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  • LoriPori's Profile Photo

    BALTIMORE NEIGHBOURHOODS

    by LoriPori Written Sep 26, 2006

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    Favorite thing: Baltimore is blessed with many and diverse NEIGHBOURHOODS.

    INNER HARBOUR
    Baltimore's most popular maritime neighbourhood. Take in the National Aquarium, take a stroll along the waterfront. check out the shops and restaurants in Harbourplace, take a water taxi, tour the Baltimore Maritime Museum & board the Chesapeake and the U.S.S. Consteallation.

    CANTON
    Founded more than 200 years ago by Captain John O'Donnell who sailed into Baltimore from China and named his plantation after the Chinese port that had brought him much wealth. Canton is home to Polish churches and numerous shops, lively bars and acclaimed restaurants.

    FEDERAL HILL
    A trip to Federal Hill isn't complete without a visit to Cross Street Market, he block-long enclosed marketplace. Check out the view from the park at the top of Federal Hill.

    FELLS POINT
    This maritime community was settled in 1730 by William Fell, a Quaker shipbuilder from Lancaster, England. Today the 14 block area is one of the few remaining downtown waterfront communities on the East Coast. There is an abundance of ethnic restaurants and cozy pubs.

    LITTLE ITALY
    Just 12 blocks total, yet Little Italy has an abundance of charm and a sizeable number of trattorias. So if you're in the mood for "Italian" it's worth the pilgrammage to the harbourfront's southeast corner to get your teeth into a bowl of fettucine, a plate of lasagna or a delectable slice of tiramisu. YUM!

    MOUNT VERNON
    Walking, is the best way to explore this majestic neighbourhood, the cultural center of Baltimore. The highlights of a visit here are the Walters Art Museum, the Enoch Pratt Free Library and the Washington Monument.

    View of Mount Vernon from our suite at  Temont Walters Art Museum Enoch Pratt Free Library Inner Harbour - Water Taxi Little Italy - Restaurant
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  • littlesam1's Profile Photo

    Take a Walk in Canton

    by littlesam1 Written May 21, 2004

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    Favorite thing: Canton is one of the area's in Baltimore that have been recently renovated and tourist friendly. There are sidewalks and trails along the water front and through the marina's. You will find many restaurants and some great photo oppotunites along this portion of the harbor. Not as crowded as The Inner Harbor area, Canton is fast becoming more or a tourist attraction almost daily.

    This is a fun picture taken along the water front in Canton with some whimsical street art.

    Larry with some street art.

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  • littlesam1's Profile Photo

    View from Canton

    by littlesam1 Written May 21, 2004

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: Here is a view of the Baltimore skyline from Canton. This part of the city was once all water front warehouses and not very attractive. Many of the warehouses have been renovated and are now loft apartments and offices. Much of the area has been cleared out, cleaned up, and ready for photography.

    The view from Canton

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  • ellielou's Profile Photo

    how to read an address

    by ellielou Written Jan 25, 2006

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: While this doesn't work everywhere in the city, Fells Point, for example, most of the central core is divided between Charles Street, which runs north to south and divides the city between east and west, and Baltimore Street, which runs east and west and divides the city between north and south.

    For example, going to an adddress in the 1800 block of E. Baltimore Street, you would be 18 blocks east of Baltimore and Charles Streets.

    Pretty simple, huh?

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  • LoriPori's Profile Photo

    MOUNT VERNON PLACE UNITED METHODIST CHURCH

    by LoriPori Updated Sep 25, 2006

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: Located on the north east corner of the Washington Monument, at 10 East Mount Vernon Place, the MOUNT VERNON PLACE UNITED METHODIST CHURCH is a rarity in Baltimore architecture as it is a Gothic building. The high peaked roof soars above the nave, resting on ten granite columns. The unique exterior of the building is due to its walls of green serpentine, grey stone and sandstone. I was completely in awe of this structure, which was completed on November 12, 1872. It is so overwhelmingly beautiful. Too bad it was closed when we were there. I would have loved to see the interior. On the door was a posting which read. "Tours are conducted from 9:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Monday thru Friday." -- and we were there on a Saturday. Sighhhh!

    Mount Vernon Place United Methodist Church
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  • LoriPori's Profile Photo

    OLD ST. PAUL' S CHURCH

    by LoriPori Written Sep 25, 2006

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: Located at Charles and Saratoga Streets, OLD ST. PAUL'S CHURCH, is fondly known as the "Mother Church of Baltimore". The current building, Italian Romanesque in style with many Tiffany windows, dates from 1856 and is one of the city's architectural gems, as well as a symbol of a vibrant failth community in the Anglican tradition.
    Mon. and Wed. to Fri. Celebration of Eucharist 12:15 p.m.
    Thursday open for prayer and meditation
    Sunday services 8:00 a.m. 10.30 a.m. and 5.30 p.m.
    1-410-685-3404

    Old St. Paul's Church
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  • LoriPori's Profile Photo

    BROMO- SELTZER TOWER

    by LoriPori Updated Sep 26, 2006

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: The clock tower above Orioles Stadium is the BROMO- SELTZER TOWER. The inventor of Bromo-Seltzer, Captain Isaac Emerson had this tower built at 312 -318 West Lombard St. and South Paca St. next to his factory which obviously no longer exists. Modelled after the Palazzo Vecchio in Florence, Italy, the Bromo-Seltzer Tower has been a Baltimore landmark since 1911.
    The Tower is not accessible to the public.

    Bromo-Seltzer Tower
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  • Ask the Locals!

    by Jabberjenn Written Jun 6, 2004

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: I understand that in this day and age of technology, so much research can be done over the Internet. But if you really want to get out there and experience Baltimore for all that it has to offer, ask the locals!

    If you're walking through the Inner Harbor and want to experience some great Maryland seafood, think twice before you stroll into Phillip's Seafood. Although it does boast great harbor-front views, this chain restaurant is over-priced and doesn't offer the true spirit of Maryland seafood. Ask around. Talk to the guy selling souveniers, or to the girl walking through the mall....I'm sure they'll offer up better seafood choices, like Obrycki's (http://www.obryckis.com/index.asp), or perhaps Bertha's (734 S. Broadway, in Fells Point).

    Want to chug a few beers? Don't waste your time at your hotel bar! Ask the young bellman or the hip front desk chick where THEY go drinking with friends. I'm sure they'll avoid telling you of the tourist traps, and will most likely recommend the places they go to delve into great beers and local microbrews. For example, The Wharf Rat, with two locations (one in Fells Point, and one across the street from Camden Yards) offers amazing beers, including beers by Oliver's Breweries Ltd., which are made at the Wharf Rat Brewery in downtown Baltimore.

    No matter what your interest, no matter what you hope to see and do when in Baltimore, don't forget to ask the locals! We'll be more than happy to point you in the right direction...tell you a quicker way to get to your destination...and recommend some great places to eat, drink, and be merry.

    So gather up as much information you can on the Internet, highlight key areas on your map of Baltimore, but when push comes to shove, ask one of us locals when you see us on the street. We open our arms to tourists, and would love to help make your visit to Baltimore unforgettable!

    Ask the locals for things to see and do!

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  • dlandt's Profile Photo

    Local architecture

    by dlandt Updated Aug 9, 2004

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: Baltimore as a city has a certain feel to it that is brought home to the visitor through its architecture. i'm not talking about glass and steel McSkyscrapers, I'm talking about where people live. This picture gives you a good example because a lot of Baltimore just looks like this. Perhaps to others it is really nothing, but to me it is unique, not quite colonial and not quite strictly utilitarian.

    Fondest memory: Baltimore has a feel that in some ways is like my own city, kind of hardworking and tough. But Baltimore really has a sense of history that Chicago doesn't have and that's what really intrigued me. It doesn't have the same kind of pretentious intellectual underpinnings that nearby Philadelphia seems to have, but just kind of reverberates with something smart and different. This street could be anywhere in Baltimore

    Some street

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  • Hopkid's Profile Photo

    Visitor's Center

    by Hopkid Updated Sep 19, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: Baltimore has a pretty fancy visitors center located at the Inner Harbor. It's a mostly glass structure which lets in a lot of light and provides a festive atmosphere. There are racks of brochures and guides to just about every activity one can image from shopping, museum going, sporting events, live music, and performance arts. The friendly staff are very willing to help and answer any questions a visitor may have. This is a perfect place to start your visit to this fascinating city.

    The visitors center is located at 401 Light Street. You can give them a call at 877-BALTIMORE and/or visit them on the web at www.baltimore.org/visitors/v_vc.html

    Hours are 9am-6pm daily.

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  • grandmaR's Profile Photo

    Traffic Flow

    by grandmaR Updated Sep 8, 2004

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: In the 1940s, Charles Street was one way going south. Then in 1953, a "swaggering, self-taught traffic engineer named Henry A. Barnes" came to Baltimore and changed the traffic flow. In his 1965 autobiography, "The Man With the Red and Green Eyes" he reported that on traffic hearings on the plan to reverse Charles Street, "one female citizen . . . came dripping in mink and exuding all the old airs of historic Baltimore. . . . 'You just don't understand, Mr. Barnes,' she said. 'You're a newcomer here. We have traditions in Baltimore. . . . If you reverse the direction of the street, you're making it easy for the people of South Baltimore to use Charles . . . and they will.'"

    I remember Barnes (I was in HS then). Most of what he did made a lot of sense to me.

    I had a Pittsburgh college friend who came to live in Baltimore. She could not get over how easy Baltimore was to drive in compared to Pittsburgh (and I have to say also compared to D.C. or Boston).

    Fondest memory: One of the things Barnes did was move a lot of monuments out of the middle of streests.

    From a Baltimore City Paper article by Tom Chalkley in 2001:

    "He considered Baltimore's fondness for monuments a monument to municipal insanity: "Next to crab cakes, [monuments] were the citizens' second greatest passion. It didn't matter if the monument was an eyesore, if it was erected to someone who had long since been forgotten, or if it was a menace to their own lives and property." The "worst of these dillies," he wrote, was the pedestal honoring Johns Hopkins, which sat in the middle of Charles near Johns Hopkins University. Nicknamed "The Birthday Cake," the Hopkins shaft had caused a number of fatalities prior to Barnes' arrival. Defying his critics, he moved it to its present-day niche at Charles and 33rd Street, where, Barnes wrote, "the sports fan could view it in awe and admiration . . . after the Orioles had lost to the visiting team.""

    Johns Hopkins statue from Charles Street
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  • grandmaR's Profile Photo

    Original Farm House - Roland Park

    by grandmaR Updated Aug 2, 2011

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    Favorite thing: When it came time for me to go to school, my parents moved from an apartment to a house in Roland Park which is an old established neighborhood in Baltimore. Roland Park was the first planned "suburban" community in North America and it was developed between 1890 and 1920 as an upper-class suburb. The early phases of the neighborhood were designed by Edward Bouton and Frederick Law Olmsted, Jr. A street car line connected it to the city. This line was still in operation on Roland Avenue when we lived there.

    I think my parents moved here so I could go to Roland Park Elementary/Middle School, a K-8 school, which has earned the Blue Ribbon for Academic Excellence from the state department of education.

    Since my dad was an assistant professor with a small salary, they couldn't afford a big house, and we ended up with the original farm house in the district on the fifty cent side of Roland Avenue. (The other side with the big homes designed by Olmsted was the "dollar side").

    When we sold my mom's house after she died, I went back and took a photo of our old house. When we lived there it had brown shingles, red shutters and a white picket fence. My mother put window boxes on the upstairs windows which were to keep us (me) from climbing out onto the roof as my mother thought that would be dangerous. It didn't work.

    Fondest memory: The house had a porch around the front and part of the side. The front door led into what was originally the front parlor. My father used this room as his study. The next room right behind it was our living room and dining room (photo 3 which shows me and my mother's desk with a bust of me as a child, and a photo of my grandmother over it). Back of that was the big farm kitchen. Behind that was the pantry and woodshed. Upstairs there was a front room, a side room and a back room and an indoor bathroom had been sectioned off of the back room. In the basement was the furnace which burned coal. There was a one car garage which was too small even for a 1948 car.

    The street we lived on (St. Johns Rd.) was very narrow (photo 5). People could not park on both sides or no one could drive through. This meant that we were pretty much safe to bike or roller skate or play in the street without fear of traffic

    We lived here from sometime during WWII until 1950 when we moved to Towson

    Now, the shingles have been painted grey, the shutters are white, and the picket fence is gone (photo 2). But the street is still narrow and shady (photo 4)

    House as it was when we lived there House in 2007 Our living room and the front door past me Mother loading the car in front of house 1947 St. Johns Road in 2007
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  • grandmaR's Profile Photo

    Carlin's Ice Rink

    by grandmaR Updated Aug 6, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: When we were little, my mother used to take us to Carlin's to go ice skating. I didn't know it at the time of course, but Carlin’s Park was founded by John Jacob Carlin in 1919 as Liberty Heights Park on 70 acres that had originally been part of the Gittings Estate at Ashburton

    It included a large swimming pool, a roller rink and an ice rink where the Baltimore Orioles, a semi-pro team in the Eastern Hockey League, played. The ice rink was one of the first places Sonja Henie skated in ice shows before becoming famous. Owner John J. Carlin died in May 1954 and in 1956 a fire destroyed the ice skating arena.

    Fondest memory: My mother wanted some family activity that would get my dad some exercise, so we all joined the Ice Club of Baltimore and regularly ice skated at Carlin's. My sister and I practiced the "figures" and did some of the more elementary ice dances and even learned some little jumps and a spin. I remember doing some of the ice dances with a very old man who also went to the roller rink and skated there (this was WAY before in-line skates).

    My mother made our costumes, and the one pictured was reversible - one side was blue and one side was red. We wore danskin tights. If you had looked in the back of my hat, you would have seen a scarf folded up in it so that if I fell, my head would be cushioned. Not only that, but my mother sewed the pompoms on the hats in different places. Mine were on the side because I had a narrow face and my sister who had a round face had hers on top

    We moved to Towson in 1950 and I don't think we went skating after that

    But then when we lived in RI where ice skating was available (like it hadn't been in Key West when we lived there), the older two girls and I joined the ice club in Providence and we all went skating. They did the figures, and the jumps and spins and dances that I had done 25 years before. And I made some of their outfits

    My sister and me at Carlin Me in my hat and my sister in hers At Carlins with a daughter of a friend My mom Me with my sister on the ice
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  • littlesam1's Profile Photo

    The Charles - The Best Movie Theater in Baltimore

    by littlesam1 Written Jun 29, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: There are two well know historic movie theaters in Baltimore, The Senator and The Charles. The Senator is the home to many movie premere's in Baltimore. John Waters premeres his movies at The Senator. Its a big classical theater from the 1930-1940's completely restored. In spite of all of his I consider The Charles to be Baltimores best movie theater. Its historically old also, although not as renovated as The Senator. But The Charles offers more than just the latest Hollywood blockbuster. The Charles shows many foreign films, art films, and also has an ongoing classic movie showing three times a week. There is a wonderful Tapas bar connected to The Charles where you can have a glass of wine before going to the movies. And there is a resident cat living in the lobby. All in all Baltimore's best movie theater.

    For more information check out the link below

    http://www.thecharles.com/

    The Charles

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  • grandmaR's Profile Photo

    Tulips at Sherwood

    by grandmaR Updated Oct 23, 2010

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    Favorite thing: At Sherwood Gardens, approximately 80,000 tulip bulbs are planted annually along with other spring flowering bulbs. Sherwood who planned the gardens often ordered the bulbs he used from the Netherlands. It is now the most famous tulip garden in North America.

    Also dogwoods, flowering cherries, wisteria and magnolias bloom throughout the garden.

    Fondest memory: We used to make a visit to Sherwood Gardens each spring around the end of April or in May to look at the new tulips. This was before Mr. Sherwood died in 1965.

    Tulip at Sherwood 1954 Tulip at Sherwood 1954 Tulip at Sherwood 1954 Looking out over the gardens Tulips and Azaleas
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