Dundalk Travel Guide

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  • Dundalk
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  • Off The Beaten Path
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Dundalk Restaurants

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    Backfin crabmeat

    by RIPKEN_HOF Updated May 19, 2005

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    very good entrees' , a must if you are in the area..or a visitor and want to try Baltimore seafood..

    Favorite Dish: all, steamed crabs

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    • Food and Dining

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Dundalk Transportation

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    Dundalk Marine Terminal entrance

    by grandmaR Updated Apr 4, 2011

    Dundalk Marine Terminal is located adjacent to Seagirt, and major customers include Atlantic Container Line (ACL), National Shipping Company of Saudi Arabia (NSCSA) and Wallenius Wilhelmsen Line. With 13 berths, 10 container and two gantry cranes and direct rail access, the 570-acre (230 ha) terminal remains the Port of Baltimore's largest and most versatile general cargo facility. Dundalk's direct rail access also allows unit trains to routinely deliver dozens of units of farm and/or construction equipment to the terminal at once. Combined with direct rail access provided by Norfolk Southern, Dundalk's size makes it ideal for handling large break bulk and project cargoes

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    • Trains
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    Going south after the toll booth

    by grandmaR Updated Apr 4, 2011

    The Francis Scott Key Bridge is on the Baltimore Beltway between exit 44 and exit 1. It is the only bridge spanning the Harbor and can be seen from Ft. McHenry on clear day.

    The final link in the Baltimore beltway (I-695) was finally finished in 1977, fourteen years after it was started. The Key Bridge crosses the Patapsco River from Hawkins Point to Soller Point, reaching the height of a 36-story building. On a clear day you can see as far as Towson. The name reflects its proximity to where Key watched the bombardment of Ft. McHenry, a view that inspired the Star Spangled Banner. Its steelwork has no expansion joints, making it the 2nd longest continuous truss in the United States. It is maintained by the Maryland Transportation Authority.

    Facts and Figures
    Length: 1.6 miles
    Main Span: 1,200 ft, Height: 185 ft.
    Cost: $141 million

    More than 11-million vehicles used the bridge during fiscal year 2001. You should avoid the bridge and take one of the tunnels if it is very windy or icy.

    The toll for a two-axle vehicle is $2; each additional axle is $2. The tolls are collected in both directions.

    The E-ZPassSM electronic-toll-collection system is available at the Francis Scott Key Bridge

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    by RIPKEN_HOF Written Aug 29, 2005

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    Fourteen years in the making, the final link in the Baltimore beltway (I-695) was finally finished in 1977. Crossing the Patapsco River from Hawkins Point to Soller Point, the Francis Scott Key Bridge arches over the Baltimore Harbor, reaching the height of a 36-story building. On a clear day you can see as far as Towson. Its name reflects its proximity to where Key watched the bombardment of Ft. McHenry, a view that inspired the Star Spangled Banner. Its steelwork has no expansion joints, making it the 2nd longest continuous truss in the United States. It is maintained by the Maryland Transportation Authority.

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Dundalk Off The Beaten Path

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    by RIPKEN_HOF Written Aug 29, 2005

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    Fort Carroll’s origins date to 1847, when the State of Maryland gave permission to the United States War Department to construct a fort in the shallow water of Soller’s Point Flats to protect the city of Baltimore.

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    • Historical Travel
    • Sailing and Boating
    • Architecture

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Dundalk Favorites

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    Looking toward Baltimore from the Key Bridge

    by grandmaR Written Sep 7, 2004

    Favorite thing: Since the west side of the Baltimore Beltway (I-695) is free and is also shorter than going over the Francis Scott Key Bridge, most people go around Baltimore on the west side. But the toll means that the east side isn't subject to the traffic jams that the west side is. Plus there are three ways to travel on the east side - the Harbour Tunnel, the Ft. McHenry Tunnel and the Key Bridge. So it's worth the extra $2 if you are in a hurry.

    Fondest memory: In the old days, you could get commuter tickets which came in an orange book - one ticket per trip.

    Now we have the E-Z Pass Baltimore Regional Commuter Plan (for two-axle vehicles)* 50 trips for $20, valid for 60 days; the Plan comprises the Baltimore Harbor Tunnel (I-895), the Fort McHenry Tunnel (I-95), the Francis Scott Key Bridge (I-695), the John F. Kennedy Memorial Highway (I-95) and the Thomas J. Hatem Memorial Bridge (US 40); two trips are deducted at the Kennedy Highway and Hatem Bridge.

    If you only make 11 trips, you've already beaten the system, and if you use the full 50 trips allowed it only costs 40 cents a trip instead of $2.00.

    The bad thing about it is that you can't transfer EZ pass from car to car. as easily as with the booklets.

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    • Business Travel
    • Road Trip

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Dundalk Travel Guide
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