Black Heritage Trail, Boston

5 out of 5 stars 6 Reviews

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  • Black Heritage Trail sign
    Black Heritage Trail sign
    by risse73
  • Acorn Street
    Acorn Street
    by Tracyden
  • Black Heritage Trail
    Black Heritage Trail
    by KarenandCory
  • Tracyden's Profile Photo

    Walk the trail

    by Tracyden Written Apr 17, 2011

    This is a shorter trail than the freedom trail and takes you mainly around the Beacon Hill area which is lovely in itself. There are beautiful mansion houses and millionaire's squares. Excellent and very pretty.

    You can use a guide but we just used our guide book. The trail takes you to houses and schools around Beacon Hill

    Acorn Street
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    • Hiking and Walking
    • Budget Travel
    • Historical Travel

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    Black Heritage Trail

    by Hopkid Updated Apr 4, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    For a good part of the 19th century, Beacon Hill was home to a promiment group of African Americans and abolitionists. A wonderfully educational walking tour has been mapped out and is operated by the National Park Service. Although the trail starts at the Shaw Memorial, the base for the trail is the Museum of Afro-American History, housed in what was originally the Abiel Smith School, the first schoolhouse built specifically for the education of African American children, built in 1834. A museum store operated by the National Park Service and the adjacent African Meeting House (1805) are part of the museum complex. Go to the museum store to get a National Park Service pamphlet describing the trail complete with a map. Give yourself at least 3 hours to enjoy the museum and take the walking tour. If the weather is nice, strolling through quiet Beacon Hill and learning a bit of history is a great way to spend a couple of hours. We found it to be very educational, and it didn't hurt that it was a beautiful spring day!

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    • Historical Travel

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    African Americans in Boston

    by risse73 Updated May 10, 2009

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    Follow this historical trail that allows you to imagine what life was like for African Americans back then. The history of oppression, enslavement, challenges and struggles proved to enable this group of Americans to thrive and survive. What a feat! The African Americans in Boston appeared to be the first to be freed from the burdens of enslavement on a social level. They lived their lives as freed men & women, helped to end slavery on a proactive basis, and set up a community in the Beacon Hill area around where this trail is now located.

    To find out more info on this trail, check out this website:

    http://www.afroammuseum.org/index.htm

    Black Heritage Trail sign
    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Historical Travel
    • National/State Park

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    Lewis Hayden House

    by Hopkid Written Nov 26, 2006

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    A stop on the Black Freedom Trail, the house near the corner of Phillips and Grove Streets was the home to Lewis Hayden, a staunch supported of abolition and tireless fighter for the freedom of all African-Americans. Born a slave himself, he escaped to Boston and became a leader of Boston's African-American community. Hayden and his wife operated a boarding house out of their home and also used it as a stop on the Underground Railroad. It was rumored that Hayden kept a stash of gunpowder under the front porch and threatened to ignite it if slave catchers came to kidnap the fugitive slaves that often sought refuge there. Hayden also fought for women's rights and helped found the Boston Museum of Fine Arts.

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    Robert Gould Shaw and 54th Regiment Memorial

    by KarenandCory Written Feb 23, 2006

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    The 54th Regiment of Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry entered the American Civil War in 1863. It was the first black regiment to be recruited in the North.
    Robert Gould Shaw, who was played by Matthew Broderick in the movie Glory, was the white colonel in command. The Robert Gould Shaw and 54th Regiment Memorial is the first site on the Black Heritage Trail.

    Robert Gould Shaw and 54th Regiment Memorial Black Heritage Trail
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    • Museum Visits
    • Historical Travel

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  • African American Heritage Trail

    by zChris Updated Aug 24, 2002

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Winding its way through the north slope of Beacon Hill, the African-American Heritage Trail provides a different perspective on Boston's history. The trail focuses on th African-American community that lived in this part of Boston just following the Revolutionary War, where they were quite prosperous and from which many of the first abolitionist societies grew. The central point of the trail is the African Meeting House where a museum is now located. Unfortunately this intresting and engaging walk doesn't receive nearly as much attention as the oft-walked Freedom Trail, so I encourage you to check it out.

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