Bunker Hill, Boston

4 out of 5 stars 24 Reviews

Monument Square, Charlestown, MA (617)242-5641

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  • Bunker Hill Monument. Charlestown, Boston
    Bunker Hill Monument. Charlestown,...
    by antistar
  • Bunker Hill Monument. Charlestown, Boston
    Bunker Hill Monument. Charlestown,...
    by antistar
  • Bunker Hill Monument. Charlestown, Boston
    Bunker Hill Monument. Charlestown,...
    by antistar
  • machomikemd's Profile Photo

    The Famous Battle Site

    by machomikemd Written Jul 9, 2014
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    for Historical and Miltary Battle Junkies, The Bunker Hill Monument is the holy grail in Visiting Boston, as everyone knows, this monument memorializes the famous battle of June 17, 1775 at Bunker at and also at Nearby Breedss Hill, where most of the actual fighting ensued and although a victory by the British, It was a Pyrrhic Victory. The way to the Bunket Hill Monument starts at the Trolley Bus Stop at the Charleston Navy Yard (where the USS Constitution is Docked) as there are no trolley stops going to the hill, you go the hike up to the memorial via Adams Street on a more than 1/4 mile (500 meter) walk.

    The memorial open from 9:00 am to 5:00 pm everyday and admission is free

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  • CEP1863's Profile Photo

    Climb the Bunker Hill Monument

    by CEP1863 Written Oct 26, 2013
    Bunker Hill Monument
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    Bunker Hill was at the end of the Freedom Trail. Having taken a stroll through the beautiful area of Charleston, we arrived at Bunker Hill site of the monument that commemorates the first major and significant battle in the American War of Independence. Running low on ammunition Colonel William Prescott gave the immortal order "Don't fire until you can see the whites of their eyes!" In a Although the British won the battle, the number of casualties that they sustained were significant and it is said that the bravery and strong showing encouraged the Colonial Force to believe that they could eventually defeat the British.

    The monument, that can be seen from some distance away, is even more impressive as you get closer. We walked around the hill first and then went and climbed the 294 stairs to the top of the monument. Admission is free and although space is obviously limited at the top, the views make the climb worthwhile. In the centre of the space at the top is a grille which, when you look down through, you can see all the way to the bottom!

    The monument is open daily from 09:00am until 04:30 pm with opening hours extended until 05:30pm in July and August.

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  • antistar's Profile Photo

    Bunker Hill Monument

    by antistar Written May 26, 2013

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    Bunker Hill Monument. Charlestown, Boston
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    While the Battle of Bunker Hill was ultimately a failure for the colonials, the cost to the British forces was high and the gains small. For the colonials it signified something very important: Their forces were more than capable of going up against the veteran, highly drilled soldiers of the British and putting up a good fight. The fact that the defenders of Bunker Hill only lost because they ran out of ammunition, and resorted to throwing rocks rather than giving up, ensured their bravery became legend.

    Today the famous battle is memorialised by the great obelisk atop Bunker Hill. It's guarded by US Rangers who will give you all the historical information about the battle you could possibly need.

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  • Jim_Eliason's Profile Photo

    Bunker Hill National Monument

    by Jim_Eliason Updated Jan 29, 2013

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    Bunker Hill National Monument
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    This marks the site of the first major battle of Revolutionary war and one that foretold much of what lay ahead for the British. Although the British took the hill they suffered such casualties that they retreated back into Boston and later to New York. You can climb the Monument for a great view over Boston.

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  • BruceDunning's Profile Photo

    Bunker Hill-A Walk Over the Horizon

    by BruceDunning Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    View from Constitution harbor
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    You can see this monument for a long distance. It is in Charlestown, about 6 long blocks from the docks at where the USS Constitution is located. The walk over there seemed a mound too far for me that day, but long range, it looks like a nice place to visit sometime.

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  • apbeaches's Profile Photo

    Bunker Hill

    by apbeaches Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Bunker Hill Monument
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    The Bunker Hill Monument, made entirely of granite taken from a quarry in Quincy, MA, stands 221 feet tall and has 294 steps. Construction, under the direction of architect Solomon Willard, began in 1827, but work was frequently halted as available funds were depleted. To bring the project to completion the Association in 1838 began to sell off the ten acres of the battlefield as house lots, eventually preserving only the summit of Breed's Hill as the monument grounds. On June 17, 1843, with Daniel Webster as orator, the completed monument was dedicated. The Bunker Hill Monument Association maintained the monument and grounds until 1919 when it was turned over to the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. In 1976 the Bunker Hill Monument was transferred to the National Park Service and became a unit of Boston National Historical Park.

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  • donforse's Profile Photo

    Freedom Trail - Bunker Hill Monument

    by donforse Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Colonel William Prescott is believed to have given his famous directive, "Don't fire until you see the whites of their eyes," at the Battle of Bunker Hill fought here on June 17, 1775.

    Home to the first major battle of the American Revolution, the site is marked by a 221-foot granite obelisk. Also on the park grounds are several statues and historical markers.

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  • Paul2001's Profile Photo

    The Bunker Hill Monument and Museum

    by Paul2001 Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    The Bunker Hill Monument.

    The Bunker Hill Monument is the final stop on the Freedom Trail. The monument was built in honour of the hard fought battle that the Patriots fought here against the British on June 15, 1775. The battle was a tactical defeat for them but they did inflict severe casualties upon the British forces. The Patriots were only forced to retreat when they ran out of ammunition.
    On top of what is actually Breed's Hill where most of the fighting took place, is a 200 foot obelisk that you can climb. It is worth for the views but the climb is rather difficult if you are not in shape. At the base of the monument an actor in period clothing demonstrates 18th century musketry.
    Across the street from the monument is a small but good museum which covers the details of the battle. Inside there are many artifacts from the battle and a very good diorama which provides an excellent account of fighting. It cost $5.00 to visit the museum.

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  • PetraG's Profile Photo

    history information and a great view

    by PetraG Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Bunker Hill monument

    The Bunker Hill Monument stands tall at 221 feet. It stands on the site of the first major battle of the American Revolution, fought on Breed's Hill, June 17, 1775. Important to the British occupation of Boston was control of the high ground near the harbor. When colonial forces chose to fortify Charlestown, they bypassed the more dominant "Bunker Hill" and dug in on Breed's Hill which was lower and closer to the water. "Don't fire until you see the whites of their eyes" is the legendary order attributed to Colonel William Prescott to make sure that each shot would count. The poorly trained and ill prepared colonial forces repelled two major assaults by the British Army before retreating. Almost half of the British soldiers were either killed or injured. Although the colonists lost the battle, their bravery and strong showing against the British encouraged them to fight on.

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  • EdinburghRoc's Profile Photo

    Why is this so important The USA lost?

    by EdinburghRoc Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Monument at Bunker Hill
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    Its was not in fact fought here.
    No view to be had not much to see
    Its NOT important!

    Spend more time on the Constitution.

    Which is the oldest floating fighting ship
    The longest is the HMS Victory in the U.K.
    But in dry dock which is 32 years older
    twice as heavy.

    Yeah the British win again.

    Bunkerhill
    This is not your top thing to see or visit in Boston.
    If you have little time miss it and see something else.

    The Constitution + Museum is worth the effort.
    Its just my opinion. The USS Cassin Young can be boarded too.

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  • Ewingjr98's Profile Photo

    Bunker Hill Monument

    by Ewingjr98 Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Bunker Hill from the North End
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    The Battle of Bunker hill was the first battle of the American Revolution where massed formations of Colonists faced formations of British Redcoats. The overconfident British attacked the colonists' fortifications head on and suffered tremendous casualties. Though the British eventually took the hill, the colonists gained confidence and respect while giving the British an embarrassing bloody nose.

    At the top of Breed's Hill in Charlestown, stands the Bunker Hill Monument, commemorating the brave colonists who gave their lives in this victory. The monument is an obelisk which stands 221 feet tall on the highest point in Charlestown. Visitors can walk to the top for a terrific view in all directions. At the base of the monument is a National Park Service visitor's center with several scale models of the battle as well as artifacts from the battle. The park rangers are very knowledgeable and are always willing to answer questions.

    The cornerstone was laid by none other than the Marquis de Lafayette in 1825.

    Bunker Hill the last stop on Boston's Freedom Trail, just after the USS Constitution.

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  • Tom_Fields's Profile Photo

    Bunker Hill

    by Tom_Fields Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    The Bunker Hill Monument in Charlestown
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    The Battle of Bunker Hill took place on June 17, 1775 . Following the minor engagements at Lexington and Concord, this was the first major battle of the War of Independence. Most of the battle actually took place on nearby Breed's Hill.

    The American rebel troops, led by Colonel William Prescott, were dug in on top of the hill. As the British troops, known as Redcoats, advanced up the hill, the Col Prescott told his men "Don't fire until you see the whites in their eyes!" When the British were close enough, the colonials let loose a devastating volley. The British suffered heavy losses before finally taking the hill from the Americans. The Americans had run out of ammunition, so had to retreat. But this battle proved to the Redcoats that putting down the rebellion would be no easy task.

    Designed by architect Solomon Willard, the monument was completed in 1843. It affords a fine view of the city.

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  • emilybcn's Profile Photo

    The whites of their eyes!

    by emilybcn Updated Apr 4, 2011

    Bunker Hill is home to a famous battle fought in the American Revolution, it consists of a small museum and a large obelisk monunument. To climb to the top of the monument there are 294 steps!!! Once you're at the top there is a nice view but there are no open windows. Needless to say the trek was exhausting, however the monument and museum were interesting and the bunker hill area is very pretty. The highlight was the ice cream truck waiting at the bottom of the hill!!

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  • rwlittle's Profile Photo

    Bunker Hill

    by rwlittle Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Bunker Hill, the site of the famous Revolutionary War battle, now has a museum and a monument. The monument is similar in design to the Washington Monument in DC, and you can climb the spiral staircase to the top, and look out windows to see views of neighboring Boston. The museum gives details of the battle of Bunker Hill, with a series of displays with little toy soldiers populating the battlefield.

    The USS Constitution is berthed nearby.

    Be forewarned, parking near the monument is difficult at best.

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  • smschley's Profile Photo

    Bunker Hill

    by smschley Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    In the middle of the picture you can see a 221-foot granite obelisk on the hill. This is the monument to honor the memory of the colonists who died in the Battle of Bunker Hill on June 17, 1775. The colonists were low on ammo and out numbered. The British started coming up the hill. General Putnam had to give the command, "Don't fire until you see the whites of their eyes," so they wouldn't waste ammo. The British came up the hill in one line and they fired. There were big gaps in the British line. There were too many British to hold back and the Americans got defeated. The rebels lost the battle, but nearly half of the 2,200 British troops were killed or wounded, a loss that contributed to the redcoats' decision to abandon Boston 9 months later. The colonists lost between 400 and 600 combined casualties,

    The Bunker Hill Monument Association was incorporated in 1823 for the purpose of purchasing the site of the battlegrounds and constructing on the site a suitable memorial. The Marquis de Lafayette, the celebrated hero of the American and French revolutions, helped lay the monument's cornerstone in 1825. His affection for this site is evident in that though he is buried in Paris, the soil covering him was taken from the hill. Construction finally began in 1827, but work was frequently halted as available funds ran out. The Association in 1838 had to sell off the ten acres of the battlefield for money to complete the project, leaving only the summit of Breed's Hill as the monument grounds. On June 17, 1843, with Daniel Webster as orator, the completed monument was dedicated.

    The Bunker Hill Monument Association maintained the monument and grounds until 1919 when it was turned over to the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. In 1976 the Bunker Hill Monument was transferred to the National Park Service and became a unit of Boston National Historical Park.

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