Cuisine, New Orleans

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  • Delicious Beignets
    Delicious Beignets
    by ATXtraveler
  • Many Hands : Lots of Customers
    Many Hands : Lots of Customers
    by hquittner
  • Technic!
    Technic!
    by hquittner
  • ATXtraveler's Profile Photo

    Beignets

    by ATXtraveler Written Nov 24, 2008

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Delicious Beignets

    Favorite thing: One of the most addictive substances available to you in New Orleans (legally anyway), is the Beignet (pronounced been-yea). These wonderful fried pieces of dough, topped with powdered sugar can be eaten one at a time, or plateful after plateful. The most famous place to pick one of these wonderful treats is in the French Quarter at Cafe du Monde, but don't feel as if you have to only try one here. There are plenty of places around the city to pick them up!

    One thing you will likely want to have is a cafe au lait (coffee with milk), and for a unique taste, try the coffee with chickory.

    Remember, beignet consumption in moderation.

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    Etouffee

    by maestrousmc Written May 10, 2008

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Crawfish Etouffee

    Favorite thing: Definition: A standard in any New Orleans kitchen - home or commercial. A spicy and delicious Cajun stew traditionally made with crawfish, vegetables and a dark roux though sometimes the crawfish is substituted with shrimp or (yikes) chicken. Warning: some may consider this blasphemous. Étouffée is usually served over rice. The word comes from the French étouffer, which means to smother.

    Pronunciation: ay-too-FAY

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    How to Eat A Po-Boy

    by hquittner Written May 3, 2007

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Technic!

    Favorite thing: Preamble: This is not a delicate eating experience. First find a space at a table or counter with elbow room. Then have at hand a dispenser of small paper napkins and a drink of choice: beer, wine or a soft drink. Remove 6 napkins.(One should probably be given a bib, but this is not a Maine lobster, only a sandwich). It is helpful if you have sharp incisor teeth not worn old ones like mine or capped ones). Open the paper wrapper and center it or the paper plate close to you. The loaf should be ordered to be cut in 2 or 3 pieces. when ordering. Ready.

    The Eating: Take the loaf section firmly in both hands with a cut edge up (not the heel) , compress it slightly , noting the discharge of juices onto the paper not your shirt, lean over the table and bite firmly into the loaf about 1/2 inch from the edge. Hopefully the juices and meat are not too hot! Stop; continue your bite until you have severed a off a piece so you can chew the softening bread and ingredients. Put the loaf down and take one or more napkins to wipe your soiled face and fingers, while savoring the melange of tastes: the sweet of the meat, the silkiness of the dressing, the tart of the dill pickle, the hot pepper! Think of the meat . Should you have ordered a different one? (Next time). If your shirt is stained , never mind, this is par for the course (it will clean up with “shout it out”). Continue as above, it is easier now as it cools. The second portion (the victory lap) proceeds until you are satisfied. When the eating is done compress the pile of napkins and locate the disposal container.

    Fondest memory: Eating

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    The Secret of the Perfect Po-boy

    by hquittner Written May 3, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Po-Boy Interiors,Side Materials(No Napkins!)
    1 more image

    Favorite thing: What makes the best Po-boys is the “French Bread”. This is a New Orleans baguette , of a somewhat different texture. It should be extremely fresh (although buttering and oven treatment helps revive 6 hour old bread). The best Po-boy shops use only Leidenheimer’s brand. Our favorite place(Domilise-See Restaurant Tip) , receives truck delivery twice a day! The bite, slight crumble and absorptive capacity of the dough are critical. According to experts only verry fresh L’s bread fulfills the requirements. This is why it has been hard to duplicate a GOOD N.O. po-boy elsewhere.
    The original po-boys have been altered by all purveyors due to public demands and inhibited American tastes. The standards: “roast beef and debris”or fried oysters are still the essential, but in N.O., the demand for shrimp for the more timid palate must be met. The dressing is an essential part of the preparation and the type of mayonnaise (usually a cheap commercial one) and “red-sauce”(blend of cayenne sauce and ketchup) is a “chef’s secret”. There are also a few eclectic offerings. Mother’s adds baked ham. Our favorites are at Crabby Jacks (See Restaurant Tip). Here the featured fillings are paneed rabbit, slow-roasted duck in a rich gravy, cochon au lait (juicy pork) and barbecued beef brisket ( with sauce). Both of our Po-boy sources have weathered the hurricane and are as busy as ever.

    Fondest memory: Eating

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    Our History of the Po-boy

    by hquittner Written May 3, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Putting Out the Fresh Fried Food

    Favorite thing: The po-boy had its physical origin in the Oyster Loaf which appeared about 1900. The loaf consists of a one foot segment of a “French Bread” slice in half horizontally, smothered with butter, heated in the oven f at 300F for 6 minutes. When removed a dozen hot lightly deep-fried oysters (dipped in a spiced cornmeal batter) is placed on one half. This is slathered with mayonnaise and dribbled with a hot sauce (a little milder than pure Tabasco). It became the custom to “dress” this further with shredded lettuce, tomato slices and dill pickle slices. This tidbit in pieces was offered free at bars as a sustainer to encourage drinking or as they say “pour boire”. The name is ascribed to a the time of a street car strike (in 1929?). Two ex-conductors ran a sandwich shop near the end of the line on Canal Street where the “starving” strikers congregated and they were reported to have been sustained by baguette sandwiches filled with cheap beef and gravy provided by these sympathetic restauranteurs. (It was during Prohibition and the old pour-boire was not functional). But the name readily corrupted to something for the “Poor Boys” on the strike line. So the French Loaf remained as the Po-boy. When I was a student in the late 30’s , my first exposure to the sandwich was at a bar at the corner of Canal Street where the St. Charles streetcar entered it. Here they featured a (free) Po-boy sandwich with a drink for 25 cents. (Actually it was not “free” because the drinks were about 10-15 cents). We were under age and had root beer from the tap. A century has passed since the beginning and the Po-boy is stronger than ever. Whether it provided inspiration for the Philly Steak or the Submarine is for others to decide. If you read about what makes it unique(in other Tips) you will understand the difference to a gourmand.

    Fondest memory: Living here an being able to eat.

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  • What to eat

    by mardigras Written Jan 30, 2005

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: • Bananas Fosters (cooked bananas over vanilla ice cream) at Brennan’s.
    • Beignets (deep-fried squares of dough topped with powdered sugar) at Café du Monde (across from Jackson Square, 525-4544, open 24 hours, except on Christmas Day).
    • Muffuletta (cold cut, cheese, and secret olive salad sandwich on round loaf of Italian bread; half should satisfy one person’s appetite) at Central Grocery (523-1620; 923 Decatur St; 8am-5:30pm daily). Also at the Napo-leon House where they warm it up.
    • Oysters at Casamento’s or at the Acme Oysters House (522-5973; 724 Iberville St.; 11am-10pm and 11pm on weekends) or at Felix’s across the street if the line is too long. Also at Deanie’s.
    • Boiled Crawfish at Deanie’s, Acme Oyster House, or Sid Mar.
    • Shrimp Remoulade at Arnaud’s.
    • Oyster Rockefeller at Antoine’s.
    • Whatever your waiter recommends at Galatoire’s.
    • Blackened Redfish at K-Paul’s.
    • Po’ Boys (sandwich on French bread with fried shrimp, fried oysters, roast beef, etc… “dressed” typically with lettuce, tomato, mayo, hot sauce): at Domilise’s or Franky & Johnny’s uptown. Also downtown at Uglesich’s, Johnny’s Po’Boys and the Verti Mart.
    • Roast Beef Po’ Boy at Parasol’s.
    • Gumbo at the Gumbo Shop or at Coop’s.
    • Turtle Soup at Commander’s Palace.
    • Barbecued Shrimp at Pascal’s Manale.
    • Chocolate Pecan Pie at Camellia Grill.
    • Burgers at Port of Call, the Clover Grill, or Camillia Grill.
    • Pralines at Southern Candy Makers or Laura’s.
    • King Cake during the Mardi Gras season from Gambino’s.
    • Bam! Call way ahead of time if you want to eat anything at any of Emeril Lagasse’s three restaurants: Emeril’s, NOLA, and Emeril

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    Bananas Foster

    by Jonathan_C Updated Oct 9, 2004

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    bananas foster

    Favorite thing: New Orleans is famous for its chefs and their desire to make their mark with something new. If you're eating in Brennan's or Arnaud's or the Twin Sisters or anywhere else fancy enough to offer Bananas Foster you should definitely order it. Not only is it delicious, but the performance of making it alone is worth the price of a ticket.

    Here's a little history copied from a country radio station web site's 100 best New Orleans restaurant dishes:

    "The dessert was created because the Brennans were very intimate with the family that ran United Fruit Company, the world's largest banana shippers. It was the recipe of Chef Paul Blange, who inspired most of Brennan's early cooking, and is named after the people who owned the Foster Awning Company."

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    New Orleans school of cooking

    by L-A Written Aug 11, 2004
    L-A's red beans and rice

    Favorite thing: The food! You can take the cooking school and learn from Big Kevin Belton. I learned how to make cornbread, red beans and rice, pecan pralines (New Orleans version) and pecan pie. Mmmm!

    Fondest memory: Its a toss up - music in French Quarter and the food. First time I was there I went as an artist. The second time it was for the music but took the cooking school. My husband and I stayed in a timeshare so I could try out cooking Louisiana style.

    I also took a bus trip to my favourite clothes store in Kenner, and this lady on the bus complained the whole time about some bad food "all rice, no bean" over and over. It was funny but I felt sorry for her.

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    Restaurants Galore!!!!

    by Jmill42 Updated Jul 5, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Mediterranean Vegrice

    Favorite thing: One of the best attributes of this city is the food. New Orleans is renowned for its mix of all cuisine's, but also for mixing in the south's Cajun influences. What is produced is some of the best food you can find. Some of the restaurants are very elegant, aesthetically pleasing establishments, but as I have found some of the best places to eat GREAT, not good, food is in very “hole-in-the-wallish” type places. You don’t have to spend a fortune at Emeril’s (although you definitely should if you can; see my Restaurants heading) to have awesome food. As far as restaurants that I have visited, I will try to list as many different types as I can. By no means is this an exhautive list! On your trip here, do yourself a favor and get away from the Quarter and find yourself one of these "off the path" restaurants. You might come out having eaten the best meal of your life!

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    You absolutely must try to see...

    by jypsylade Updated Jun 15, 2003

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    Favorite thing: You absolutely must try to see and experience everything that New Orleans has to offer. THE FOOD,,THE FOOD,, THE FOOD!!..I couldn't get enough of it!! Everything was so different and delicious!! While on Burbon Street you have to find Pat O'Brian's, where they make the world famous hurricane, at least that's what I remember them calling it, you only need about 2 and your well on your way. The people are amazing, the music is awsome!! Louisiana warmed my soul...i will for sure visit it again!

    Fondest memory: The Daiquiri shops!! They are on every street corner like ice cream stands, they are very delicious and you should try to avoid as many of them as possible, if your not careful you'll find yourself in trouble. Like myself in this picutre, i stumbled apon one too many that night!!

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    Say what???

    by spartan Updated May 30, 2003

    0.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: Try a beignet (pronounced ben yeah). A beignet is a rectangle of donut dough, about 3 1/2' x 3, they're made by rolling out the dough, then cutting them into shape with a donut-cutter fashioned like a rolling pin that has the metal frame of the shapes wrapped around it.

    These dough rectangles are then deep fried until they puff up. They're scooped out of the oil, drained, then placed on saucers, three per dish. They are then covered with powdered confectioner's sugar and served. They taste very good with a cafe au lait.

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    hurricane's and red beans & rice

    by excitableone Written Feb 25, 2003

    Favorite thing: alright it seems silly that a simple little pastry could dominate a trip, but until you've been to cafe du monde and had an order of Beignets oh lord you don't know what your missing.. they have 2 cafe du monde's that we found the best one is in the french quarter it's the main cafe,the other is located in the river walk.

    Fondest memory: BOURBON ST..... RED BEANS & RICE....

    this town has a smell that i can't quite explain, or anyone can for that matter but it makes it what it is NEW ORLEANS.. the smell of the streets being cleaned in the morning,the fresh seafood, the alcohol,etc.... this town captured part of my soul, and i will be back many times to experiance the jazz the food everything great about new orleans!!!!

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    Pick restaurants carefully. ...

    by llama765 Written Aug 26, 2002

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: Pick restaurants carefully. Lots of hype does not mean great food. For instance: Antoine's Restaurant has always been associated with New Orleans, but in deciding whether to go there, we walked by at prime time on a Saturday night and there were only 4 customers in the restaurant. I can guess what that means.

    Fondest memory: Had a great walk on river walk along the mighty Mississippi. Started out early in the morning and finished at Jackson Square for Cafe au Lait and Beinget's (spelling ?). The Cafe au Lait is wonderfull, but the beignets were greasy, doughy and got powerdered sugar all over my black pants. Proceed with caution on the dough balls.

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    Also on the third floor are...

    by Beachdave Written Aug 25, 2002

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    Favorite thing: Also on the third floor are the fudge candymakers. This fudge will melt in your mouth. While they are finishing with fudge theu swirl it in the air, joke with crown and sing. It is enjoyable. The guy who seemed to be the leader said if you bought a large amount of candy you could have one of the candy makers go home with you free of charge. Did not take him up on it. I will add more to this page when I get more pictures developed. I really enjoyed New

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    EAT! I tended to eat at small...

    by Joyce_Lee Written Aug 25, 2002

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    Favorite thing: EAT! I tended to eat at small establishments for a more intimate down home feeling. To party there are all kinds of places along Bourbon Street. My favorites included Patrick O'Brien's (very busy place with dueling pianos), Lafitte's Blacksmith Shop (very old establishment which was a front for the pirate) and, of course, the Preservation Jazz Club.

    Fondest memory: Hanging out with some people I met there and meeting the locals, one of which invited us over to his house to listen to Miles Davis. Left there early in the morning and the fog filled the streets and gave a glow to the old streetlights. Very ethereal.

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