Momuments/Statues, New Orleans

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  • Momuments/Statues
    by Ewingjr98
  • Momuments/Statues
    by Ewingjr98
  • The Streetcar goes around Lee Circle
    The Streetcar goes around Lee Circle
    by Ewingjr98
  • maestrousmc's Profile Photo

    A focal point central to all

    by maestrousmc Written May 13, 2008

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Lee Circle

    Since it was built in 1884, the most prominent monument in New Orleans has been a 60-foot (18 m)-tall monument to General Lee. A sixteen and a half foot statue of Lee stands tall upon a towering column of white marble in the middle of Lee Circle. The statue of Lee, which weighs more than 7,000 pounds, faces the South. Lee Circle is situated along New Orleans' famous St. Charles Avenue. The New Orleans streetcars roll past Lee Circle and New Orleans' best Mardi Gras parades go around Lee Circle (the spot is so popular that bleachers are set up annually around the perimeter for Mardi Gras). Around the corner from Lee Circle is New Orleans' Confederate Museum, which contains the second largest collection of Confederate memorabilia in the world.

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  • Jmill42's Profile Photo

    The Scattered Monuments of New Orleans

    by Jmill42 Updated May 18, 2003

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    Bienville

    Being only a couple of hundred years old, New Orleans has gone through quite a few leadership changes. Being at a prime position on the Mississippi River made it a very valuable commodity. What this had led to present day, are hundreds of monuments and plaques scattered all over town immortalizing the acts of various important people. One of the most important is Bienville, who basically founded New Orleans. It can be found across from the Jackson Brewery on Decatur St.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Hiking and Walking

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  • Jmill42's Profile Photo

    The Most Important Man in NOLA's History

    by Jmill42 Updated May 18, 2003

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Being that a city cannot be important until it BECOMES a city, I wouold think the most important guy in NOLA's history would be Bienville. As you can read on his plaque, he is the "father" of New Orleans, arriving in 1717.

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    Poydras Side of the Superdome

    by grandmaR Updated Aug 5, 2005

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    Vietnam Veterans's Memorial framed by flags

    This bronze statue on the Poydras Street side is the Vietnam Veterans Memorial. It reminded me of the Iwo Jima Memorial in Washington D.C., but I could find no referances to it on the internet until Dorcas (Little_Lou_Lou) pointed me in the right direction. This is not the only sculpture/sculpture group on Poydras.

    Across from the Superdome on Poydras Street is a large abstract sculpture which was on the other side of the bus, so I didn't get a picture of it. The sculptor, Ida Kohlmeyer, meant to evoke the frivolity and zany spirit of Mardi Gras.

    Walking up Poydras toward St. Charles (which should only be done during the day) you come to the Bloch Cancer Survivors Monument, a block-long walkway of whimsical columns, figures, and a triumphal arch in the median of Loyola Avenue at its intersection with Poydras Street.

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  • grandmaR's Profile Photo

    Bernardo Galvez Statue

    by grandmaR Updated Apr 4, 2011

    2 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Galvez statue

    This is a statue to Bernardo de Galvez who was the Governor of Louisiana from 1777 to 1785 (during the Revolution)

    The plaque on it says

    The government of
    Spain donates this
    statue to the city of
    New Orleans to
    commemorate the
    bicentennial year of
    the Independence of the
    United States to which
    the Spanish Government
    so decisively
    contributed.


    There's statue to him in Washington D.C. which says

    Bernardo De Calvez, the great Spanish soldier, carried out a courageous campaign in Lands bordering the lower Mississippi. This masterpiece of military strategy lightened the pressure of the English in the war against American settlers who were fighting for their independence.

    May this statue of Bernardo de Calvez serve as a reminder that Spain offered the blood of her soldiers for the cause of American independence

    He died in Mexico at the age of 38. Galveston TX was named for him.

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    • Arts and Culture
    • Women's Travel

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  • Ewingjr98's Profile Photo

    Battle of Liberty Place Monument

    by Ewingjr98 Updated Oct 18, 2011
    1 more image

    Hidden on a small side street, near the Audubon Aquarium and One Canal Place is a hidden monument in the form of an obelisk. The area is often a resting spot for homeless but few others. What is this impressive but secluded monument so close to the tourist areas, but so far off the beaten path?

    This is called the Battle of Liberty Place Monument, named for a skirmish in on 14 September 1874. There was a war in 1874? Yes... sort of. This post-Civil War battle was fought between the Crescent City White League and the New Orleans Metropolitan Police. These are not armies I've heard of.... No you probably haven't heard of these armies in this battle. The Battle of Liberty Place was a battle between white Democrats, many of whom were Confederate War veterans, and the reconstruction-era Republicans who were made up of many northerners and blacks.

    The conflict was fought over the disputed gubernatorial election of 1872, in which a Republican claimed victory. The white democrats refused to accept this result and they formed the White League to replace the governor with a Democrat. On 14 September 1874 about 5,000 well-armed White League men squared off against 3,500 police and state militia. The police and militia were soundly defeated, with about 100 dead on both sides, and the Democrat took over as governor, but only until the Federal government sent in troops to restore the elected government.

    In 1891, Battle of Liberty Place monument was erected by a newly elected Democrat-controlled state government, which was also opposed to blacks rights. The monument was erected to "commemorate the uprising" and was placed in the median on Canal Street in downtown New Orleans. In the 1970s, the inscriptions on the plaque were modified to show a more neutral stance on the event, and in 1989, the monument was finally removed during work on Canal Street. After much debate over the appropriateness of the monument, it was eventually placed in a less visible location, where it remains today, still occasionally evoking controversy.

    Of note, the monument inscriptions indicate that the monument now stands "in honor of those Americans on both sides who died in the Battle of Liberty Place," from the White League, police, and military. Another inscription sagely notes that the Battle of Liberty Place was "A conflict of the past that should teach us lessons for the future."

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    Robert E. Lee Monument

    by Ewingjr98 Updated Oct 22, 2011
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    The Robert E. Lee Monument was constructed in 1884, and it was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1991. It is located in Lee Circle, on the edge of the Central Business District near the Garden District. The monument consists of a 60 foot doric column topped by a 12 foot tall statue of the great Confederate General.

    General Robert E. Lee was the most heralded general for the south in the American Civil War, and many men from Louisiana served under his command in Northern Virginia. It is interesting to note, however, that New Orleans was conquered by the north before Lee ever took over the Army of Northern Virginia. Lee's Monument stands in a city that was never part of the Confederacy while he was a general. Admiral David Farragut captured New Orleans on April 25, 1862, while General Lee took command of the Army of Northern Virginia on June 1, 1862.

    To get to Lee Circle, take the St. Charles Line Street Car. There's a stop right next to the circle.

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    Hurricane Katrina Memorials

    by Ewingjr98 Updated Oct 21, 2011
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    As we all remember well, Hurricane Katrina devastated New Orleans in 2005. When the hurricane hit near the city on 29 August 2011, numerous levees failed, resulting in flooding of 80 percent of the city and the deaths of at least 1,836 people. The damage also devastated coastal areas of nearby Mississippi.

    New Orleans has many memorials, large and small, to remind visitors and residents of this tragic event. One of my favorites is called Scrap House, designed by artist Sally Heller. This art work, depicting a damaged house suspended in a tree, is made of scrap collected after the hurricane.

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  • mangoblue99's Profile Photo

    THE CITY HAS LOCAL ARTIST...

    by mangoblue99 Written Aug 24, 2002

    1 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    THE CITY HAS LOCAL ARTIST THAT YOU CAN SEE THERE WORK EVERYWERE...THIS WAS BEHIND THE CAFE DUMONTE....

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