Inner Harbor, Baltimore

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    U.S.S CONSTELLATION MUSEUM

    by LoriPori Written Sep 25, 2006

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    Launched in 1854, the U.S.S. CONSTELLATION is the last all-sail warship built by the U.S. Navy and is the last remaining Civil War era vessel afloat. Docked in Baltimore's Inner Harbour.
    Begin your visit by purchasing tickets at the U.S.S. Constellation Museum, located on Pier 1, Inner Harbour, next to the ship. Tickets prices to the museum are as follows:
    ADMIRALS: (Seniors age 60+ and active duty military with ID ) $7.50
    CAPTAINS: ( Adults15 - 59 ) $8.75
    MIDSHIPMEN: ( Ages 6 - 14 ) $4.75
    STOWAWAYS: ( Age 5 & under ) Free
    Museum Members - Free

    Hours: Open April to October 10:00 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.
    November to March 10:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.

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  • Visit our Beautiful Inner Harbor!

    by Jabberjenn Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Our beautiful Inner Harbor at night....

    O.K., I realize the Inner Harbor area is probably the most "touristy" area in Baltimore, but it definately is worth a visit!

    The Harbor is surrounded by the Aquarium, World Trade Center, the Gallery Mall, and many waterfront restaurants.

    Grab a beer at Hooters and enjoy the outdoor balcony that overlooks the Harbor, or try one of the many signature brews at the Capital City Brewing Company, which boasts equally great views.

    Chow down at any of of the many waterfront restaurants, then walk off that meal by taking a stroll to the other side of the Harbor and visit our amazing Aquarium.

    When you've had your fill of the Inner Harbor, hop aboard the Water Taxi and enjoy the peaceful cruise which will take you to Fells Point, yet another bar and restaurant hot spot.

    A visit to Baltimore wouldn't be complete without a trip to the Inner Harbor. Come see why so many of us are proud to call Baltimore home.

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    Cruise The Harbor

    by Yaqui Written Jul 13, 2009

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    Very fun and relaxing to just cruise the harbor and take in the wonderful weather. Great picture taking opportunities too! This is the best way to travel if you want to see all of the Baltimore Inner Harbors attractions. It takes you or picks you up at various landings all over the harbor.

    Inside Route: Inner Basin Landings 1- Aquarium, 2 - Harbor Place, 3- Science Center, 4 - Rusty Scupper, 7 - Harbor East. Transfer at Harbor East for Inside & Express Routes.

    Express Route: Back and forth between Landing 7 - Harbor East and Landing 11 - Fells Point. It also stops at Landing 8 - Maritime Park (during museum hours only) and Landing 10 - Tide Point (please call for pick up) Transfer at Fells Point for Express and Far East/Fort McHenry Routes.

    Far East and Fort McHenry Route:
    Landings 16 - Canton, 14 - Captain James and 17 - Fort McHenry
    (Fort McHenry in season only)

    New in 2009 “Seafarer’s Walk" between Harbor East and Fells Point

    All Day Unlimited Ticket Price:
    (Cash or check onboard or charge at the Visitor Center)
    $9.00 for Adults • $4.00 for kids 10 and under

    Service to Fort McHenry runs April through September 2009.

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    WWII Sub Torsk

    by Yaqui Updated Jul 11, 2009

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    WWII Sub Torsk

    USS TORSK was built at the Portsmouth Naval Shipyard and commissioned on 16 December 1944. It was one of only ten Tench Class fleet type submarines and was deployed in the Pacific. It served proudly from 1944 till 1968. It was successful in defending against Japanese hostilities by sinking three Japanese ships before wars end if WWII. It even earned in 1960 a Presidential Unit Citation for service during the Lebanon Crisis and in 1962 the Navy Commendation Medal during the Cuban Blockade. Decommissioned on 4 March 1968, with a career of 10,600 dives, it found a home here in 1972.

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    The USS Constellation

    by dlandt Updated Jan 21, 2005

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    USS Constellation

    Not to be confused withthe aircraft carrier of the same name, this is probably the major tourist attraction in Baltimore. She is fully seaworthy and thus sometimes not to be found because she is at sea. This ship is the original USS Constellation, veteran of the Civil War. Although she is still a fully commissioned warship, I doubt she will be going into battle anytime soon. you can tour her, and she has a small museum open April through October, closing at 5:30, and November through March closing at 4:30. You can actually makie arrangements to stay overnight or experience life onboard the ship through their website.

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    Seven Foot Knoll Lighthouse

    by Yaqui Updated Jul 11, 2009

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    Built in 1855, it was an aid to the navigation of the Chesapeake Bay. This lovely Seven Foot Knoll Lighthouse is the oldest surviving screw-pile lighthouse. These innovative screw-pile lighthouses eliminated the need for underwater masonry foundations since it used cast-iron pilings with corkscrew-like bases, which could be screwed into the soft mud of the sea floor. This lighthouse was constructed using nine cast-iron screw piles supporting a gallery deck some nine feet above mean high water in the Chesapeake Bay.

    This lighthouse had three keepers during its history and they usually consisted of a Principal Keeper and two Assistant Keepers. Although officially prohibited at offshore light stations, at least two Keepers lived in the lighthouse with their families. James Bowling lived here with his family as his wife Margaret served as Assistant Keeper and daughter Knolie was born in the lighthouse 1975.

    It continued to serve proudly with other light keepers such as Thomas J. Steinhise risked his life in the face of heavy seas and hurricane force winds to assist the sinking tugboat Point Breeze 1933. It was automated in 1948, but continued to service as a navigation aid till 1988. In 1988 it was finally moved to the Inner Harbor to be preserved with much needed restoration from neglect and the elements. In 1997 it became part of the Baltimore Maritime Museum.

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  • Harbor Cruises

    by Jabberjenn Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    A cruise on the Inner Harbor is a MUST!

    See the Inner Harbor in the most fun and exciting way.....aboard one of the vessels that coast through our beautiful waters.

    The Prince Charming provides a short 60 minute tour of the Inner Harbor for very reasonable rates ($10 per adult, $6 per child). This relaxing, narrated tour will provide information on our Inner Harbor and is perfect for all ages.

    Want something more? How about the Moonlight Party Cruise, which runs on Fridays and Saturdays from 11:30 p.m. to 2 a.m. Dancing, a cash bar, and appetizers complete this adults-only evening on the Harbor.

    Are you looking for a Sunday afternoon getaway? Hop aboard the Champagne Brunch Cruise from noon to 3 p.m. and enjoy the buffet while listening to a live DJ as you sail through the Harbor.

    Regardless of which cruise you choose, you are sure to be rewarded with wonderful photo opportunities, amazing service, and a view of the Inner Harbor you certainly will never forget.

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    Lightship 116 "Chesapeake

    by Yaqui Updated Jul 11, 2009

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    Lightship 116 "Chesapeake" was built in 1930 and featured an efficient diesel-electric power-plant with all steel construction. serving for the US Lighthouse Service. It was built in South Carolina at the cost of $274,424 at the Charleston Machine and Drydock Company. It had all the modern amenities such as two-man staterooms for the enlisted men, a crew's mess, and an electrically powered galley and refrigerator unit. Officers (1st and 2nd Officer, Engineer and Assistant Engineer) had their own staterooms adjacent to their mess (dining room), and the Captain/Master as he was called in the Lighthouse Service, had his own stateroom. It served proudly till 1970 when it was eventually replaced by automated light buoys and was thankfully purchased by the park services to be put on display for all those to enjoy its rich history.

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    Feed the Ducks or Ride the Ducks

    by grandmaR Written Aug 3, 2004

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    Kids on the Duck

    As I drove home from celebrating my mom's 95th birthday, I saw this Duck on Light Street. When the kids on it saw me taking their picture, they all waved and called to me.

    I have not taken this tour. Their website says: "..tour Charm City. See the Washington Monument, Edgar Allen Poe’s Grave, Camden Yards and the Carroll Mansion. Learn a little and laugh a lot along the way. Then SPLASH into the Inner Harbor for a relaxing cruise—all on board ONE amazing vehicle."

    2004 Ticket Prices
    Adults (Age 13 and up) $24.00
    Children (Age 3 – 12) $14.00
    Seniors/Military $23.00
    Prices include tax.

    The trip takes about 80 minutes.

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    USCGC TANEY

    by Yaqui Written Jul 9, 2009

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    Just to the right!

    Baltimore Maritime Museum

    When you purchase a ticket this enables you to visit many of the maritime ships that are located along the harbor and including the light house. the last victorious WWII submarine USS Torsk, USCGC Taney the last Pearl Harbor survivor and the Chesapeake 7-Foot Knoll lighthouse that guided so many ships to safety for 33 years.

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    Inner Harbor

    by Dabs Updated Sep 25, 2006

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    Inner Harbor
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    Most locals would understandably categorize the Inner Harbor as a tourist trap. It's similar to how Chicagoans view Navy Pier, we understand why people go there but it wouldn't be top on OUR list of places to visit, everything is overpriced, restaurants are mostly mediocre restaurants or chains and 99% of the people you encounter aren't from there. But the Inner Harbor is really hard to avoid, it's part of the center of the city (unlike Navy Pier in Chicago) and you'll most likely find yourself going past it or through it sometime during your stay. You'll also find several of the attractions that draw tourists to Baltimore-the National Aquarium, the Maryland Science Center, the American Visionary Art Museum among them.

    Head here for the museums, to check out the visitor center, if you need to pick up a water taxi, if you have fussy eaters amongst you and need to eat at a chain restaurant or pick up a gift. It's also a nice place to take a walk and do a little people watching.

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    Maritime Museum

    by dlandt Updated Dec 1, 2004

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    Chesapeake

    The maritime museum is a somewhat informal affair priced at $7 for adults. You can walk around a few ships, relatively at ease. They have a coast guard cutter, a light ship, a submarine, and a few others.

    The museum is spread across a number of piers in the inner harbor area. At the foot of each pier is a large number of shops and restaurants, along with some number of amusements.

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    Ride the Ducks!

    by Yaqui Updated Jul 11, 2009

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    I would have to say I really had fun taking part in this tour. You will learn some very interesting facts about many of the history of Baltimore. They take you around to many of the landmarks and buildings so you will get a chance to take some photographs. You also get first hand look of the Baltimore Inner Harbor up close in the water. They go out of there way to make it so enjoyable and fun. If you get caught not smiling.....well, you'll find out.;-)

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    Baltimore Inner Harbor - What a happening place

    by Yaqui Updated Jul 13, 2009

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    Lots of fun here.

    Once you come to Baltimore you have to make a trip down to the Inner Harbor. It has plenty of shopping, restaurants, and all kinds of attractions to see. It's a great place to hangout in evening hours too. Plenty of security around, so you feel safe. I enjoyed my time here very much.

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    Go Aboard The USS Constellation

    by AKtravelers Updated Jun 20, 2006

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    Maura and John tour the Constellation's gun deck
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    If you're visiting Baltimore's Inner Harbor, you can't miss the USS Constellation, its tall masts soaring above the crowds. We always found its sleek lines pleasing as the sloop floated in front of the Light Street Pavillion, but we never really considered going aboard until the last few years. But, with its restoration and the construction of a small quay-side museum, we recently decided to check it out when Andrea's brother came to town. What a great idea!
    The USS Constellation is one of only two surviving American-built wooden warships and was the last completely sail-powered ship ever constructed by the U.S. Navy. The original USS Constellation was the first ship ever commissioned by the U.S. Navy, but that vessel was scuttled in 1853 and replaced with this sloop of war (if you're curious, the newest USS Constellation is an aircraft carrier which Kevin boarded in San Diego in 2002).
    The version of the Constellation in Baltimore served in active duty from 1854-1864, chasing down slave tradeers and prowling the Mediterranean Sea during the Civil War. It was never involved in a battle but did get to fire its guns in anger as it returned to Norfolk in December 1864. A steam-powered Conferederate blockade runner was spotted, but fled into the wind as the Constellation, feeling the full weight of its obselescence, fired futilely into the breeze, unable to pursue.
    We learned all this interesting information on our second visitand more, with Kevin's parents in 2006. On a Sunday in June, we went aboard and our visit coincided with a fascinating tour given by the ship historian. He even read excerpts from the diaries of crew members! Check the website for the daily schedule so that you can time your visit to coincide with his brief. You'll be happy you did.

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