Baltimore Off The Beaten Path

  • 1957 - celebrating 150 years of Medical Education
    1957 - celebrating 150 years of Medical...
    by grandmaR
  • My photo Taken from the car 2004
    My photo Taken from the car 2004
    by grandmaR
  • Taken from a car on Greene Street c 1959
    Taken from a car on Greene Street c 1959
    by grandmaR

Most Recent Off The Beaten Path in Baltimore

  • Yaqui's Profile Photo

    Top of the World Observation Level

    by Yaqui Updated Jul 9, 2009

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    World Trade Center to the right.
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    On the 27th floor of the World Trade Center, is a spectacular 360-degree panoramic view of Baltimore in the world's tallest pentagonal building. You can see a breath taking view of other attractions, hotels, sites and neighborhoods. It is a fully handicapped accessible attraction.

    Top of the World Observation Level
    401 E. Pratt Street
    27th floor
    Baltimore, MD 21202

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  • Rebecki's Profile Photo

    OFF TRACK ART

    by Rebecki Updated Jun 13, 2009

    I am a member of an artists' co-op; our gallery is about 40 minutes outside of Baltimore. We opened in February 2009 and feature photography, jewelry, painting, drawings, sculpture - you never know what our group will come up with next!
    The gallery is always staffed by an artist - stop in to meet us and pick up a special gift!

    Gallery hours:
    Monday-Wednesday 12-6
    Thursday/Friday 10-7
    Saturday 10-5

    Off Track Art is located at 11 Liberty Street in Westminster, MD.

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Photography

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  • St. Alphonsus Church

    by steviedee Updated May 1, 2009

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    "The German Cathedral." Once the headquarters for the Redemptorist Order of Priests in America, this fiery orange-brick Gothic structure was designed by famous architect Robert Cary Long, and is patterned after the Cathedral of St. Stephen in Vienna, and is an example of Southern German Gothic architecture. The church was begun in 1842 and completed three years later. It is 154 feet long, 68 feet wide, and the cieling in the main aisle is 50 feet from the floor. The tower, completed a few years later, stands 210 feet high to the top of the cross. The large cross at the apex of the spire is 12 feet high and 12 feet wide and has the symbolic "eye of God" in the centre. The four bells in the tower have been renovated, and unfortunately have been changed from swinging bells, to being tapped by new clappers to simulate swinging bells. The interior is a virtuoso performance of light and colour. Unfortunately, the nave windows are not a credit to the church, and consist mainly of what appears to be mid-nineteenth century pot-metal glass in geometric patterns, not at all lovely. Two smaller windows by Mayer of Munich are high in the sanctuary. The reredos of the main altar is made of wood, loaded with crockets and spires that go almost to the ceiling. The church is loaded with statues, big and small. The ribbed cieling in the nave is exquisite. The church, which has been a Lithuanian national parish since 1917, is, unfortunately shut most of the day. It celebrates Baltimore's only Latin Tridentine Mass every Sunday at 11:30. It is also interesting that two canonized Saints have pastored this church: St. John Neumann, who was consecrated Bishop there in 1852, and Blessed Francis X. Seelos.

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  • Ewingjr98's Profile Photo

    Andrews Air Force Base

    by Ewingjr98 Updated Nov 7, 2008

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Look out for that plane!
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    Andrews is a massive Air Force Base with some 20,000 people stationed here, perhaps it is the second largest USAF base in the world behind Balad Air Base in Iraq? They have a wide variety of aircraft including C-20s, C-21, C-32A, C-37A/B , C-38, C-40B/C, C-130 Hercules, EA-6B Prowler, F-16 Fighting Falcon, KC-135R Stratotanker, UC-12 Huron, UC-35, UH-1N, VC-25A, and most unique is the VC-25A more famously known as Air Force One. Andrews is also home to the Air Force District of Washington as well as its 316th Wing and 89th Wing.

    Andrews is located on the Beltway east of Washington, DC.

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  • grandmaR's Profile Photo

    Westminster Second Presbyterian Church

    by grandmaR Updated May 17, 2008

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    Greene and Fayette St from parking garage
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    In 1950, my parents moved us from Roland Park to Towson and had some renovations done on the new house. The contractor had been doing some work at this church. Standing in front of the church, a stone fell from the steeple and struck him a glancing blow on the head (he had a scar on his forehead) and took off his belt buckle. He said if he had a pot belly, he would have been killed.

    Maybe it was the ghosts from the crypt.

    This church antedated the old Western burial ground by many years. The 1786 cemetery was the final resting place of many notable Baltimoreans (including Edgar Allen Poe). In 1852, Baltimore’s government ordered the removal of all burials within city limits not on land connected to a church building to areas outside city limits. Westminster Presbyterian Church was built to preserve the old Western Burial Ground. The church building was completed in 1852 on arches constructed directly over the burial ground, creating the catacombs below. The plain early Gothic Revival church was constructed of brick with brownstone trim. It is a historic landmark

    In 1977, the church was desanctified and is now in use as a concert, dance, and lecture hall. That is why it is now referred to as Westminster Hall rather than Westminster Church.

    Hours: The cemetery gates are open to the public, daily 8:00 a.m. to dusk.

    Westminster Burying Ground and Catacomb Tours:

    April-July: 1st and 3rd Fridays of each month. (Reservations are required as tours may be canceled for insufficient enrollment.) Special tours may be arranged for groups of 15 or more people.

    Admission: Free; There is a charge for the tour.

    Related to:
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    • Road Trip
    • Historical Travel

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  • grandmaR's Profile Photo

    First Dental College

    by grandmaR Updated Apr 29, 2007

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    Dental school sign
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    When I was growing up (1940s and 1950s), my father taught at the University of Maryland Medical School in the Bressler Building which was on Greene Street next to the Dental School (original dental school building in photo 2). Since then, the Bressler Building has changed its name.

    In the summer of 2004, I had some periodonatal work done at the Dental school, and as I walked to my dental appointment, I saw this sign. It was beside the current University of Maryland Dental School.

    The building that I went to was Hayden-Harris Hall (photo 3), which was built in the 70s. At the time, they were in the process of building a new Dental School building (photo 4)

    It says:


    FIRST DENTAL COLLEGE

    "Baltimore College of dental surgery, first dental college in the world chartered by the General Assembly of Maryland March 6, 1840. Founders were Horace H. Hayden, M.D. D.D.S. and Chapin A. Harris, M.D. D.D.S. The Assembly stipulated by Act of Consolidation April 9, 1924, that the name of the college "shall be preserved as a definite department of the University of Maryland". The name adopted "Baltimore College of Dental Surgery Dental School, University of Maryland" tablet in Hopkins Plaza six blocks east marks original site of the College."

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  • Tom_Fields's Profile Photo

    Historical Electronics Museum

    by Tom_Fields Written Jan 28, 2007
    The Historical Electronics Museum
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    The Historical Electronics Museum is packed with all kinds of military electronic gear. First, the visitor receives a primer on the basic principles of electricity, worked out by scientists such as Faraday, Ohm, Ampere, and Maxwell. Then, it's on to Radio Direction and Ranging (RADAR), radar countermeasures, electro-optics, sonars, navigational systems, and space systems.

    The museum covers the beginning of radar, its use in World War II, the Korean and Vietnam conflicts, the Cold War, and right to the present. All kinds of fun stuff, for anyone with an interest in military, historical, and/or scientific subjects. The museum even has its own radio station. And it's free. The address is:

    1745 West Nursery Road
    Linthicum, Maryland

    Take the Baltimore Washington Parkway (295) south from Baltimore or north from Washington. Turn off at the West Nursery Road exit. The museum is on the left, across from the Marriott Hotel. Hours: 9:00 to 3:00 Monday through Friday, and 10:00 to 2:00 on Saturday.

    Related to:
    • Museum Visits
    • Historical Travel

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  • Ewingjr98's Profile Photo

    Bad Boys

    by Ewingjr98 Updated Dec 2, 2006

    2 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    1 more image

    When I was in San Antonio, I had to make fun of the cops for huddling up in huge groups of 15-20 and, rather than fighting terrorists and murderers, just pulling over people not wearing seatbelts and those who want to drink in public.

    In Baltimore, the cops only travel in twos, but they look ridiculously stupid in their little Mini Cooper (mini copper?) look-a-like cars.

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  • Lost Without a Clue

    by rreschran Updated Nov 14, 2006

    In the past 3-years, I've traveled to Baltimore to teach at the convention center. In the evenings, we travel to the Inner Harbor for dinner and entertainment. Our plan was to go to Obrickies down towards Fells Point, but we decided to go because a hotel clerk said it was within walking distance. An hour later from the hotel, in the dark and not a clue where we were headed, we wound up in blocks of tenaments, many of them burned out, ... a virtual war zone that no unsuspecting tourist should be in after dark. Needless to say, I struck up a conversation with a underground utilities worker asking for directions. When I told him I was from San Diego, we instantly started talking Super Bowl and became instant buddies. When I told him we were lost, his forman chimed in and said he would drive us to Obriskies. We gathered our stuff and got into his truck where he drove us to the front door of Obrickis. I can only say that for a while there, I was horribly afraid for my wife's and my safety, only to be rescued by the cities utility workers. Who say that perfect strangers are dangerous. At least for me, these guys made our night and I will never forget them.

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  • LoriPori's Profile Photo

    BLOB' S PARK IN JESSUP MD

    by LoriPori Written Sep 26, 2006

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    Blob's Park in Jessup
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    Sunday September 17, 2006
    Get-together with Clarence, Ethel, Frank and Zana
    Blob's Park
    8024 Rt. 175 at Baltimore/Washington Parkway
    This place has been around forever. It is family-owned ( Max Blob ). The Hall is plain and set up to feed many people and there is dancing available Sunday afternoons. They do charge a small cover charge of $5.00 to help pay for the two-man band. There wasn't a lot of people there when we went. Mostly us and a small party celebrating a birthday. It was just nice to spend some quiet time with Clarence & Ethel and Frank and even Zana managed to get here for a visit. We all had a bite to eat and Hansi and I did a little dancing.

    Related to:
    • Family Travel

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  • Dabs's Profile Photo

    Baltimore & Ohio RR building

    by Dabs Updated Sep 24, 2006

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    B&O Building
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    This was a another building that I was drawn to as I was walking the streets of Baltimore, the Beaux Arts style B&O Building, built as the headquarters of the Baltimore and Ohio railroad, a statue of Mercury and another statue cradling a locomotive beckoning me inside. The marble lobby was just as grand as I thought it would be, if you find yourself on Charles St., be sure to stop by for a look.

    The 13 story B&O Building opened in 1906, designed by Parker & Thomas in the shape of an H, replacing the former office building that had been destroyed in the Great Fire of 1904.

    Located at 2 N. Charles at Baltimore St.

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  • Dabs's Profile Photo

    Lord Baltimore Hotel

    by Dabs Updated Sep 24, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Lord Baltimore Hotel

    The Lord Baltimore Hotel, currently a Radisson Hotel, is one of the classic grand dame hotels along the lines of Chicago's Palmer House. It was built in 1928, designed by William Stoddart. It was completed right before the depression and right before Art Deco became the popular building style, it's the last high rise in Baltimore built with classical ornamentation. If you're in the area, pop in and visit the lobby, it's not as grand as the Palmer House but it's worth a look.

    Located at 20 West Baltimore St.

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  • grandmaR's Profile Photo

    Lexington Market

    by grandmaR Updated Sep 23, 2006

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    From one garage to the other

    I have not been a fan of Lexington Market because in 1948 when I was 10 years old, my mom took me shopping there and while she was bargaining with a stall holder for a chicken I wandered off from her and was molested by an old wino. So I have not been there in years.

    Lexington Market (which dates back to 1782) has been rebuilt since 1948. The Revitalization was completed in November 2002. According to their website, they have 10 Fresh Produce Stalls, 11 Delicatessen Stalls, 6 Fresh Fish Stalls, 5 Fresh Poultry Stalls, 8 Bakery Stalls, 6 Fresh Meat Stalls, 3 Candy Stalls and an outstanding variety of prepared foods including 6 Seafood and 19 International Cuisine Stalls complimented by over 80 quality vendors selling various foods and general merchandise

    Rachel Ray went there on her "Tasty Travels" TV show Episode RY0212. http://www.foodnetwork.com/food/show_ry/episode/0,2677,FOOD_23076_45725,00.html She got crabcakes at Faidley's.

    Although they have a 4,000 space parking garage (pictured), probably the best way to go there is on the Light Rail. Get off at the Howard Street stop.

    Lexington Market
    400 W Lexington St
    Baltimore, MD 21201

    Monday -Saturday
    8:30 am to 6 pm

    Related to:
    • Road Trip
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    • Food and Dining

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  • Dabs's Profile Photo

    Baltimore Trust Company Building

    by Dabs Updated Sep 23, 2006

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    Mosaic floor
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    I was drawn to the Baltimore Trust Company Building by the art deco exterior topped with a green copper patina and gold leaf roof that I could see towering over the city and thought I would pop in to have a look. The interior of this building was the coolest I saw in Baltimore, intricate mosaic floors, murals displaying Baltimore's history, impressive teller windows designed to make you feel secure enough to put your money in the bank. Ironically, it was built in 1929, right before the stock market crash and Great Depression in the US. The Baltimore Trust Company went belly up two years after moving in and the building sat empty for nearly a decade.

    The building has changed hands a few times since, it's currently known as the Bank of America Building but it was also the Nationsbank Building, the Maryland Bank & Trust and oddly the O'Sullivan Rubber Company Building.

    If you want to read more about this building, here's an interesting %L[ http://www.citypaper.com/news/story.asp?id=2505]article I found.

    Located at 10 Light Street, between Baltimore and Redwood

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  • Dabs's Profile Photo

    "Homicide:Life on the Street" set

    by Dabs Written Sep 23, 2006

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    I'm not sure what I was watching on TV from 1993-1999 when this show was on, but it wasn't this show, I'm pretty sure I never even saw an episode. I think the problem might have been that it was on Friday nights and I never watch TV on Friday night. Yes, I have a VCR, but I tend to never watch anything I tape.

    My friend Ed (kaspian) was a big fan of the show so we made sure to stop by Fell's Point to building that was used as the police station in the series which was almost entirely filmed on location in Baltimore. You'll find this building right next to the water taxi stop in Fell's Point.

    There are probably other locations in nearby Fell's Point and Baltimore that were used in the show but not having watched the show I haven't a clue what they were.

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Baltimore Off The Beaten Path

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