New Iberia Things to Do

  • Things to Do
    by Madasabull
  • Things to Do
    by Madasabull
  • Things to Do
    by Madasabull

Most Recent Things to Do in New Iberia

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    New Iberia Historic Districts

    by Basaic Updated Apr 25, 2014

    New Iberia has one of the nicest historic districts in the state. A leisurely walk down West and East Main Street is like a stroll into the past. The downtown section has a number of buildings of historical and/or architectural interest. Gotta love these balconies!

    I will mention a few specific places in more detail.

    teach635@hotmail.com Bojangles Main Street
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    Oak Trees

    by Basaic Written Apr 25, 2014

    One of the great things you can see in the Southeast in general, and New Iberia in particular, are majestic oak trees laden with Spanish moss. Admittedly, this one does seem a bit sickly but there are some really nice ones in town.

    Oak tree
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    Veterans Park

    by Basaic Written Apr 25, 2014

    There is a nice Veterans Park located along Main Street that honors those who have served in the nation's military; especially those who paid the ultimate price. I feel it is important to remember our military and the sacrifices they made protecting our freedoms and our way of life.

    Veterans Park Veterans Memorial Veterans Memorial
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    Shadows on the Teche: Outdoors

    by Basaic Updated Apr 25, 2014

    In addition to, or instead of, touring the inside of the plantation you may want to take a troll through the grounds. They have a nice formal garden which would be quite beautiful when the Camellias and Azaleas are in bloom; a dock on the bayou and a small family cemetery.

    Formal Garden Dock on Bayou Teche Dock on Bayou Teche Cemetery
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    Shadows on the Teche

    by Basaic Written Apr 24, 2014

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    The Shadows on the Teche Plantation house was built 1831 to 1834 for Mr. and Mrs. David Weeks who were rich owners of sugarcane plantations. The home was built using the Greek Revival style of architecture and was in the family until 1958 when the last descendant donated the home to the National Trust for Historic Preservation. The home is also listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Today the home is open as a museum showing how a wealthy plantation family lived during that time period. The home looks much as it did at the time and contains many items belonging to the Weeks Family and their descendants. Tours begin across the street at the visitors center and are run from 9 AM to 5 PM at 15 minutes past the hour. Many parts of the tour are handicapped accessible. Admission is $10 for adults, $8 for seniors and $6.50 for students. There are discounts for military and AAA, and it is cheaper if you just want to walk through the gardens.

    Shadows on the Teche Shadows on the Teche Doesn't This Porch Look Inviting?
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    See the Bayou Teche Museum

    by Basaic Written Apr 24, 2014

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    New Iberia, in some ways, seems to take you a step back into the past. The Bayou Teche Museum shows you that past but in a modern way. The museum has some high-tech interactive displays that educate and entertain visitors of all ages. It is a great way to learn about the history of the area and the New Iberia depicted by local award-winning author James Lee Burke. Hours are 10 AM to 4 PM Thursday through Saturday (or by appointment).

    Bayou Teche Museum
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    New Iberia Library

    by Basaic Written Apr 24, 2014

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    If you cannot make it to the visitor's center or are nearer the library this is an alternative place to stop for info in the area. The first lady I talked to was new to the area and could not help but the second could and did. While here check out the books on the area and use the free Internet to check in on the latest at VT and your e-mail. Photo 2 is of the bell from the old firehouse. The guy in photo 3 was friendly and quite a character!

    Iberia Parish Library Bell From Old Firehouse Friendly Librarian
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    Stop at the Visitor's Center

    by Basaic Written Apr 23, 2014

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    The best place to begin your visit to New Iberia is the Visitor's Center located on Highway 14. Here you can get information on hotels, restaurants, and attractions to help you plan your visit based on your interests and time available. They also have a nice brochure for a walking tour of the historic downtown area, and this is where you arrange for a tour of the Shadows on the Teche Plantation.

    New Iberia Visitor's Center
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    New Iberia and Iberia Parish

    by Basaic Written Apr 23, 2014

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    I like Louisiana, and I like New Iberia. New Iberia is a town of about 31,000 (down 5% since 2000) located along US Highway 90 and a number of Louisiana Highways along the banks of the Bayou Teche in Southern Louisiana. New Iberia was settled in 1779 by immigrants from the Andalusia part of Spain and named for the Iberian Peninsula. The town was incorporated in 1839. New Iberia is the parish seat of Iberia Parish which was established in 1868. The first "courthouse" was just a rented space until a real courthouse was built in 1884. The current courthouse replaced that one and was built in 1940. New Iberia was the residence of famed mystery writer James Lee Burke and his fictional detective Dave Robicheaux. They have made a few movies based on Burke's books like "In the Electric Mist" starring Tommy Lee Jones. Burke does a great job of bringing the area to life.

    Iberia Parish Courthouse Statue in Front of Courthouse
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    Spanish Moss in the Live Oak trees.

    by Madasabull Written Feb 22, 2014

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    When we first saw this stuff hanging from the big trees, I thought it was some sort of moss, lichen, plague, a virus, a parasite killing all the beautiful trees. I think I felt this because I know how destructive vines on some trees can be, and although I new this stuff wasn't a vine, I didn't know what it was, as I had never seen it close up before.

    It was only on my return home and looked it up, that I found out it was a member of the Bromeliad family. Now I had heard of Bromeliads, because I had seen some beautiful flowering Bromeliads with big leafs handing from trees in tropical countries. But I had never seen this stuff that looked like it came straight out of a horror movie.

    It's primary range is between Argentina and the South Eastern US, and it's been introduced to other countries such as Hawaii and Australia.

    It doesn't just grow on the Live Oak, it grows on a lot of other trees too, but it did look great on the great big gnarly Oak trees.

    I was pleased to find it wasn't a destroyer of trees, and feeds from the air and rainfall, but some trees have died due to the some trees not getting enough light on their leafs due to all the moss, and a lot of moss can make it easier for the wind to push the trees over, but this isn't often and these problems wont be the death of a species of tree, so that was great to know.

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    The Evangeline Theater (Sliman Theater)

    by Madasabull Written Feb 22, 2014

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    As we walked along the road, we saw some beautiful old buildings, and some pretty new buildings build to fit in with the old, but The Evangeline Theater was something else.

    I don't know what it is that was about this building that made you want to just look at it, as I am not normally into buildings and architectural sites. Maybe it was the Art Deco look, as that look has always appealed to me, and we weren't alone, there were plenty of others taking pictures and staring too.

    The Evangeline Theater or Sliman Theater for the Performing Arts, was once a wholesale grocers in the late nineteenth century. Then it was a cinema in 1929. the Art Deco was introduced to the building in the 1940's.

    Today it is used as a home to Louisiana Live Performances.

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    A walk along East and West Main Street.

    by Madasabull Written Jan 20, 2014

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    This was one of the nicest street walks we had while on our road trip, it was stunning. East and West Main Street has some of the most stunning old homes, with some amazing Oak tree's with load of hanging Spanish Moss.

    We spent hours just taking in the houses and shops, and there was very little litter, or rubbish of any kind, and running along this street was a river, or swamp with crocs, but we didn't go down there as we were trying to keep our mozzie bites to a minimum.

    If your in these parts, you really have to check out this street.

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    Shadows on the Teche

    by grandmaR Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    We drove towards New Iberia on Louisiana State 182 from Jeanerette, and along the Old Spanish Road with all the big pretty mansions on the bayou side. Eventually we got to Shadows on the Teche and all the signs said to go to the visitor's center across the street first. But there didn't seem to be anything that looked like a visitor's center across the street - it looked like a bank.

    Eventually after going around the block about 3 times (because the street was one way), we turned into the bank parking lot (it was Saturday afternoon so we didn't think we'd get into trouble) and saw the sign on the side of the building that said it was the visitor's center. It was on the side away from the traffic, so you'd have to look back at it to see it.

    We paid our money ($6.25 each for over 62) and took the tour. This was another place that wouldn't let me take pictures inside because of 'security'. Personally if I were going to steal something, I wouldn't need a camera for that - I could use my Mark I eyeball. But at least they told us up front.

    At the visitor's center, I found out that I did not tour Shadows when we were here before because it did not open to the public until 1961. It had been in the original family that built it (David and Mary Weeks in 1834) until the last member (their great grandson William Weeks Hall) died in 1958, one day after signing a contract to give it to the National Trust for Historic Preservation. It has almost all of the original furnishings (unlike Oak Alley) and extensive documentation.

    The Shadows-on-the-Teche is an antebellum historic house museum. It is the only National Trust building in Louisiana.

    Guided tours daily 9 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.

    The preferred way of entry per the last resident The side facing the river Plaque More usual photo of the street side Pond on the grounds
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    Walking Tour

    by grandmaR Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    There is an interesting town walking tour listed on the New Iberia website. This includes:

    # 1-The Episcopal Church of the Epiphany (303 West Main Street) constructed in 1858,and used as a field hospital during the Civil War

    # 2 First United Methodist Church (108 Jefferson Street) erected in 189l in Gothic Revival style.

    # 3 Old Mt. Carmel Academy (109 Bridge Street) built around 1826 as the home of Henry F. Duperier, it later became a girls’ school operated by the Sisters of Mt. Carmel and today is known as Place Eugenie.

    # 4 The Railroad Depot (Railroad Avenue) built as a passenger depot for the Southern Pacific Railroad in 1912.

    # 5 (300 East Main St) The pictured old post office builting, constructed in 1903 and used as a post office until 1965.

    # 6 Shadows on the Teche (317 East Main Street) Built in 1834 by David Weeks, sugarcane planter (3rd photo)

    # 7 The Evangeline Theatre (29 East Main Street) First opened as a movie theatre in 1930 now is known as "The Sliman Theatre for the Performing Arts." (last picture)

    # 8 Statue of Hadrian (Weeks and St. Peters Streets) Hadrian, Roman Emporer 117 A.D. - 138 A. D. was noted as a builder and financier. This one-ton antiquity sculpted from life in 127 A.D. came to New Iberia in 1961 from Rome via London and New Orleans.

    # 9 The Gebert Oak (541 East Main Street) planted in 1834 was large enough for a child to climb in to watch the Yankee troops march into New Iberia during the Civil War.

    # 10 East Main Residental District (East Main Street between Phillip and Center Streets) with 71 buildings that date between c. 1890 and c.1930. (4th photo)

    Walking Tour #5 - Schwing Insurance Building # 2 First United Methodist Church (108 Jefferson) # 6 Shadows on the Teche (317 East Main Street) #10 East Main Residental District from Shadows # 7 The Evangeline Theatre (29 East Main Street)
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  • SKATEBOARDING @ BAYOU WHEELS SKATE PARK

    by JOLIE_DAM Written Sep 25, 2007

    BAYOU WHEELS SKATEBOARD PARK IS LOCATED AT 300 PARKVIEW DRIVE IN BEAUTIFUL NEW IBERIA, LOUISIANA.
    UNDERNEATH TREES WITH PICNIC TABLES SITS A LARGE SKATEBOARD PARK CONSISTING OF THE FOLLOWING:
    8' HALF PIPE
    SEVERAL 1/4 PIPES
    STRAIGHT RAMPS
    PYRAMID
    RAILS
    PIPES

    ADMISSION IS CHEAP TOO!
    $1.00 ADMISSION
    $1.00 HELMET RENTALS
    $1.00 PAD RENTALS (FOR AGES 15 AND UNDER)

    GREAT WAY TO SPEND AFTERNOONS

    SCHOOL HOLIDAYS AND SUMMER TIME HOURS 12 PM TO DUSK
    SCHOOL HOURS 12 PM TO DUSK SATURDAYS AND SUNDAYS

    CLEAN , CLEAN, CLEAN.

    ADULT SUPERVISED DAILY!

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