Vacherie Things to Do

  • Things to Do
    by calcaf38
  • Things to Do
    by calcaf38
  • Things to Do
    by calcaf38

Most Recent Things to Do in Vacherie

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    Climb on the levee

    by calcaf38 Updated Aug 9, 2010

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    You don't see the river while traveling in this area. For flood control, the river is always behind high levees. One of the spots where you can see the river is right in front of Oak Alley: you can park your car and climb on top of the levee. I didn't realize the river was there myself, until I saw the mast of a cargo ship passing behind a hill!

    To understand better, you may watch the video I took.

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    Unique Laura Créole Plantation

    by calcaf38 Updated Aug 9, 2010

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    I arrived at the Laura Plantation and was asked: "Do you want the tour in English in 45 minutes, or the tour in French right now?" I didn't expect to get a private tour with an intern from Toulouse, but I did. The visit was very interesting, with rich details about the dysfunctional family who owned the estate during its prime. Much attention is given to the difficult subject of slaves. Jarringly - but perhaps justly so - the price of slaves is given in Dollars... and Euros.

    Is is actually in the slave cabins of the Laura Plantation that the Br'er Rabbit stories were put down, from Senegalese oral tradition stories.

    A good bit of the Laura house burned down recently. Much of what we see is, in fact, rebuilt (with French government money). At $18, the entrance is a bit steep. However, the Laura Créole Plantation is an ideal contrast with the differently superb Oak Alley next door.

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    Continue West on Route 18

    by calcaf38 Written Aug 9, 2010

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    Nottoway Plantation House, along the way

    I didn't have a plan for where to spend the night after visiting the two plantations. I just kept driving on Route 18. It was - for the most part - a wonderful drive: gorgeous green fields, the odd plantation, forlorn villages, and, now and then, an apocalyptic petrochemical plant. I slowed down to criss-cross Donaldsonville, a town with charm to spare but it also looked abandoned with nowhere to grab a bite or to sleep. After Donaldsonville, I took Route 405, always close to the river without ever seeing it.

    I should have stopped while I was ahead, like in Plaquemine. But before I knew it, I was approaching Baton Rouge. Every time I exited the freeway, I ended up in industrial wastelands. I was so tired and hungry. I finally stopped in St Francisville, dead on my feet. And I had started the day in Picayune, Mississippi!

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    Incomparable Oak Alley Plantation

    by calcaf38 Updated Aug 9, 2010

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    Oak Alley is one of the top plantations in Louisiana, and it is easy to see why. The house is beautiful, well restored, and the park - especially the approach to the house - is staggeringly beautiful.

    The visit ($13) is conducted by young girls in hoop skirts, in a slightly mechanical fashion. Photos are prohibited inside. The subject of slaves is dealt with in passing. There are no slave cabins on display. The agricultural aspect is not broached.

    Be sure you climb on the levee to get a feel of how close the river is to the house (see video).

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    Most Famous Plantation Restoration

    by grandmaR Updated Jan 6, 2005

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    From the side garden

    This plantation has a tremendous live oak street of trees leading to the house from both directions. They were planted in the early 1700s - many years before the house was built here in 1839. It is one of the most famous plantations in this area and is on the Mississippi.

    When we visited, there was a riverboat cruise ship at the levee in front of the house. There are also a lot of school children here.

    The plantation is furnished with reproduction furniture - it is not original. The one piece that interested me was the rolling pin bed, which I had never heard of before. (The rolling pin shaped piece on the top was used to smooth out the mattresses in the morning - she said they were stuffed with Spanish moss). I did hear the same story later in St. Martinville.

    Regular Admission
    Adults (19 yrs.& over) $10.00
    Students (13 to 18 yrs.) $ 5.00
    Children (6 to 12 yrs.) $ 3.00

    AAA and Active Military Discounts - $1.00 off regular admission.
    Personal checks and Credit Cards are not accepted for tour admission.

    Behind the house were the slave quarters, which the information said that they found the sites through magnetic imaging. Bob said he didn't think there would have been much metal in those homes, so he didn't see how magnetic imaging would work.

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    • Museum Visits
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Vacherie Things to Do

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