
    * Christmas Activities. December. Throughout the parish
    * Delta Tau Christmas Bazaar and Arts & Crafts Sale. First weekend in December. Morgan City

    Iberia Parish

    * Live Oak Gardens. New Iberia
    * Tabasco Country Store & Visitor Center. Avery Island
    * Konriko Company Store. New Iberia
    * Airboat Tours, Inc. Marshfield Boat Landing, near Loreauville
    * World Championship Gumbo Cookoff. October. New Iberia
    * Louisiana Sugar Cane Festival & Fair. September. New Iberia
    * Jeanerette Old Country Fair. September. Jeanerette

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Road Trip
    • Eco-Tourism

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    The Pretty Little Museum In Jeanerette

    by grandmaR Written Dec 25, 2004

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    Sugar exhibit in the museum
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    After we found the house we used to live in and ate lunch, we visited this museum right across from Lil's Kitchen

    It's billed as the ``Only Museum in Iberia Parish''

    View The Pictorial History of ``Sugar Cane to Sugar'' Tuesday Friday 10am-5pm Last tour begins at 4pm Saturday 10am-2pm Last tour begins at 1pm

    500 East Main Street (Highway 182) Jeanerette, Louisiana 70544

    Adult $ 3 00 Students $1 00

    It is certainly not a main-stream must see site, but we had a good time talking to the old lady in charge.

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    • Museum Visits
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  • Take a stroll among beautiful live oaks!

    by Tshoop Written Feb 25, 2003

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    Just go to city park and stroll down the hiking paths. Make sure to visit Devil's Pond in City park. Feed the ducks and check out some nutria. (Playgrounds, pool, recreation center, walking track, 2 softball fields, double sand volleyball court, picnic pavillions, meditation garden, gazebo, horseshoe pit, senior citizens building, public boat launch, 5 tennis courts)

    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking

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    Oaklawn Manor in Franklin

    by grandmaR Written Aug 22, 2009

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    Back of Oaklawn Manor needing paint
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    One of the little excursions we made was to a mansion in Franklin Louisiana called Oaklawn. At the time we visited, Oaklawn was in DIRE need of paint. I do not remember whether we went inside or just visited the gardens.

    The manor house (c 1837) was originally the home of an Irishman Alexander Porter who was successful politically and as a sugar planter, but not successful in leaving behind family members to inherit his plantation. His wife and all his children died before he did. After he died in 1844, the plantation was inherited by his brother who also died. After the Civil War, his brother's wife had to sell the house to a wealthy New Yorker. In the early 1920s the estate was bought by the Barbour family, restored and opened to the public. Unfortunately, Captain Barbour passed away in 1930; but his widow continued to live there for nearly thirty years. The Barbours' daughter, Lucile married Thomas J. Holms II, a man from Chicago, Illinois, and they returned to live there permanently in the 1950's. When we visited in 1960, it was when the Holms' were in charge.

    In 1963 (after our visit), Tom and Lucie sold Oaklawn to George B. Thomson, a young man form Crowley, Louisiana. He and his wife painted the exterior which required 500 gallons of paint. Just one year after the Thomsons moved in, hurricane Hilda cost the lives of 44 cedars along the property's Cedar Walk.

    Bob took my picture here but it is blurred because he did not realize that he had to hold the camera really still because of the shade on the Cedar Walk.

    Visitor Hours: 10:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m.
    Closed Mondays

    Admission: Adult: $10.00

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Arts and Culture
    • Museum Visits

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    Avery Island

    by grandmaR Updated Jun 13, 2006

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    Exhibit at the factory
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    Getting to Avery Island was easy - the road was paved and well signed. At LA 329 junction, turn right. Stay on LA 329 until you reach Avery Island. Bob remembers going halfway there and then turning around and coming home. We have been unable to figure out why.

    There is a toll booth to the island - Bob was surprised to have to pay 50 cents toll although I had told him about that. It's called an environmental fee. (Photo 3) They no longer give tours of the salt mine. It is now leased to Cargill.

    We went to the factory first, which was free. They have a tour every 20 minutes, and show a video tape about the McIllheny family and the production of Tabasco sauce. Then we get to go through the factory (which wasn't in operation because it was Saturday - photo 4). At the end they gave each of us a tiny bottle of Tabasco.

    Then we walked up to the store. I picked up a catalog so I could order stuff and not have to carry it. They had a fish sculpture outside painted in flames swallowing a hot pepper bait. His name was Ta Bass Co (photo 2). Apparently the local sculpture here is a fish (like the pandas in DC). They had some old photos of the old factory.

    Then we drove over to the "Jungle Gardens" and Bird Island part. This is supposed to be a fantastic garden with all kinds of wildlife and a very old Buddha. When we asked the girls in the store/visitor's center what it would cost, they said, "It's $6.50 per person, and there are no birds or alligators" in a very dismissive tone. They obviously thought it was not worth the money, although it is given a "Must See" kind of recommendation in the AAA book.

    So we took their word for it (I knew it had been too cold for the alligators to be out, and I figured I'd see them in the Everglades), and left without going. I took a picture of a white egret that was standing by the road on the way out.

    Related to:
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    • Road Trip
    • Eco-Tourism

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    Avery Island, home of the...

    by SeaBreezeUSA Updated Oct 14, 2002

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    Avery Island, home of the world famous 'Tabasco' sauce, has been produced for over 100 years. No self respecting 'cajun' would be found without his bottle of 'Louisiana's' best hot sauce!!

    See the travelogue under Avery Island for more information!!

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    Books by James Lee Burke

    by Shaft28 Written Jan 15, 2003

    Stop by Books on the Teche, a tiny local book store and pick up a book by James Lee Burke who writes detective/mystery novels based on the area. We picked up one and have since bought 3 more.
    Great reads, very descriptive and we've visited 1/2 the spots mentioned in the books!

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    Blessing of the Fleet

    by grandmaR Written Aug 23, 2009
    Watching the parade of boats

    Another thing we did one Sunday was to go down to Morgan City to watch the Blessing of the Shrimp Fleet.

    Related to:
    • Budget Travel
    • Festivals
    • Religious Travel

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    St. Martinsville

    by grandmaR Written Aug 23, 2009
    My friends ringing the bell in 1960

    A friend of mine and her sister-in-law and I visited St. Martinsville one afternoon. Bob didn't go so the first time he went was in 2004 when we re-visited New Iberia

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Arts and Culture
    • Museum Visits

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New Iberia Off The Beaten Path

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