Canal Street and CBD, New Orleans

10 Reviews

Canal Street, New Orleans

Been here? Rate It!

hide
  • canal street
    canal street
    by doug48
  • Streetcar tracks from the Street Car
    Streetcar tracks from the Street Car
    by grandmaR
  • Picture taken from the Canal Street line
    Picture taken from the Canal Street line
    by grandmaR
  • Ewingjr98's Profile Photo

    Central Business District

    by Ewingjr98 Updated Apr 4, 2011

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    4 more images

    Between the French Quarter and the Garden District is the Central Business District, probably the second most famous area of New Orleans. Traditionally called the American Quarter, this was the part of the city settled after the Louisiana Purchase. Canal Street is the division between the French Quarter and the CBD, and is a popular area for shopping, along with its many upscale hotels and Harrah's Casino. Also in the CBD are the Superdome, the old and new City Halls, the D-Day Museum and the Confederate War Museum, and Lafayette Square. Near the river in the CBD is the Warehouse District, formerly a location for storing goods for shipment, now one of the city's best nightlife areas.

    Related to:
    • Road Trip

    Was this review helpful?

  • grandmaR's Profile Photo

    Canal Street at Bourbon Street

    by grandmaR Updated Nov 11, 2009

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Bourbon meets Canal from the Neutral Zone

    Argueably the most famous street in New Orleans is Bourbon Street. Canal Street must be a close second. When I do a search on Bourbon Street in New Orleans I get half a million hits, and about the same when I search on Canal Street.

    This picture is from the Neutral Ground (which is what they call the middle of Canal between the French Quarter and the Garden District) at Carondelet/Bourbon. The streets change names at the Neutral Ground. Although the New Orleans motto — Laissez les bon temps rouler or Let the good times roll is exemplified by Bourbon Street, you wouldn't know it by looking during the day from Canal Street.

    We walked around on Bourbon Street on the first night we arrived, and then didn't get back there again because there were too many other things to do.

    Related to:
    • Trains
    • Beer Tasting
    • Food and Dining

    Was this review helpful?

  • doug48's Profile Photo

    canal street

    by doug48 Written May 25, 2009

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    canal street

    canal street is located in the heart of new orleans and separates the french quarter from the commercial district. canal street is lined with high rise hotels, restaurants, bars, and stores. there is a trolley line on canal street which begins at the mississippi river and goes to the superdome.

    Related to:
    • Business Travel
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • grandmaR's Profile Photo

    Streetcars in the Neutral Ground

    by grandmaR Updated Dec 19, 2005

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Streetcar tracks from the Street Car
    4 more images

    Post Katrina Note: I heard on the TV this morning (12-19-05) that all the new red streetcars were reported to have been destroyed in Katrina. The Riverfront Line is running using the historic St. Charles Line cars since the St. Charles Line infrastructure has also been destroyed.

    -----------------------

    I dimly remember riding the Canal Street streetcar when I visited in 1950. (I was only in 7th grade at the time, and it was quite a number of years ago.)

    For some reason I assumed that New Orleans would be the same as I remembered. I was surprised to find that in the mid 1960's, the Canal Streetcar was discontinued, and replaced by air-conditioned diesel busses traveling down the median in its place. Ugh.

    The Canal Street Line had just recently been reinstated when we visited in December 2004. Full service had begun on April 18, 2004. The 24 bright red streetcars are equipped with air conditioning (which we didn't need to use since it was cold, but I'm sure people who visit in the summer will be glad of), ADA-compliant wheelchair lifts, and were assembled in New Orleans by Regional Transit Authority craftsmen.

    They were designed to resemble the historic Perley-Thomas streetcars and they travel from the Mississippi River (where the Riverfront line is), along Canal Street, to the Cemeteries.

    Related to:
    • Budget Travel
    • Family Travel
    • Trains

    Was this review helpful?

  • el_ruso's Profile Photo

    Canal Street

    by el_ruso Updated Sep 5, 2005

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    This is a wide and elegant street showcasing the belle epoque architecture. It connects New Orleans to Metairie (western suburb).

    You can catch a streetcar for an incomparable journey to the Garden District to the West where you can view stately residences, old trees and visit the Audobon park and zoo at the end of the line.

    Was this review helpful?

  • grandmaR's Profile Photo

    Gallier Hall

    by grandmaR Updated Jul 30, 2005

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Gallier Hall

    Built between 1845 and 1853, Gallier Hall served as New Orleans' City Hall (the actual name was Municipality Hall) for approximately 100 years. I guess that's why I thought the City Tour guide said it was the City Hall. It's name now reflects the fact that the architects were James Gallier Sr and Jr. (they pronounced it Gaul-ee-er since they were Irish, not French). The Galliers were leading New Orleans architects -- they also designed the old French Opera House, the original St. Charles Exchange Hotel, and the Pontalba Buildings.

    Many important people in Louisiana history lay in state in this building - in the distant past, Jefferson Davis and General Beauregard, in the more recent past, New Orleans music legends Ernie K-Doe and Earl King to name a few

    Gallier Hall was discovered to be infested with termites and had to have extensive treatment and renouvantion.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel
    • Business Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • keeweechic's Profile Photo

    Canal Street

    by keeweechic Updated Jul 30, 2003

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    A canal was originally proposed for this area but was never completed. The street now is a four to six lane thoroughfare from the waterfront to Interstate 10 and City park. During colonial times, this street was made up of the western wall of the original settlement which was the French Quarter. Today it is a main road with shops, restaurants and trams travelling back and forth.

    Was this review helpful?

  • Jim_Eliason's Profile Photo

    Canal Street

    by Jim_Eliason Written Feb 25, 2003

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Canal street marks the dividing line between the French Quarter and the modern downtown of New Orleans

    Related to:
    • Family Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • acemj's Profile Photo

    CBD

    by acemj Updated Nov 23, 2002

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Poydras Street is the heart of the Central Business District and is worth a quick look. I took an hour and walked from the Quarter up to the Superdome.

    Was this review helpful?

  • keeweechic's Profile Photo

    Hibernia Bank Building

    by keeweechic Written Oct 26, 2002

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Built in 1920 at a height of 355ft, this building was the tallest building in New Orleans from 1920-1965. The World Trade Center building is now the tallest.
    .

    Was this review helpful?

Instant Answers: New Orleans

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

67 travelers online now

Comments

View all New Orleans hotels