Art and Statues, New Orleans

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  • Art in the French Quarter
    Art in the French Quarter
    by meteorologist1
  • Art in the French Quarter
    Art in the French Quarter
    by meteorologist1
  • Art in the French Quarter
    Art in the French Quarter
    by meteorologist1
  • VeronicaG's Profile Photo

    Joan of Arc--Welcomes you to the French Market

    by VeronicaG Updated Dec 9, 2008

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    A Gift from France

    Favorite thing: When approaching the French Market near popular Jackson Square, you'll notice this striking statue of Joan of Arc (1412-1431) on her prancing steed. It was a gift from the people of France to the citizens of New Orleans.

    I read that this piece is an exact duplicate of the 1880 Emmanuel Fremiet Equestrian Statue at the Place des Pyramides in Paris. It was given to New Orleans in 1958 by Robert Whyte of World House in New York. The cost of erecting it was going to cost $38,000 so it had to be placed in storage until the funds materialised. Fortuitously, Charles de Gaulle paid a visit to New Orleans and greatly admired the statue.

    He returned to France, interested some of his citizens in the cause and together with the residents of New Orleans raised enough money to place Joan on her 17 foot pedestal for one and all to appreciate! It sits on Decatur street, next to the Cafe du Monde. The piece was gilded in 1985.

    For more info. go to: www.stjoan-center.com/topics/jcraven.html

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    Airbrushing

    by ATXtraveler Written Feb 7, 2005

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    Airbrushed New Orleans Truck.

    Favorite thing: I noticed that alot of people had airbrushed their vehicles when I went down to New Orleans. While I was stuck in rush hour traffic, I had the pleasure of being behind one such vehicle, and felt obliged to share my experience with the world.

    Here is a wonderful view of a New Orleans citizen's airbrushing!

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  • grandmaR's Profile Photo

    Joanie on a Pony

    by grandmaR Updated Jan 11, 2005

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Joan of Arc statue on Decatur St.

    Favorite thing: Dedication of New Orleans' new Place de France

    Remarks by Ambassador François Bujon de l'Estang

    Place de France, New Orleans, LA
    November 14, 1999

    Mr. Mayor,
    Monsignor Morin,
    Distinguished Guests,

    In 1429, a young woman inspired by celestial voices freed the French city of Orleans which was under siege from English troops. Jeanne d'Arc, Joan of Arc, the maid of Orleans.. remains to this day the symbol of resistance to the enemy invader, independence when French soil is attacked, courage in time of adversity when all but hope seems to have vanished...

    Because Jeanne is so important a symbol for French people, I was quite pleased to find in new Orleans the exact original replica of the statue that stands prominently in Orleans, France : it was presented to the City of New Orleans as a gift from the people of France by President Charles de Gaulle, in 1959, during his state visit here.

    The presence of Joan of Arc in this city, the namesake and distant cousin of the city she liberated, underlines our attachment to a common heritage. The particular history of New Orleans and the State of Louisiana is a reminder to us of how long and deep the relationship between our two countries has been. The statue of Bienville, afew hundred yards from here, that we also dedicated jointly a few months ago, also bears witness to this exceptional relationship between New Orleans and France...

    ..Mr. Mayor, in the name of the French authorities, allow me to express to you and to the people of New Orleans our most profound gratitude for returning France and France’s greatest national heroine to the heart of the city, and for giving us this wonderful occasion to celebrate once again the importance of the historical links, as well as the long-standing links of affection, that unite France and the City of New orleans and that unite our two nations.

    Vive la France !

    Vive les Etats-Unis d’Amérique !

    Vive l’Amitié Franco-Américaine !

    Fondest memory: The inscription on the pedestal of St. Joan's statue reads as follows:

    JOAN OF ARC

    MAID OF ORLEANS

    1412 - 1431

    Gift of the People of France

    The tour guide referred to the bronze statue of Joan of Arc as "Joanie on a Pony" The statue is an exact copy of the 1880 Emmanuel Fremiet equestrian statue of Joan located at Place des Pyramides, Paris. It was given to New Orleans by the French in 1958, but the city didn't have the money to put it up, so it was not erected until 1972. It was gilded in 1985. When Harrah's casino was built in 1999, it had to be moved and is now at the corner of St. Philip and Decatur Streets. Many years ago, this place was the site of the fruit complex of the Farmer's Market

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  • grandmaR's Profile Photo

    John Kennedy Toole (1937-1969)

    by grandmaR Written Jun 4, 2005

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Statue of Ignatius J. Reilly

    Favorite thing: A green hunting cap squeezed the top of the fleshy balloon of a head. The green earflaps, full of large ears and uncut hair and the fine bristles that grew in the ears themselves, stuck out on either side like turn signals indicating two directions at once. Full, pursed lips protruded beneath the bushy black moustache and, at their corners, sank into little folds filled with disapproval and potato chip crumbs. In the shadow under the green visor of the cap Ignatius J. Reilly's supercilious blue and yellow eyes looked down upon the other people waiting under the clock at the D.H. Holmes department store, studying the crowd of people for signs of bad taste in dress. Several of the outfits, Ignatius noticed, were new enough and expensive enough to be properly considered offenses against taste and decency. Possession of anything new or expensive only reflected a person's lack of theology and geometry; it could even cast doubts upon one's soul.

    --from A Confederacy of Dunces

    Fondest memory: I took this picture on the way to get a three day trolley pass at the the check cashing place on the other side of Canal Street. I did not know who it depicted, and it took me some time to track it down.

    Apparently John Kennedy Toole (who was born the same year as I was) wrote this book called "A Confederacy of Dunces". It is famous (although obviously not to me) for the recording of the type of dialogue spoken in New Orleans - some think that it is the most accurate depiction of the city in a work of fiction. However; some New Orleanians think it portrays the city and its inhabitants in an unfavorable light.

    The nearly life-sized statue stands in front of the hotel Chateau Sonesta, the former D. H. Holmes Department Store. The bronze statue shows Ignatius J. Reilly standing "under the clock".

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  • VeronicaG's Profile Photo

    Statues & Memorials Along the Muddy Miss

    by VeronicaG Updated Dec 22, 2008

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Memorial to Malcolm Woldenberg
    2 more images

    Favorite thing: Woldenberg Riverfront Park, a lovely park edging the mighty Missisippi River, honors New Orleans benefactor, Malcolm Woldenberg, who was a leader, philanthropist and local businessman in the city (1896-1962).

    You'll also find the Moonwalk, a walkway dedicated to former New Orleans mayor, Maurice "Moon" Landrieu.

    Throughout the park at #1 Canal Street, you'll glimpse statues, memorials and monuments to various causes or events--here are a few:

    pic #1: This bronze statue portrays a warm family scene with Mr. Woldenberg and his grandnephew, sculpted by artist, William Ludwig in 1990.

    pic #2 The Monument to the Immigrant--sculpted from white Carrara marble, is the work of Franco Allesandrini. It shows 'Miss Liberty facing the Mississippi and an immigrant family facing the French Quarter', where they first resided

    pic #3 The New Orleans Holocaust Memorial-resembling a spiral walkway and hewn of Jerusalem Stone highlights nine sculptured panels at its center created by Jewish artist, Yaacov Agam. It is in memory of the six million Jews of Europe and millions of other Nazi victims who were killed

    The brick walkway carries the visitor to other pieces of art placed around this fourteen acre park. We found it to be a peaceful place in which to take a moment or two to rest, to watch the ships plying the river and most interesting of all....to people watch.

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  • cmarsek's Profile Photo

    In honor of Jackson

    by cmarsek Updated Dec 3, 2005
    He was victorious!

    Favorite thing: There are few cities in the United States that have as much to see on a leisurely strolls through the streets. In the battle against the British, General Andrew Jackson defeated the British at New Orleans. Today there is a large statue of Andrew Jackson on a horse that is reared up on its hind legs in the victorious position.

    Fondest memory: I loved the sights and scenes on the streets on New Orleans!

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    Saint Anthony's garden

    by Jonathan_C Updated Oct 15, 2004

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    outstretched arms

    Favorite thing: Immediately behind Saint Louis Cathedral is Saint Anthony's garden. Nestled between Pirate Alley and Pierre Antoine Alley, this little garden is a tranquil island in a sea of activity.

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  • Virtuous_Tourist's Profile Photo

    at the New Orleans Museum of Art.

    by Virtuous_Tourist Written Dec 7, 2003

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: This is one of my favorite paintings at NOMA (New Orleans Museum of Art).
    It's Monet's "Snow at Giverny", 1893.

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  • Beachdave's Profile Photo

    Here is a bronze statue of a...

    by Beachdave Written Aug 25, 2002

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    Favorite thing: Here is a bronze statue of a girl resting on the fountain. We did not have to tip here to take her pictures.

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  • meteorologist1's Profile Photo

    Colorful Art on the Streets

    by meteorologist1 Written Mar 30, 2013
    Art in the French Quarter
    2 more images

    Favorite thing: You will see lots of very colorful art on the streets in the French Quarter. Definitely worth checking out!

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  • Virtuous_Tourist's Profile Photo

    Warhol / Stones

    by Virtuous_Tourist Written May 30, 2004

    Favorite thing: This "montage" of early Rolling Stones newspaper clippings by Andy Warhol was on display at the New Orleans Museum of Art.

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    • Music

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