Inner Harbor, Baltimore

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  • Yaqui's Profile Photo

    Cruise The Harbor

    by Yaqui Written Jul 13, 2009

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    Very fun and relaxing to just cruise the harbor and take in the wonderful weather. Great picture taking opportunities too! This is the best way to travel if you want to see all of the Baltimore Inner Harbors attractions. It takes you or picks you up at various landings all over the harbor.

    Inside Route: Inner Basin Landings 1- Aquarium, 2 - Harbor Place, 3- Science Center, 4 - Rusty Scupper, 7 - Harbor East. Transfer at Harbor East for Inside & Express Routes.

    Express Route: Back and forth between Landing 7 - Harbor East and Landing 11 - Fells Point. It also stops at Landing 8 - Maritime Park (during museum hours only) and Landing 10 - Tide Point (please call for pick up) Transfer at Fells Point for Express and Far East/Fort McHenry Routes.

    Far East and Fort McHenry Route:
    Landings 16 - Canton, 14 - Captain James and 17 - Fort McHenry
    (Fort McHenry in season only)

    New in 2009 “Seafarer’s Walk" between Harbor East and Fells Point

    All Day Unlimited Ticket Price:
    (Cash or check onboard or charge at the Visitor Center)
    $9.00 for Adults • $4.00 for kids 10 and under

    Service to Fort McHenry runs April through September 2009.

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    Baltimore Inner Harbor - What a happening place

    by Yaqui Updated Jul 13, 2009

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    Lots of fun here.

    Once you come to Baltimore you have to make a trip down to the Inner Harbor. It has plenty of shopping, restaurants, and all kinds of attractions to see. It's a great place to hangout in evening hours too. Plenty of security around, so you feel safe. I enjoyed my time here very much.

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    Ride the Ducks!

    by Yaqui Updated Jul 11, 2009

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    I would have to say I really had fun taking part in this tour. You will learn some very interesting facts about many of the history of Baltimore. They take you around to many of the landmarks and buildings so you will get a chance to take some photographs. You also get first hand look of the Baltimore Inner Harbor up close in the water. They go out of there way to make it so enjoyable and fun. If you get caught not smiling.....well, you'll find out.;-)

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    Seven Foot Knoll Lighthouse

    by Yaqui Updated Jul 11, 2009

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    Built in 1855, it was an aid to the navigation of the Chesapeake Bay. This lovely Seven Foot Knoll Lighthouse is the oldest surviving screw-pile lighthouse. These innovative screw-pile lighthouses eliminated the need for underwater masonry foundations since it used cast-iron pilings with corkscrew-like bases, which could be screwed into the soft mud of the sea floor. This lighthouse was constructed using nine cast-iron screw piles supporting a gallery deck some nine feet above mean high water in the Chesapeake Bay.

    This lighthouse had three keepers during its history and they usually consisted of a Principal Keeper and two Assistant Keepers. Although officially prohibited at offshore light stations, at least two Keepers lived in the lighthouse with their families. James Bowling lived here with his family as his wife Margaret served as Assistant Keeper and daughter Knolie was born in the lighthouse 1975.

    It continued to serve proudly with other light keepers such as Thomas J. Steinhise risked his life in the face of heavy seas and hurricane force winds to assist the sinking tugboat Point Breeze 1933. It was automated in 1948, but continued to service as a navigation aid till 1988. In 1988 it was finally moved to the Inner Harbor to be preserved with much needed restoration from neglect and the elements. In 1997 it became part of the Baltimore Maritime Museum.

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    WWII Sub Torsk

    by Yaqui Updated Jul 11, 2009

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    WWII Sub Torsk

    USS TORSK was built at the Portsmouth Naval Shipyard and commissioned on 16 December 1944. It was one of only ten Tench Class fleet type submarines and was deployed in the Pacific. It served proudly from 1944 till 1968. It was successful in defending against Japanese hostilities by sinking three Japanese ships before wars end if WWII. It even earned in 1960 a Presidential Unit Citation for service during the Lebanon Crisis and in 1962 the Navy Commendation Medal during the Cuban Blockade. Decommissioned on 4 March 1968, with a career of 10,600 dives, it found a home here in 1972.

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    Lightship 116 "Chesapeake

    by Yaqui Updated Jul 11, 2009

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    Lightship 116 "Chesapeake" was built in 1930 and featured an efficient diesel-electric power-plant with all steel construction. serving for the US Lighthouse Service. It was built in South Carolina at the cost of $274,424 at the Charleston Machine and Drydock Company. It had all the modern amenities such as two-man staterooms for the enlisted men, a crew's mess, and an electrically powered galley and refrigerator unit. Officers (1st and 2nd Officer, Engineer and Assistant Engineer) had their own staterooms adjacent to their mess (dining room), and the Captain/Master as he was called in the Lighthouse Service, had his own stateroom. It served proudly till 1970 when it was eventually replaced by automated light buoys and was thankfully purchased by the park services to be put on display for all those to enjoy its rich history.

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    USCGC TANEY

    by Yaqui Written Jul 9, 2009

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    Just to the right!

    Baltimore Maritime Museum

    When you purchase a ticket this enables you to visit many of the maritime ships that are located along the harbor and including the light house. the last victorious WWII submarine USS Torsk, USCGC Taney the last Pearl Harbor survivor and the Chesapeake 7-Foot Knoll lighthouse that guided so many ships to safety for 33 years.

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    Baltimore Harbor

    by apbeaches Written Jul 15, 2008

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    Baltimore's Inner Harbor has been one of the major seaports in the United States since the 1700s and started blossoming into the cultural center of Baltimore in the 1970s. We enjoyed Baltimore's Inner Harbor and the surrounding neighborhoods because they offered a variety of fine dining, cultural experiences and exciting nightlife.

    We went to the Observation Level of the World Trade Center to the up-close and personal experiences of street performances happening spontaneously at the waterfront, Baltimore’s Inner Harbor offers more to see and do than you might imagine and it’s all within walking distance!

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    Inner Harbor- What a Beauty!

    by RheaM Written Apr 9, 2008

    The Innrer Harbor is Baltimore is so beautiful! The water is sparkly, there are great shops and restaurants, and a nice break from Baltimore's Cityscape. No better place in the world to have a Crabcake, that's for sure!

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    Seven Foot Knoll Lighthouse

    by Tom_Fields Updated Aug 6, 2007

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    The Seven Foot Knoll Lighthouse
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    Built in 1856, this is the oldest "screwpile" lighthouse in Maryland. It stood at the entrance to the harbor for 133 years. Then, it was moved to its present location here at the Inner Harbor.

    The interior has some great models of a few ships which once plied these waters. It also has a diagram showing how the screwpile lighthouse is constructed, and other historical memorabilia.

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    USCGC Taney

    by Tom_Fields Written Aug 6, 2007
    The USCSG Taney
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    The US Coast Guard Cutter Taney is the only vessel involved in the 1941 Pearl Harbor raid which is still afloat. In addition to that fateful day, she saw a great deal of action in World War II and remained in service for years afterward. In fact, this ship was in service from 1936 until 1986.

    She remains in excellent condition. One can see the weapons, the engine room, the bridge, the crew quarters, the crew mess, and nearly everything else.

    One ticket to the Martime Museum covers this ship, the submarine USS Torsk, and the Seven Foot Knoll Lighthouse. Please allow at least two hours to visit all three (more, if you love these things as I do).

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    USS Torsk

    by Tom_Fields Written Apr 7, 2007

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    The submarine USS Torsk
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    The USS Torsk (SS-423) was a Tench-class submarine. Launched at the naval shipyard in Portsmouth, New Hampshire, she was commissioned in December 1944. She had two torpedo rooms, fore and aft.

    She served with distinction in World War II. On August 14, 1945, the Torsk sank two Japanese coastal defense ships--the last enemy vessels to be sunk during World War II.

    After the war, she went through a series of conversions. These included adding the new Snorkel device, which enabled her to operate her diesel engines at periscope depth. In the 1950s, she was armed with the Regulus, an ancestor of the submarine-launched cruise missile of today.

    She participated in numerous training exercises with other NATO warships, and earned a Presidential citation for service in the Lebanon crisis of 1960. The sub also took part in the Cuban Missile Crisis of 1962, winning the Navy Commendation Medal. The Torsk was decommissioned in 1968, and transferred to the Baltimore Maritime Museum in 1973.

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    Lightship Chesapeake

    by Tom_Fields Written Apr 7, 2007
    The Lightship Chesapeake
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    For many years, lightships provided a vital service to sailors entering and leaving ports. These floating lighthouses gave them reference points, and warned them of rocks, shoals, and other hazards.

    The Dry-dock & Machine Company in Charleston, SC built the lightship Chesapeake in 1929. She served until 1970, when she was retired. The ship was put on display in Washington. In 1981, she was transferred to Baltimore.

    She had a crew of 16 men, of whom several would remain ashore at any given time. They would serve two months aboard the ship and have one month off. The ship was diesel-powered, with a top speed of 10 knots. Crew comforts were as good as one could expect in those days, with plenty of fresh water, three toilets with showers, and a permanent cook assigned to the ship.

    The Chesapeake is one of several attractions that make up the Baltimore Maritime Museum. The museum also has a World War II submarine, a Coast Guard cutter, and a lighthouse.

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    USS Constellation

    by Tom_Fields Written Apr 7, 2007

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    USS Constellation
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    This was the US Navy's last all-sail warship. The ship is 186 feet long, with a beam of 42 feet, and built mainly of oak and pine. Her crew consisted of 20 officers, 220 sailors, and 45 Marines. The main armament was 16 8-inch guns, and four 32-pound "long guns". In addition, she mounted two 10-inch pivot guns (one fore and one aft), plus a 12-pounder "boat howitzer". The top speed was about 12 knots.

    Commissioned in 1855, she served for a number of years suppressing the illegal slave trade. During the Civil War, she worked enforcing the blockade of the Confederate states, and also protecting Union shipping from Confederate commerce raiders.

    After the war, she served as a training and practice ship for many years. She was decommissioned in 1933. During the 1950s, the ship was restored and put on public display.

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    The U.S.F. Constellation

    by VeronicaG Updated Feb 7, 2007

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    As we climbed aboard this awesome ship, it was easy to imagine ourselves on the cusp of some historic voyage.

    The U.S.F. Constellation is the oldest ship in the U.S. Navy, commissioned in 1853 and used during the Civil War. It continued in service to the U.S. Navy until after WWII, when it was sent to the Boston Navy Yard, eventually coming to rest in Baltimore's Inner Harbor in 1955.

    An exciting educational program for youngsters ten and up provides a hands-on learning opportunity that teaches them about the lives of young boys who served aboard the Constellation as "powder monkeys"; how they lived on sea and at play at ages 11-18.

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