Baltimore Off The Beaten Path

  • 1957 - celebrating 150 years of Medical Education
    1957 - celebrating 150 years of Medical...
    by grandmaR
  • My photo Taken from the car 2004
    My photo Taken from the car 2004
    by grandmaR
  • Taken from a car on Greene Street c 1959
    Taken from a car on Greene Street c 1959
    by grandmaR

Most Recent Off The Beaten Path in Baltimore

  • Ewingjr98's Profile Photo

    Babe Ruth Birthplace and Orioles Museum

    by Ewingjr98 Updated Mar 4, 2014

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    I visited the Babe Ruth Birthplace and Orioles Museum as a student, probably way back in 1993 or 1994.

    George Herman "Babe" Ruth was born February 6, 1895 at this home on 216 Emory Street. He lived here until the age of seven, when Ruth's father sent him away to St. Mary's Industrial School for Boys. At this orphanage, Babe Ruth learned to play baseball, and from here he signed his first brief contract with the Baltimore Orioles in 1914. Later that year the contract was purchased by the Red Sox and Ruth's big league career began. While he started as primarily a pitcher, over the next five years his hitting flourished, leading the league in home runs. By 1919, Ruth demanded a salary higher than his $10,000 per year, so the Red Sox were forced to sell him to the Yankees for $100,000. Babe played the next 15 years for the Yankees where he proved himself to be the game's greatest player.

    The museum opened in 1974 and has since expanded to include the new sports museum at the Eutaw Street side of Camden Yards.

    Admission is $6 for adults and $3 for kids, but there is a slight discount is you buy tickets for the Sports Legends Museum at Camden Yards as well.

    Located a block northwest of Camden Yards.

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    Phoenix Shot Tower, aka Old Baltimore Shot Tower

    by grandmaR Updated Sep 19, 2012

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    From the water taxi - is this it?
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    Over 234 feet high, the Shot Tower was the tallest structure in the United States until after the Civil War when the Washington Monument in D.C. was finished. They needed the height because molten lead was dropped from the top of the tower through a sieve and into cold water. This was a relatively labor free way to make round pieces of lead shot. As the pieces of lead fell, they became round. After it was cool, it was dried, polished, and sorted into 25-pound bags.

    The Shot Tower was a lead shot manufacturing facility from 1828 to 1892. It is at southeast corner of Fayette and Front Sts.

    It was the shot tower that gave the former Baltimore pro basketball team its name (Baltimore Bullets). The team moved to Washington D.C., and the name was considered to be not politically correct because of the high murder rate in DC, so it has recently been changed to the Wizards (making the name alliterative again).

    Today only four shot towers remain in existence. Of these four, the Shot Tower is an outstanding example and is a National Historic Landmark. I had a photo that I thought was the shot tower, but when I looked at the web site, it turned out to be just some factory chimney or other.

    According to the National Historic Landmark website, the shot tower is closed to the public. But now it is under the control of Carroll Museums. Phoenix Shot Tower Tours depart from the Carroll Mansion every Saturday and Sunday promptly at 4pm. All visitors must meet the docent at the Mansion by 4pm to participate.

    ADMISSION RATES

    $5 -- Adults
    $4 -- Children (6 -18)
    $4 -- Seniors (65+)
    $4 -- Students (with ID)
    $4 -- Military (with ID)
    Free -- Children (under 6)

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  • iam1wthee's Profile Photo

    Pinball Museum

    by iam1wthee Written Jul 13, 2012

    It is located in the PowerPlant area. Its called a museum because they have a wide range of machines but it really is more of an arcade. They let you play for the amount of hours that you pay. I did not go because their air conditioning was not working and it was 100 degrees every day I was in Baltimore. I just could not take it.

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    Seven Foot Knoll Lighthouse

    by grandmaR Updated Aug 7, 2011

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    Seven Foot Knoll
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    The Seven Foot Knoll Lighthouse is a beautiful red screw pile lighthouse which was at the end of Bodkin Creek, near the Patapsco River. Screw pile lighthouses are suspended above the water by a system of cast-iron pilings with cork-screw-like bases which are screwed into the soft mud of the sea floor.

    The Seven Foot Knoll Lighthouse, which was the second screw pile built on the Chesapeake Bay (dating from 1856), was constructed with nine cast-iron screw piles supporting a gallery deck some nine feet above mean high water. It is the oldest surviving one in Maryland. It was moved to the inner harbor of Baltimore in 1989.

    My husband's (and now my BIL's) home was on Bodkin Creek and they remember this lighthouse when it was active. The shoal is still there (now marked by a simple post) where the waves from wakes and wind would sometimes be 7 to 15 feet or more tall. The last picture is one I painted of Seven Foot Knoll as it would have originally appeared

    The Seven Foot Knoll light is included in the Maritime Museum which also includes the TORSK and CONSTELLATION. Tickets are on sale near the Constellation.
    Children under 5 years - Free
    Children 6-14 years - $3.00
    Adults - $6.00
    Seniors - $5.00

    Winter Hours
    Friday - Sunday: 10:30am - 5:00pm

    Spring hours start in March

    Sunday - Thursday: 10:00am - 5:30pm
    Friday - Saturday: 10:00am - 6:30pm
    Ticket Booth closes 1/2 hour earlier than ships

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  • grandmaR's Profile Photo

    Federal Hill

    by grandmaR Updated Aug 7, 2011

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    Baltimore From Federal Hill, in 1830
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    Federal Hill is a neighborhood primarily of brick, late 19th Century homes. It overlooks the Inner Harbor. The first picture is one I found hanging in my mom's house which purports to be of the view from Federal Hill in 1830.

    One of my friends had a rehabbed home on Federal Hill. It is a federal historic district, and the northern portion has strict preservation and urban renewal requirements. The Historic District has a lot of street festivals and other activities. These are organized through a very active neighborhood organization and business organization, as is the annual Shakespeare on the Hill series of summer performances in the park atop the actual Federal Hill.

    From the harbor, my husband could walk to the Cross Street Market, which is a recently-renovated historic marketplace built in the 19th century, to get supplies when our boat was in the harbor. The primary business district is bounded by Montgomery, Ostend, Light, Charles and Hanover Streets. The neighborhood is also home to the American Visionary Art Museum and Maryland Science Center.

    Significant and historic houses of worship include Christ Lutheran Church, Church of the Advent-Episcopal, Ebenezer African Methodist Episcopal Church, Light Street Presbyterian Church, Lee Street Baptist Church, Holy Cross Roman Catholic Church, and St. Mary's Star of the Sea Roman Catholic Church. I used to drive home from the office through that area.

    During the war of 1812, on the evening of August 24, 1814 people on Federal Hill could see the glow in the sky of Washington burning fifty miles to the south. During the bombardment, Fort McHenry could be “…distinctly seen from Federal Hill, and from the tops of houses which were covered with men, women, and children…the whole awful spectacle of shot and shells, and rockets, shooting and bursting through the air. On the night of the bombardment, not withstanding his extreme indispodition bro’t on by excessive labor and indifference to the symptons of approaching illness, he insisted on remaining at the battery formed by himself [i.e. Leonard Hall] on Federal Hill.”

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    Davidge Hall

    by grandmaR Updated Jul 30, 2011

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    1957 - celebrating 150 years of Medical Education
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    My dad, who was a Professor of Anatomy at the University of Maryland Medical School, was very proud of Davidge Hall because it was the oldest building for medical education still in use. He took a lot of photos of it.

    In "Terra Mariae medicus" in 1965, he wrote an article called

    "ANATOMY: Its history and role in the evolution of the medical curriculum" which contained the following paragraph :
    Obviously, the long battle for the acceptance of dissection as a necessary part of medical education had not yet been won. In spite of this, dissections have been carried out each year since 1807, and the University of Maryland was one of the first schools to make dissection compulsory (1833), even though there was no Anatomical Law until 1882. The winding stairways and escape hatches in the old building now known as Davidge Hall are mute evidence of the hazards and dangers under which the students and professors worked.

    In 1974, Davidge Hall was placed on the National Register of Historic Places, and in 1997, the U.S. Department of the Interior named the building a National Historic Landmark.

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    Battle Of Baltimore

    by Yaqui Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    This city has some very beautiful monument. This one is dedicated to thirty-nine men who died in the Battle of Baltimore, when the British were defeated at North Point and Fort McHenry on September 12, 1814.

    Located at Calvert Street at Fayette Street. It is designed by Maximilian Godefroy in 1825 and composed of Baltimore County marble at the base and column. The beautiful sculptures are of Lady Baltimore and the four griffins that were carved by Antonio Capellano of Italian marble.

    Baltimore Area Convention and Visitors Association
    100 Light Street, 12th Floor
    Baltimore, Maryland, 21202

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  • Tom_Fields's Profile Photo

    National Cryptologic Museum

    by Tom_Fields Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    The National Cryptologic Museum
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    The National Cryptologic Museum tells the fascinating story of cryptology--the science of codes and codebreaking. This ancient discipline has always played a key role in intelligence, which has throughout history helped decide the fate of nations. The museum begins during the early history of our country, tells the story of signal intelligence in the World Wars, the Korean War, the Vietnam War, and the Cold War. It also has some vintage computers from World War II to the 1970s.

    From the Washington-Baltimore Parkway, take Hwy 32 east. Then take the Canine Road exit, and go left over the highway. Take the next left, past the National Vigilance Park (with the aircraft on display), and go past the gas station. The Cryptologic Museum is at the end of the road.

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  • Ewingjr98's Profile Photo

    NSA's National Cryptologic Museum

    by Ewingjr98 Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    The museum just opened in 1993 and houses a wide variety of cryptographic gear used to keep the government's communications secure. 50,000 people visit the museum each year. Admission is free.

    Nearby is Ft Meade.

    Located near the intersection of Interstate 95 and Rt 32 south of Baltimore.

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  • Baltimore Zoo

    by Jabberjenn Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Don't miss the penguins at the Baltimore Zoo!

    The Baltimore Zoo is a great place to visit, and the only reason I listed it as "off the beaten path" is because you will need to take some form of transportation to get there from the Downtown/Inner Harbor area (although it is only a few miles away from the downtown area!) If you wish to drive, don't fret...parking is free!

    The Baltimore Zoo is opened every day, year round. Of course, a great day at the zoo depends on the weather, so you really need to plan accordingly. It really is no fun to walk around the zoo in the very cold winter months, but on that same note, the hot and humid summer days of Baltimore can lead to an equally disappointing visit.

    Because our summers in Baltimore are often accompanied by very very humid days, many of the animals stay hidden in their nooks and crannies to avoid the blazing sun. However, because the zoo is opened each day, you can make a last minute decision on when to visit the zoo based on the weather.

    The zoo opens every day at 10:00 a.m., and this is usually the most crowded time, as many schools, day care centers and youth groups visit at this time. I'd recommend visiting the park anytime after 12 noon, as most of these groups need to leave before school hours end. The park closes weekdays at 4:30, and I have found the hours between 2 p.m. and 4:30 p.m. to be the least crowded. Just remember, the gates close 1 hour prior to closing time. (Closing time on the weekend is 6 p.m.).

    The Baltimore Zoo boasts several distinct sections....with everything from African animals to Polar Bears and penguins. Don't forget to visit the Reptile House! Food stands can be found throughout the zoo, as well as shaded areas and picnic tables to take a break from all that walking! A free tram that takes weary visitors from the African village to the main entrance is also available!

    The Baltimore Zoo is one of the many attractions in Baltimore that appeals to the young as well as the young at heart. Be sure to visit the zoo on your next visit to Baltimore!

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  • Holy Rosary Church

    by steviedee Updated Apr 4, 2011

    This Polish Catholic Church at the southwest corner of Bank and Chester Streets in Upper Fells Point was constructed between 1927-28. The parish had its origins on Eastern Avenue west of Broadway as a split from the mother Polish Church of Saint Stanislaus. In 1926, some 400 pieces of property were purchased comprising one full city block. The magnificent church is constructed of greystone in the Romanesque-basilica style of architecture, and is 200 feet long and 100 feet wide with twin towers 125 feet high. In the north tower is a peal of four bells which have been 'modernised' so they no longer swing, but listlessly tap out their melody with hammers. The interior is unobstructed by pillars, and seats 2000. 2500 can be accomodated. The main marble altar stands 20 feet wide and 30 feet high and weighs 49 tons, of Carrara marble. The exquisite statuary is Spanish. The church still contains its communion rail of marble, and is 80 feet long. Fortunately, the post-Vatican 2 "church-wreckers" did not get ahold of this beautiful church, as it stands in its original glory. Masses in Polish and English are celebrated on Sundays and weekdays. Polish customs such as "Gorzkie Zale" in Lent, May devotions and Rosary devotions in May and October, continue. The Shrine to Divine Mercy is located in the church.

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  • mcdomanski's Profile Photo

    Oldest building still in use for medical ed. in US

    by mcdomanski Updated Apr 4, 2011
    Davidge Hall, University of Maryland Med. School

    Davidge hall was built in 1812. It replaced the original medical school building which had been burnt down...by an angry mob. The source of discontent was that the medical school's practice of performing cadaveric dissection for teaching purposes.

    Notice that Davidge hall has few windows as this was a safety consideration. Donation of bodies for dissection was illegal at this time, and bodies were procured from the local graveyard at Westminster Hall. (Where Edgar Allen Poe is buried) When Westminster Hall was renovated some years ago, many of the gravesites were found to be empty.

    Davidge hall features several hidden staircases and secret passages used to hid the bodies. Today, it is still used for guest lectures and special medical school functions by the University of Maryland.

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  • Ewingjr98's Profile Photo

    Phoenix Shot Tower

    by Ewingjr98 Updated Dec 5, 2010

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    The Phoenix Shot Tower was used to create the small lead balls called "shot." Here lead was dropped from the tower into water at the bottom to create perfect lead balls used in shotguns and rifles. Located in front of Little Italy, the Phoenix Shot Tower was used from 1828 to 1892 to create these deadly projectiles. From the time of its construction until after the Civil War, this tower was the tallest building in the US.

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    Sherwood Gardens

    by grandmaR Written Oct 23, 2010

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    Sherwood Gardens
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    One of the things we did in the spring was go to Sherwood Gardens and see the tulips. That was also one of the things my dad liked to photograph. The gardens are more than six acres in size and have no gates, fences or other barriers although in one of my dad's photos there is a sign saying that because the grounds are wet, they are closed (photo 4). There is no admission charge and a reservation is not required.

    Sherwood Gardens is located one block east of the 4100 block of St. Paul Street. Turn east onto East Highfield Road to reach the gardens. The gardens are bounded by East Highfield Road, Underwood Road, Stratford Road and the Greenway.The public may stroll at leisure through the grounds.

    During the 1800s the property where the gardens are located was a pond on the estate of A. S. Abell, founder of The Baltimore Sun. When the area was developed for housing in 1912 the pond was filled. Stratford Green, one of the original parks laid out by the Olmsted Brothers is included in the garden. John W. Sherwood, local petroleum pioneer and conservationist created most of the garden. Mr. Sherwood imported tulips from the Netherlands, and the gardens became known as the most famous tulip garden in North America. When Mr. Sherwood died in 1965, he bequeathed sufficient funds to continue the gardens for one year. After that, the Guilford Association and the City of Baltimore took over maintenance.

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    Small Conservatory

    by JonBru Updated Aug 10, 2010

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    If you are in the area of the zoo/Druid Hill Park be sure to stop in and see the Rawlings Conservatory. Built in the 1800's, this conservatory is bigger than it appears from the outside and houses plants and trees from Mediterranean, desert, and other climates. There is also a nice outside garden, with picnic tables and an amazing sundial that shows the time for cities from across the globe. We enjoyed it much much better than our visit to the Cylburn Arboretum.

    Hours: Tuesdays through Sundays
    10am - 4pm

    Address: 3100 Swann Drive
    Baltimore, MD 21217

    Directions to the Conservatory
    From the Jones Falls Expressway/I-83 North and South--Take Exit 7/West to Druid Park Lake Drive. At the fifth traffic light (Gwynns Falls Parkway) turn into Druid Hill Park. Make an immediate right after entering the park and the Conservatory will be on your left.

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