Unique Places in New Orleans

  • Off The Beaten Path
    by Paul2001
  • The Confederate Memorial Museum
    The Confederate Memorial Museum
    by Paul2001
  • Momuments/Statues
    by Ewingjr98

Most Viewed Off The Beaten Path in New Orleans

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    The Confederate Memorial Museum

    by Paul2001 Written Jan 28, 2014

    The Confederate Memorial Museum is a small museum dedicated to the war effort by those men who fought for the Confederacy during the American Civil War. The museum is small but fill with an amazing collection of Civil War memorabilia and weaponry. Noteworthy is the scant mention of why they were fighting on this side of the Civil War, slavery although this was not the sole reason for men like General Robert E. Lee. Included amongst the collection are 125 battle flags, cannons, sabers, the belongs of Lee, Louisiana general P. G. T. Beauregard and Jefferson Davis. I found that the staff here was very helpful and really proud of their museum. The gift shop has quite a few good books on the Civil War and lots of replica hats you can buy. Please note that I was given permission for the taking the picture above by the staff. Otherwise photos of the collection are not permitted.
    The museum is located next to the also very interesting Ogden Museum of Southern Art at 929 Camp St. One should note that this is a very rare museum in that it closes on Sunday AND Monday.

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    lower ninth ward

    by doug48 Updated May 16, 2012

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    the lower ninth ward is an area of new orleans that was devastated by hurricane katrina in 2005. this low income neighborhood was flooded by a levee break during the storm and partially destroyed almost all of the homes in the area. five years later little has been done to repair this neighboorhood and only a couple of streets have new homes. a disturbling but historically significant area to see in new orleans. from downtown take n. claiborne ave. east about three miles to the lower ninth ward. to see more images of this devastated area see my lower 9 th ward travelogue.

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    New Orleans Pharmacy Museum

    by Ewingjr98 Updated Oct 17, 2011

    The Pharmacy Museum, billed as America’s first licensed pharmacy, sits only a few blocks from America's first licensed brothel. Apparently New Orleans had lots of government bureaucracy, probably better to collect taxes... and bribes.

    The pharmacy was established in the early 1823 by Louis Joseph Dufilho, Jr. The museum features hand-carved rosewood cabinets from 1860, hand blown apothecary bottles, and Civil War surgical instruments such as bone saws. Remedies from the day included cocaine, alcohol, and opium, as well as love potions and other cures. In the back of the shop is a courtyard with herbal remedies growing.

    The building was initially used as a local house, but within a year of construction, Dufilho purchased it and opened his pharmacy. The pharmacy was in operation until 1855, and it was later used as a house, a paper warehouse, and even as the city's Napoleon Museum, until the city realized it had designated the wrong property as the home that offered Napoleon refuge during his exile. The apothecary museum opened in 1950.

    Admission Cost: $5 for adults, $4 for senior citizens and students. Children under age 5 are admitted free of charge.

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    Cornstalk Fence on Royal Street

    by Jefie Updated Aug 6, 2011

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    There are three cornstalk fences left in New Orleans, two of which I got to see. The most famous one can be seen at the Cornstalk Hotel, located at 915 Royal Street in the French Quarter. This cast iron gate was installed in 1856 and it's especially popular because of how all the details are highlighted in colours. The story goes that the fence was added for a young bride who had been forced to leave her native Iowa and move with her husband to Louisiana. The groom hoped that seeing the cornstalks would remind her of the cornfields from back home and make her feel less lonely :o)

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    Literary sites in New Orleans

    by Jefie Updated Aug 6, 2011

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    For some people with a literary mind, it's pratically impossible to see a streetcar go by on Canal Street without thinking of Blanche DuBois and Stanley Kowalski. Tennessee Williams wrote his famous play "A Streetcar Named Desire" during the time he resided in the French Quarter, at 632 St. Peter Street. The appartment he lived in is still a private home, but there's a plaque on the building indicating that the playwright lived there in 1946-47. Incidentally, many of Williams's plays have been performed throughout the years just a few steps down the street at the "Petit Theatre du Vieux Carre". Located at 616 St. Peter Street, this small community theatre first opened in 1922 and although it's currently experiencing some financial difficulties, a team of volunteers and businessmen are looking at ways to preserve this historically and socially important building. Finally, there's another place with a literary connection just around the corner, on Pirate's Alley. Famous American author William Faulkner lived at 624 Pirate's Alley when he wrote his very first novel, "Soldier's Pay", in 1925. It is now home to "Faulkner House Books", a very charming bookstore that mainly focuses on local writers and southern literature. It's not very big, but it's definitely worth taking a quick peak inside even if you don't plan on buying anything because the character of the house has been very well preserved.

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    The Spotted Cat

    by kokoryko Written Jul 22, 2011

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    Along your random strolls, at the confines of the French Quarter and Marigny, you may step on this little place from where music pours out of the inviting open door. The day I found this place, it was rather quiet inside, a few customers, but a very nice band; they played Cajun style music and Yvonne, the singer (picture 1) had an impressive “presence” on the stage!
    It is the sort of place I like, beer, a bit food, good music and nice customers and the Cindy,the keeper, (picture 2) was very kind with the “lost” foreigner here. This is a sort of place where you can feel the atmosphere of a city (or at least have the illusion to feel that atmosphere!), and at least, music here is a driving force, even with small bands (picture 3).

    This place is not on Bourbon Street, not exactly a tourist spot, just a small wooden house (I would say shelter) where people loving music love to meet, have a drink and listen to music they love. . . . . (picture 4). And when the young generation passes by, they are curious to know what happens inside and already begin to “feel” the music (picture 5)


    623 Frenchmen St., New Orleans

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    chalmette battlefield

    by doug48 Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    chalmette battlefield is the site of the battle of new orleans in the war of 1812. the battle of new orleans was the final battle in the war of 1812. on this site british commander sir alexander cochrane tried to invade and capture the city of new orleans. cochrane's forces were defeated by the american forces of general andrew jackson. this important victory made jackson nationally famous and later led to his election as president of the united states. for those interested in american history the chalmette battlefield site is a important place to visit in the new orleans area. the battlefield is located at 8606 west st. bernard hwy in st. bernard parish. from downtown new orleans take st. claude ave. (SR 46) five miles southeast of the french quarter.

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    Colette

    by Hexepatty Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Free your mind, the rest will follow.

    Keep things simple:
    Rule #1: No means No..
    Rule #2: You are permitted to watch.

    There are more rules, but I just stuck to rule 1 and rule 2 and I was cool with that.

    Caution: Very discreet entrance. Trust the street address. Take a cab there and have desk call you one when you depart.

    No Alcohol served, but it is BYOB. We brought a bottle of wine.

    We went there on a Sunday evening. Since I was a "Lifestyle Virgin", maybe the gods were looking out for me: We had planned to go on Saturday night which in retrospect, might have been sensory overload! But on Saturday morning I woke up w/ an eye infection and by nightfall I was at a local hospital's E.R. instead of Colettes until 1AM!

    So Sunday it had to be... and it was "slow"... not a lot of folks. But enough for me to imagine what happened on Saturday night. And there were still some folks there, few that there were... I got to see a little sumthin, sumthin...

    Colette
    822 Gravier Street
    New Orleans, LA 70112

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    Day trip to Gulfport, MS and Biloxi

    by yankeepeddler Written Nov 26, 2010

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    Coming from New England, I usually don't associate the Deep South with beautiful beaches. Take a short day trip to Gulfport and Biloxi and you soon will. Its a short 90 minute ride from downtown New Orleans, straight out I-10. Take the first Gulfport exit and head south until you hit the beach road - Route 90 (?).

    The first thing you notice is the pearl white sand. There are plenty of parking spaces all along the beach road. Go on the beach and feel the sand .... it has the consistency of sugar. It's reminiscent of the beaches in Clear Water, FLA only much, much bigger. Evidence of Katrina is obvious - empty lots everywhere - all the rubble long since gone - brand new homes going up. We stopped in a some restaurant just before you hit the Biloxi line (it was blue and right on the beach). Prices were extremely reasonable - especially compared to French Quarter. Food was excellent. Staff gave us some great travel tips and were happy to answer our questions about Katrina.

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    carrollton historic district

    by doug48 Updated Jun 14, 2009

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    the carrollton historic district is missed by many visitors to new orleans. it is located at a bend of the mississippi river just west of the garden district. carrollton was established by charles zimpel on the site of the macarthy plantation in 1833. pictured is the old jefferson parish courthouse. carrollton was the seat of jefferson parish from 1857 to 1874. of interest to the tourist is it's historic buildings and a nice collection of restaurants and bars. one way to get to carrollton is to take the st. charles streetcar. from downtown you can also drive down st. charles ave. through the garden district to carrollton.

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    river road

    by doug48 Updated Jun 4, 2009

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    the "river road" area between new orleans and baton rouge has an excellent collection of pre-civil war plantations. the "river road" is actually several roads that run along the mississippi river. many of the plantations are located on SR 1 and SR 18 near the town of vacherie. pictured is nottoway plantation.

    from downtown new orleans take I-10 west and exit to US 61 north near the mississippi river.

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    st. joseph plantation

    by doug48 Updated May 25, 2009

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    st. joseph plantation was built in 1830 on 2,300 acres. st. joseph is an excellent example of a pre-civil war sugarcane plantation. st. joseph has a raised creole plantation house, several slave cabins, and a school house on the grounds. st. joseph plantation is listed on the national register of historic places.

    st. joseph plantation is located at 3535 SR 18 near the town of vacherie.

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    laura plantation

    by doug48 Updated May 24, 2009

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    the laura plantation house is a raised creole house built in 1820. the laura plantation has a rare collection of out buildings with some dating back to the 1750's. the laura plantation is one of the best examples of a pre-civil war creole plantation on the "river road". laura plantation is listed on the national register of historic places.

    laura plantation is located on SR 18 near the town of vacherie.

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    tezcuco plantation

    by doug48 Written May 24, 2009

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    tezcuco plantation was once a raised creole cottage with greek revival additions. texcuco was built by benjamin tureaund in 1855. sadly this beautiful home was destroyed by fire in 2002. the ruins and original out buildings are still worth a look when traveling on SR 44.

    the address is 3138 SR 44 near the town of darrow.

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    evergreen plantation

    by doug48 Written May 23, 2009

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    this greek revival plantation house was built by pierre becnel in 1832. in 1860 just before the start of the civil war the plantation was owned by lenzin becnel and had 103 slaves. evergreen plantation is listed on the national register of historic places. evergreen is open to the public by appointment.

    evergreen plantation is located on SR 18 near the town of wallace.

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