USS Constellation, Baltimore

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  • USS Constellation
    by starship
  • USS Constellation Museum
    USS Constellation Museum
    by Africancrab
  • USS Constellation Museum
    USS Constellation Museum
    by Africancrab
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    USS Constellation Museum

    by Africancrab Written Aug 14, 2012

    This is the starting point of the tour of the actual ship. Once your purchase your ticket, you go left to the entrance to the ship. The museum houses some artifacts from the times when the ship was still in commission. Information about the ships ventures, the captains and stations.

    We did tour it before going to the ship as it was a one way to the ship and another out. If you do not tour it before heading to the ship, then you have no opportunity of doing so on the way out. Perhaps you can go back and show your receipt, but I'm not sure if that would work.

    It is worthwhile to get background information on the ship prior to going in. The brochure you get on the way in provides, just as much information. Nothing beats museums though!

    USS Constellation Museum USS Constellation Museum USS Constellation Museum USS Constellation Museum USS Constellation Museum
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    USS Constellation

    by Africancrab Written Aug 13, 2012

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    This is a must see when in Baltimore. We started our tour of the 4 ships here. I thought it was the best of all 4 because of it's history and timeline. During its high time, it was charged with intercepting vessels engaged in slave trade off the coast of west Africa. History of the ship records that while in West African waters, the Constellation captured 3 slave ships, 1 of which had on board 705 African slaves destined for the Americas.

    We started the tour with a short time at the museum right at the entrance. It is a one way in and another out so no coming back to where you entered. Take time to look at the museum, it is informative and has some artifacts from way back when.

    The ship has four different levels each with interesting functions. I took quite a few shots at different levels, see if you can identify anything you see. Highly recommended.

    The Anti-Slave trade Flagship
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    U.S.S. Constellation Historic Ships Museum

    by starship Updated Aug 24, 2009

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    Another jewel in the crown of historic ships that line Baltimore's Inner Harbor is the USS Constellation. Built in Norfolk, Virginia, and launched in 1854, the USS Constellation was "the last all-sail warship built by the US Navy... the only Civil War era vessel still afloat." She is a sloop-of-war and the second of the three US naval ships to carry the USS Constellation name. Perhaps the Constellation's most historic missions were to disrupt the slave trade, and much later she played a role in delivering famine relief to Ireland. Today as she sits at anchor in Baltimore's Inner Harbor, she has lived on as a sort of floating classroom since approximately 1999..

    Visitors will be interested to find artifacts and belongings of sailors and are welcomed to explore four decks accessed by ladders: The top or spar deck where the helm is located; gun deck where the ship's main battery of guns, the Captain's Cabin and the Galley are located; berthing deck where crew lived; ship's hold where food, water and gear for a crew of 325 was stowed.

    Most appealing are the overnight onboard adventures that can be arranged for groups and several special tours which can bring to life the history of this historic ship. It's a very hands-on experience for children and they interact act with costumed guides. The "Powder Monkey
    Tour" is especially great for young boys (or girls) where they learn about the lives of the "young boys who served as powder monkeys during the Civil War. Young "recruits" will find out through demonstrations and hands-on activities, how lads from eleven to eighteen lived in Mr. Lincoln's Navy. Powder Monkey Tours provide the visitors with an exceptional glimpse into mid-19th century American naval life through the unique perspective of the young boys who served on fighting ships as powder monkeys."

    Tickets can be purchased online or in person and in conjunction with viewing historic ships of the Baltimore Maritime Museum.

    Captain (Adult, 15-59): One ship - $10.00; Two ships - $13.00; Four ships - $16.00
    Admiral (Senior, 60+): $8.00 $11.00 $13.00
    Midshipman (Youth, 6-14): $5.00 $6.00 $7.00
    Stowaway (Child, 5 & Under) Free Free Free
    Military Personnel (w/ ID) Free Free Free

    The USS Constellation is open daily except Thanksgiving Day, Christmas Day, and New Year's Eve Day.

    courtesy of website

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    USS Constellation

    by Tom_Fields Written Apr 7, 2007

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    This was the US Navy's last all-sail warship. The ship is 186 feet long, with a beam of 42 feet, and built mainly of oak and pine. Her crew consisted of 20 officers, 220 sailors, and 45 Marines. The main armament was 16 8-inch guns, and four 32-pound "long guns". In addition, she mounted two 10-inch pivot guns (one fore and one aft), plus a 12-pounder "boat howitzer". The top speed was about 12 knots.

    Commissioned in 1855, she served for a number of years suppressing the illegal slave trade. During the Civil War, she worked enforcing the blockade of the Confederate states, and also protecting Union shipping from Confederate commerce raiders.

    After the war, she served as a training and practice ship for many years. She was decommissioned in 1933. During the 1950s, the ship was restored and put on public display.

    USS Constellation The ship's main gun deck A guide fires one of the guns The ship's wheel and compass The officers' wardroom
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    The U.S.F. Constellation

    by VeronicaG Updated Feb 7, 2007

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    As we climbed aboard this awesome ship, it was easy to imagine ourselves on the cusp of some historic voyage.

    The U.S.F. Constellation is the oldest ship in the U.S. Navy, commissioned in 1853 and used during the Civil War. It continued in service to the U.S. Navy until after WWII, when it was sent to the Boston Navy Yard, eventually coming to rest in Baltimore's Inner Harbor in 1955.

    An exciting educational program for youngsters ten and up provides a hands-on learning opportunity that teaches them about the lives of young boys who served aboard the Constellation as "powder monkeys"; how they lived on sea and at play at ages 11-18.

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    USS Constellation

    by rafgys Written Nov 2, 2006

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    The USS Constellation was the last all sail warship built by the US Navy. It's a gorgeous ship... right in the center of the Inner Harbour, and it's open to the public. I didn't go in because it was too late, but I'm sure it's worth the visit.

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    U.S.S CONSTELLATION MUSEUM

    by LoriPori Written Sep 25, 2006

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    Launched in 1854, the U.S.S. CONSTELLATION is the last all-sail warship built by the U.S. Navy and is the last remaining Civil War era vessel afloat. Docked in Baltimore's Inner Harbour.
    Begin your visit by purchasing tickets at the U.S.S. Constellation Museum, located on Pier 1, Inner Harbour, next to the ship. Tickets prices to the museum are as follows:
    ADMIRALS: (Seniors age 60+ and active duty military with ID ) $7.50
    CAPTAINS: ( Adults15 - 59 ) $8.75
    MIDSHIPMEN: ( Ages 6 - 14 ) $4.75
    STOWAWAYS: ( Age 5 & under ) Free
    Museum Members - Free

    Hours: Open April to October 10:00 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.
    November to March 10:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.

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    USS Constellation

    by Dabs Written Sep 23, 2006

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    The USS Constellation, a triple masted sloop of war, sits in the Inner Harbor. Launched in 1854, it is the last Civil War era vessel still afloat.

    You can tour the USS Constellation, currently $8.75 for adults, or you can do like me and just take a picture of it :-) It looked like there might be some fun activities for kids on board, check out the website for more information.

    USS Constellation USS Constellation

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    Go Aboard The USS Constellation

    by AKtravelers Updated Jun 20, 2006

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    If you're visiting Baltimore's Inner Harbor, you can't miss the USS Constellation, its tall masts soaring above the crowds. We always found its sleek lines pleasing as the sloop floated in front of the Light Street Pavillion, but we never really considered going aboard until the last few years. But, with its restoration and the construction of a small quay-side museum, we recently decided to check it out when Andrea's brother came to town. What a great idea!
    The USS Constellation is one of only two surviving American-built wooden warships and was the last completely sail-powered ship ever constructed by the U.S. Navy. The original USS Constellation was the first ship ever commissioned by the U.S. Navy, but that vessel was scuttled in 1853 and replaced with this sloop of war (if you're curious, the newest USS Constellation is an aircraft carrier which Kevin boarded in San Diego in 2002).
    The version of the Constellation in Baltimore served in active duty from 1854-1864, chasing down slave tradeers and prowling the Mediterranean Sea during the Civil War. It was never involved in a battle but did get to fire its guns in anger as it returned to Norfolk in December 1864. A steam-powered Conferederate blockade runner was spotted, but fled into the wind as the Constellation, feeling the full weight of its obselescence, fired futilely into the breeze, unable to pursue.
    We learned all this interesting information on our second visitand more, with Kevin's parents in 2006. On a Sunday in June, we went aboard and our visit coincided with a fascinating tour given by the ship historian. He even read excerpts from the diaries of crew members! Check the website for the daily schedule so that you can time your visit to coincide with his brief. You'll be happy you did.

    Maura and John tour the Constellation's gun deck Kevin takes a nap with the Constellation's marines The flag flies over the USS Constellation
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    USS Constellation

    by chewy3326 Updated Jan 15, 2006

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    The USS Constellation is a former warship, now anchored in Baltimore's Inner Harbor. It is one of the most eye-catching objects in the harbor, with three masts and many cannons. You can take tours of the ship for a fee (which we didn't do). It's a nice spot, though I think it would probably usually be overrun with tourists (we came during a windy midwinter day, so we basically shared the entire harbor with about 20-30 other people. Very uncrowded).

    USS Consellation
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    The USS Constellation

    by dlandt Updated Jan 21, 2005

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    Not to be confused withthe aircraft carrier of the same name, this is probably the major tourist attraction in Baltimore. She is fully seaworthy and thus sometimes not to be found because she is at sea. This ship is the original USS Constellation, veteran of the Civil War. Although she is still a fully commissioned warship, I doubt she will be going into battle anytime soon. you can tour her, and she has a small museum open April through October, closing at 5:30, and November through March closing at 4:30. You can actually makie arrangements to stay overnight or experience life onboard the ship through their website.

    USS Constellation
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    USS Constellation

    by acemj Updated Apr 10, 2004

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    The last all-sail vessel ever built by the US Navy is also the only one of its kind still afloat. It's been sitting in Baltimore's Inner Harbor since 1955 and can be toured for a small admission fee.

    May 1 - October 14: 10am - 6pm
    October 15 - April 30: 10am - 4pm
    Extended hours may be available June/July/August.

    Adults $6.50
    Children (6-14 years) $3.50
    Children (Age 5 & under) Free
    Seniors 60+ $5.00

    by day by night

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    USS Constellation

    by Jim_Eliason Written Nov 12, 2006

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    This is the last surviving ship of the Civil war and the last all sail ship built by the US navy. The ship is now a museum in Baltimore inner harbor.

    USS Constellation USS Constellation USS Constellation USS Constellation USS Constellation
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