Amtrak / Commuter Rail, Baltimore

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  • Baltimore Train Station
    Baltimore Train Station
    by Gillybob
  • Train station interior
    Train station interior
    by Gillybob
  • Ticket counter and machines
    Ticket counter and machines
    by Gillybob
  • olddude's Profile Photo

    Weekend Travel

    by olddude Written Dec 6, 2013

    Just an update for everyone. The MARC train now runs on weekends. This is great for tourists needing a better way to get from Baltimore to DC and back on the weekends. Bonus....the fare is the same as during the week for commuters. $7 one way from Baltimore to DC.

    http://www.pasadenavoice.com/blog/weekend-marc-service-begins-tomorrow#.UqJo2flwqSq

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  • travelfrosch's Profile Photo

    MARC Commuter Train

    by travelfrosch Updated May 14, 2013

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    MARC train arrives at Camden Station
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    An excellent way to get to Baltimore from Washington DC is to take the MARC Commuter Train's "Camden Line." It's somewhat slow (about 1 hour 15 minutes), and doesn't run terribly often (only during the morning and evening commutes Monday-Friday), but it's cheap and convenient. The train drops you off at Camden Station, within easy walking distance of Camden Yards, Ravens Stadium, and the Inner Harbor. To/From Washington's Union Station, fare is $7 1-way, $14 round trip. 10-ride tickets and monthly passes are available.

    For Baltimore Orioles baseball games (Monday-Friday evening games only), a special bus service returns fans to Washington. Buses depart for Washington 20 minutes after the game ends. Cost is $10 at the bus. Valid MARC tickets are accepted, though sometimes the attendant will try to get you to pay $10 anyway. Be firm, and you will eventually be allowed to board.

    Update: I can no longer vouch for the reliability of the return bus to Washington DC. We tried to use this service recently and were refused boarding due to lack of buses. If you do plan to use this post-game service, be prepared to find another means of transportation to get back to Washington, such as the Amtrak train from Penn Station (departures at 11:45PM and 12:50 AM, 45 minutes, cost $14).

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  • Gillybob's Profile Photo

    Train to/from BWI

    by Gillybob Written Jul 15, 2012

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    Baltimore Train Station
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    Baltimore is connected to it's airport by a train service which runs from Baltimore Penn Station. ARC trains run a service to Baltimore Airport (code BWI) where free shuttles run from the Marshall Rail Station to the airport terminals.

    Services operate on weekdays only (no weekend services) with stops located on the lower level terminal roadway.

    Shuttle buses from BWI to the train station operate every 12 minutes from 05:00 to 01:00 daily and every 25 minutes between 01:00 and 05:00.

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  • travelfrosch's Profile Photo

    Baltimore's Penn Station

    by travelfrosch Updated Sep 27, 2009

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    Penn Station
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    The main rail station in Baltimore is Penn Station, about a 30-minute walk north of the Inner Harbor. From Penn Station, you have the choice of the MARC commuter rail's Penn Line to BWI Airport, Washington, DC and northern Maryland (Monday-Friday only), and AMTRAK rail service to Washington, Philadelphia, New York, and Boston (as well as occasional trains to other destinations such as Chicago and New Orleans).

    Penn Station is also served by Light Rail. A shuttle trolley takes passengers from Penn Station to Camden Yards on the main Light Rail line. A one-way ticket costs $1.60.

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  • Tom_Fields's Profile Photo

    Amtrak at Penn Station

    by Tom_Fields Written Apr 15, 2007

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    Baltimore's Penn Station
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    Amtrak offers regular service between Baltimore's Penn Station and other rail stations on the East Coast, including Washington, New York, and Philadelphia. Riding Amtrak, at least during the week, is a lot better than driving up and down the heavily congested I-95. On the weekend, maybe not.

    The Maryland Transit Authority has a light rail connector train from Penn Station to its main rail line. From the main lobby, follow the signs (to the right) downstairs to the light rail track. The connector train goes up and down the same track all day. It stops right in front Penn Station. Buy your light rail ticket at the machines by the track. The station's address is:

    1515 North Charles Street
    Penn Station
    Baltimore, MD 21201

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  • cachaseiro's Profile Photo

    take the train to baltimore

    by cachaseiro Written Feb 16, 2007

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    cool dudes on the train.

    baltimore is well connected with the other east coast towns by trains.
    i took the train between baltimore and washington DC 3 times and had pleasant journeys all 3 times.

    if you travel between monday and friday then you can save quite a bit of money by taking the commuter train called "marctrain".

    you also have amtrak that travels every day.
    amtrak is a bit more luxorious, but also quite a bit pricier than marctrain.

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    Pennsylvania Station

    by grandmaR Updated Jun 5, 2006

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    Penn Station wasn't always THE Baltimore station. In 1860, Baltimore had five separate railroads but not one passed through the city due to local ordinances.

    The Northern Central Railroad came to northern Baltimore. The Philadelphia, Wilmington and Baltimore terminated on the east side of town, and the Baltimore and Ohio stopped on the southern edge. To get from PW&B to B&O's Camden station the cars were disconnected from the engine, hitched to a team of horses, and pulled through the city.

    The Northern Central station stood on the site of the Sun offices at Centre and Calvert Sts. and the trackbed is now a biking/hiking trail.

    The B&O Railroad (the first railroad in the US - organized in 1827) had trains to New York, Washington, or out to the mid-West via West Virginia. Their Mt. Royal station has been converted to an arts center.

    The PW&B Railroad (absorbed into the Pennsylvania Railroad system in 1902), ran from Baltimore through Maryland towns through Delaware to Philadelphia, Pa.

    The current Penn Station's main concourse has brass fittings, antique wooden benches, and overhead glass skylights. You go down the stairs to the platforms (unlike the B&O Mt. Royal station which was on a single level).

    Penn Station is the fifth busiest in the nation, serving nearly one and a half million rail passengers each year. My sister often comes down to visit our mom from Princeton by AMTRAK. It has:

    • Quik-Trak ticket machine
    • Checked Baggage Service and Redcaps
    • Enclosed Waiting Area
    • Restrooms
    • Payphones
    • Paid Short and Long Term Parking
    • Snack Bar

    It is the terminus for a MARC train line which goes from Washington Union Station to Penn Station via New Carrollton, Bowie State, Odenton, and BWI Rail Station. The MARC trains use the main railroad tracks and run only during weekday commuting hours.

    There is also a Light Rail line (the yellow line) between Penn Station and Cromwell Station in Glen Burnie. You can transfer from the yellow line to the Blue line which goes to BWI anywhere before Linthicum.

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  • frankcanfly's Profile Photo

    MARC Train Service

    by frankcanfly Updated Aug 17, 2004

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    Many people who work in Washington DC, choose to live in the Baltimore area because it is cheaper, less crowded and more down-to-earth.

    A convenient method of commutting to DC is the MARC Train commuter rail line.

    There are several lines. One begins in Perryville, MD up near Wilmington, DE. Another begins in downtown Baltimore. Another begins way out in Martinsburg, WV. The most recent addition is a spur from Frederick, MD.

    Most lines have frequent service 'inbound' to DC in the morning, and 'outbound' in the evening.

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    Amtrak - Penn Station

    by frankcanfly Updated Jan 2, 2003

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    This is a classic train station from the early 20th Century. Inside you'll find aged wooden benchs, a train status board from the 60's, and an "ALL ABOARD" call whenever it's appropriate....

    Most people passing though are on the commuter line to Washington DC.

    It's about 2 1/2 hours to New York from here....

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  • frankcanfly's Profile Photo

    Amtrak - BWI Airport Station

    by frankcanfly Written Aug 17, 2004

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    If you land at Baltimore Washington International Airport (BWI), take the free shuttle to connect to the BWI Amtrak Train Station!

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