Boston Common, Boston

4.5 out of 5 stars 75 Reviews

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  • Boston Common
    by fdrich29
  • Boston Common
    Boston Common
    by antistar
  • Squirrel in a Tree at Boston Commons
    Squirrel in a Tree at Boston Commons
    by atufft
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    Walk the Dog

    by atufft Written Aug 24, 2014

    Boston is very dog friendly. At Boston Commons there are numerous off-leash zones. All owners are expected to pick up after their dog, and aggressive dogs are not allowed. It's a good idea to bring bottled water for your dog because after so much fun running and playing, your dog will work up a thirst. My dog also loves to chase squirrels up into the trees at Boston Commons.

    Whitney and a Great Dane at Boston Commons Off Leash at Boston Commons Boston Terrier and a Red Dog with Whitney Dogs at Boston Commons Squirrel in a Tree at Boston Commons
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    Side By Side With Public Garden

    by machomikemd Written Jul 11, 2014

    The Boston Common actually lies side by side with the Boston Public Garden, both are public parks of which the Public Garden is located a the Western Side and the Boston Common at the East Side. The Bigger and Pentagon Shaped Boston Common is bounded by Beacon Street, Charles Steet, Park Street, Bolyston Street and Tremont Street. The Boston Common is the Oldest Public Park in the United States and was Built in 1634, from a formerly Cow Pasteur Land. This 50 acre (20 hectare) public park is more of an open air park than the smaller Boston Public Park, with more open spaces. There is also a Central Burying Ground in the Park, which is smaller than the Bigger Granary Burying Ground Nearby, which was formerly part of the Boston Common.

    Opens 24/7

    Bus Trolley Stops Massachussets State House at Beacon Street just across the street!
    Nearest MBTA is at Park Station

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    Boston Common

    by antistar Written May 20, 2013

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    A cow pasture for much of its life, Boston Common is now the oldest park in America. The British then used it as a camp before they were turfed out by the Revolutionaries. It was also used for public hangings, notoriously for witches and even a Quaker. Only around 1830 did it become a true park.

    Today it's open, unstructured expanse of grass, paths, a few trees, a Frog Pond, and a few memorials and monuments. It's popular place to stroll, but it's also a place where people gather, to demonstrate, to play music or to make speeches, with both Martin Luther King and Pope John Paul II speaking here.

    It's also popular with bums, especially around the edges and near the metro station. They weren't any trouble on my visit, but reading the warnings on this site suggests that they sometimes can be.

    Boston Common

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    Constitution Museum

    by BruceDunning Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    The museum is open 9-6 in summer and 10-5 in winter. The tour takes maybe1 hour or so. It is free admission. The tour and short movie is good. They have a layout of what the Barbary coastal fights were about in 1800's, typical sailor life descriptions, and large model ship as well as the most interesting person who is actively making more model ships. They are very knowledgeable of how and it takes maybe 2,000-3,000 hours to make a typical model.
    The visitor center was closed, and looked as if it will not reopen. It said permanent closing. No real explanation.

    Hours of operation Museum map of wharfs Model of the USS Consitution Model of 1800's supply ship Visitor Center closed for -whgo knows?
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    Boston in a day

    by gilabrand Updated Jan 3, 2011

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    One day in Boston? While this is not nearly enough to see all the sights, I think you CAN get a feel for this interesting historic city in that short span of time. My host was a Boston clown (no, this is not a joke) who parked his car in a secret spot open only to those in the know, and took me on a whirlwind spin around his city.

    We crossed into town through the Boston Commons and public gardens, a huge park with lawns, a lake, monuments, and best of all, Bostonians in all their diversity. In our brief visit, we saw horse-riding policemen, actors in brass-buttoned jackets and Paul Revere hats, groups of children and adults in face paint and Halloween costumes, and a black doomsday preacher jumping and shouting to some invisible audience.

    Don't miss the Holocaust Memorial, a maze of glass chimneys and tunnels inscribed with the names and numbers of the millions who were murdered for the sole reason that they were Jews. They were gassed and burned and thrown into mass graves, but here their names float on the glass, surrounding you on all sides as you move through the walkway.

    Faneuil Hall, where my clown friend, Rami Salami King of the Balloon-twisters, struts his stuff, churning out crazy balloon hats, is a colorful market with an indoor food court. Across the street is Quincy Market, a historic building with an assembly room and displays on different floors (Note: lots of steps here!). Lots of military paraphernalia and giant battle paintings is all I recall at the moment, but I suppose there was more.

    The Granary burying ground was another stop on our tour, and perfectly timed - it just happened to be Halloween. Actually, this cemetery is smack in the middle of town and with the sun shining bright overhead, it was not all ghoulish. Actors in period costumes and 3-cornered hats stand here and there, regaling you with stories about the people buried here, some of them quite famous. Just reading the inscriptions on the tombstones could keep you occupied for a whole afternoon if you have time to kill (pun intended...). Most heart-wrenching are the tiny headstones for children who died in infancy.

    And then there's shopping, of course. Some people like Filene's Basement, a giant department store with a basement where clothing is dumped all over the place in a disorderly mess that shoppers dig through until they find something that may or may not be a bargain. There are no dressing rooms, so people drop their bags and try things on in the aisles. Personally, I am not a fan. I like bargains, but this is too much of a madhouse for me...

    Paul Revere rides again Faneuil Hall food court Boston Gardens in the fall
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    Walk in Boston Common - Spring Time

    by kehale Written May 12, 2010

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    I love Boston in the springtime... Okay, so I love Boston all the time, but especially in the spring. When spring hits Boston, I love taking a walk in Boston Common. It's absolutely gorgeous. So many beautiful flowers, all the grass and if you're a people watcher like I am, it's a great place to go. A nice little escape from the city itself. I love all of the musicians you find busking around the gardens, and the collection of artists doing their own thing. On a beautiful day there is always something to see! The best part is it doesn't cost a thing! ;)

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    The Lagoon

    by Tijavi Updated Mar 6, 2010

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    Besides George Washington statue, the lagoon is what makes the Public Garden more desirable than the nearby Boston Common. Within the lagoon are several sights including the Swan Boats, which have been a favorite ride since 1877 (although they only operate during the warmer months), and the 1869 bridge by William Preston, which gives New York Central Park's Bow Bridge a run for its dime.

    The area surrounding the lagoon is perfect to while away at least two hours taking photos, admiring the picture perfect landscaping and the people watching.

    The bridge and Back Bay skyline The Lagoon Bridge against gorgeous fall colors A treasure trove for photographers Two lonesome benches Beautiful reflection of the trees and Back Bay

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    Fall foliage

    by Tijavi Updated Mar 5, 2010

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    Autumn is one of the best times to explore New England and you don't have to go far from downtown Boston to do some leaf peeping. Right smack in the middle of the city - in Boston Common and the Public Garden - New England's gorgeous fall foliage are there for everyone to admire.

    Enjoy the photos...

    Red and oranges... ...and yellows... ...and everything hue in between. Fall foliage against the city's skyline... ...and over at the Pru.
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    Parkman Bandstand

    by Tijavi Updated Mar 5, 2010

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    The Parkman Bandstand is a tribute to one of Boston Common's most generous benefactors, George Parkman who bequeathed five million dollars to the park's coffers in 1912.

    With a 'Parkman' name, such act of generosity and selflessness must had not come as a surprise?

    Parkman Bandstand in Boston Common
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    Shaw Memorial

    by Tijavi Updated Mar 5, 2010

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    Just across the State House in Boston Common is a relief that pays tribute to America's progress in its racial history. The Shaw Memorial commemorates the Civil War's 5th regiment that was the first regiment in the Union Army to be consisted of free black men. The memorial is named after its white colonel, Robert Shaw.

    Col Shaw leading his men
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    Commodore John Barry

    by cjg1 Updated Jan 20, 2010

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    Boston Common has a monument in honor of Commodore John Barry. John Barry was also known as "Saucy Jack" during his days as an office in the Continental Navy at the time of the American Revolution. He is credited as "The Father of the American Navy" and as a fellow Navy man I have heard alot about his Naval career.

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    Boston Common

    by cjg1 Updated Jan 20, 2010

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    Boston Comon is always a hub of activity with musical performances, protestors, children playing, bikes, skaters and people out enjoying the day. Boston Common is the country's oldest park; the land was set aside in 1640 as public land.

    There are several monuments throughout the park and some nice benches to sit and relax. In the winter there is ice skating at the Frog Pond with many kids enjoying the winter sport.

    My wife and I recently visited Boston over the Martin Luther King Jr. Holiday weekend. Although it was cold it was considerably warmer than it had been in the past week. We enjoyed walking around the park and people watching; one of our favorite activities.

    My Wife enjoying a beautiful winter day (1/16/10)

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    Frog Pond

    by moiraistyx Written Jan 18, 2010

    The Frog Pond was new to me during this trip. When I lived in Boston back in the early 1990s the Frog Pond was not here. It was a nice surprise to see dozens of children splashing around in the water on a hot summer day. We didn't have any swimming gear for the boys and we weren't able to talk them into taking off their shoes and wading on in, but I did. I'm not sure if I would let them swim in there or not, it looks harmless enough but I would have to know more about some safety and sanitary issues before I let them. I was told by one of the locals that people can skate on the Frog Pond during the winter months. That's awesome since the college rinks are often very busy during their free skate times.

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    THEY ONCE HUNG PEOPLE HERE

    by moiraistyx Updated Jan 18, 2010

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    If there was ever an area in Boston with a long and varied history, it would have to be the Boston Common. The Common was established in 1634 to be used as a public green. Each household was charged 6 scillings to purchase the land. The area was used for grazing, offical functions including hanging, parades and drills. British troops even camped there. Check out the website for some interesting facts regarding the Common. The Common is enclosed by 5 streets, Tremont, Park, Beacon, Charles, and Boylston. The Common hosts a wide variety of functions including concerts, games, speeches and protests. Some famous people to appear here include Martin Luther King Jr., Pope John Paul II and Judy Garland (her largest concert ever was her in 1967). During the winter months, the frog pond is used as an ice skating rink.

    Richie and I brought his boys here this past summer. It was their first trip here so we had to make sure it was memorable. The boys were absolutely thrilled about the frog pond as well as the numerous food and beverage vendors that have now set up shop here. We let them take a break from the walking and play on the playground located next to the frog pond. It was also a good break for me and Richie.

    people relaxing in the commons
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    Once a graveyard, now a park

    by mikey_e Updated Apr 15, 2009

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    Boston Common is a large green space in the centre of the city that, while not being Central Park, still helps to add a bit of nature and serenity to an otherwise busy downtown and financial hub. The Common is an old, established part of the city: it was first founded in 1634, when Boston was a British “city” (more of a large town, given that British population in Massachusetts didn’t rival those in the England). The Commons are the first stop on the city’s Freedom Trail, which is the sightseeing itinerary that is designed to highlight Boston’s role as a hotbed of Revolutionary activity. The Commons is likely a lot more appealing in the summer than it is in early spring, but it is still a pretty site on a sunny day, when the gold dome of the Massachusetts State House (to the north) is glistening in the sun. The Commons is also a gathering place for large protests, although you’re unlikely to be able to witness one like the gathering that converged here in 1965 to protest the Vietnam War.

    The Common towards Park station The Common away from the station Commemorative plaque The Boston Common sign The fountain in the park
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