Faneuil Hall - Quincy Market, Boston

3.5 out of 5 stars 80 Reviews

Been here? Rate It!

hide
  • Entrance to the main building
    Entrance to the main building
    by BruceDunning
  • Faneuil Hall, Boston
    Faneuil Hall, Boston
    by antistar
  • Faneuil Hall, Boston
    Faneuil Hall, Boston
    by antistar
  • machomikemd's Profile Photo

    Night Views of Quincy Market

    by machomikemd Written Jul 10, 2014
    4 more images

    this will be my night pictures of the market

    the Quincy Market is just beside historic Faneuil Hall and is the main destination for tourists and locals mainly to eat Boston's famous seafood offerings and also to buy stuffs like souvenirs and artisanal and delicatessen products. you can partake of various fresh seafood like lobsters, scrod, shrimp cocktail, cod fish, scallops and more at the food court, fine dine along the restaurants or shop at the various artisanal delicatessens or buy souvenir items outside and even drinks at the faux Bull & Finch "Cheers" Bar in the area.

    the historic Quincy market is one of the largest market built in the North East in the 18th century and was named after a famous Mayor of Boston Josias Quincy. The market at present is home to a various number of commercial shops, eateries, delicatessens, restaurants and souvenir shops, the fresh meat section of the Market was moved to other areas of boston and it now have mostly the establishment I mentioned above. the market is two stories tall, 535 feet (163 meters) long, and covers 27,000 square feet (2,500 square meters) of land area and is made of New England Granite and at the center area of the Market in the Domed part sits main dining area for the food stalls at present. Further street vending space is present at the outside walls of the building, especially on the south side, under a glass enclosure. Most stalls in this space sell trinkets, gifts, and other curiosities and also at the second level and basement area.

    Opens: 10:00 am to 9:00 pm everyday

    Related to:
    • Food and Dining
    • Beer Tasting
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • machomikemd's Profile Photo

    Historical Market and Eating Place

    by machomikemd Written Jul 10, 2014
    4 more images

    this will be my things to do tips on Quincy Market

    the Quincy Market is just beside historic Faneuil Hall and is the main destination for tourists and locals mainly to eat Boston's famous seafood offerings and also to buy stuffs like souvenirs and artisanal and delicatessen products. you can partake of various fresh seafood like lobsters, scrod, shrimp cocktail, cod fish, scallops and more at the food court, fine dine along the restaurants or shop at the various artisanal delicatessens or buy souvenir items outside and even drinks at the faux Bull & Finch "Cheers" Bar in the area.

    the historic Quincy market is one of the largest market built in the North East in the 18th century and was named after a famous Mayor of Boston Josias Quincy. The market at present is home to a various number of commercial shops, eateries, delicatessens, restaurants and souvenir shops, the fresh meat section of the Market was moved to other areas of boston and it now have mostly the establishment I mentioned above. the market is two stories tall, 535 feet (163 meters) long, and covers 27,000 square feet (2,500 square meters) of land area and is made of New England Granite and at the center area of the Market in the Domed part sits main dining area for the food stalls at present. Further street vending space is present at the outside walls of the building, especially on the south side, under a glass enclosure. Most stalls in this space sell trinkets, gifts, and other curiosities and also at the second level and basement area.

    Opens: 10:00 am to 9:00 pm everyday

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture
    • Food and Dining

    Was this review helpful?

  • antistar's Profile Photo

    Faneuil Hall

    by antistar Written May 24, 2013

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Faneuil Hall, Boston
    2 more images

    A cornerstone of American philosophy is the "marketplace of ideas", treating opinions like goods and allowing the strongest win through open competition. So it seems fitting that the "cradle of democracy", the Faneuil Hall was donated to the rebellious city of Boston by a merchant of Huguenot lineage and used as a marketplace for goods on the ground floor, and a marketplace of ideas on the floor above. Here in this meeting house the revolutionary thoughts of speakers like Samuel Adams and John Hancock flourished in an atmosphere of hitherto unseen freedom of expression.

    When revolution called the British shut down the meeting house, and free thought, and turned the place into a garrison for their soldiers.

    Was this review helpful?

  • al_mary's Profile Photo

    Faneuil Hall / Quincy Market

    by al_mary Updated Mar 8, 2013
    3 more images

    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    Faneuil Hall is also know as
    Quincy Market, a tourist-oriented
    mall downtown ....

    Monday - Saturday 10 AM - 9 PM
    Sunday - Noon -6 PM

    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    Restaurants and pubs are open late every evening

    Was this review helpful?

  • Pawtuxet's Profile Photo

    Faneuil Hall

    by Pawtuxet Updated Mar 11, 2012

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    There is usually something going on around Faneuil Hall. Walking through the old building...there are numerous vendors on either side of the broad walkway. Each is selling a different kind of food, candy, ice cream, coffee...You can pick up lunch and find a seat in the center area...watching the hundreds of people who pass through each day.
    Outside you find park benches..shopping, nearby restaurants...but best of all are the street entertainers. Jugglers, mimes, all sorts of performers amuse the passerby. Always an active spot just across from the Government Center and a short walk to the Old State House.
    TAKE A TOUR OF BOSTON'S FANEUIL HALL ON THEIR WONDERFUL ACTIVE WEB SITE ~
    FANEUIL HALL

    Related to:
    • Food and Dining
    • Road Trip
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • moiraistyx's Profile Photo

    FANEUIL HALL/QUINCY MARKET

    by moiraistyx Updated Apr 4, 2011

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    FANEUIL HALL

    In 1742, Peter Faneuil, Boston’s wealthiest merchant at the time, had Fanueil Hall built as a gift to the city. The edifice was home to merchants of all types and fishermen. It is best known as being a platform for the country's most famous speakers. The Sugar Act in 1764 was first protested here by the colonists and the doctrine of "no taxation without representation" was established here. Here George Washington toasted the nation on its first birthday. Over the last two and a half centuries Faneuil Hall has played host to many famous speakers including Oliver Wendall Holmes, Susan B. Anthony, Bill Clinton and Ted Kennedy. Fanueil Hall has been nicknamed "The Cradle of Liberty."

    Faneuil Hall was expanded in 1826 to accomodate it's growing clientel and merchants. This is when Quincy Market was added. Quincy Marcket is named for former Boston mayor Josiah Quincy. By the mid-1900's, the buildings of Fanueil Hall and Quincy Marcket had fallen into great disrepair and many stood empty. The vision of Jim Rouse, Benjamin Thompson and Mayor Kevin White, brought these broken down buildings from dilapidated structures to what it is today. This renovation forever changed the look of downtown Boston.

    Today Fanueil Hall and Quincy Market attract more than 18 million visitors annually. Dozens of shops, carts and kiosks make up this wonderful shopping district in downtown Boston. As a college freshman, this was where I went to shop for a dress to wear on my first date with Robert. I also performed my first Kareoke number with my friend Beth here in 1992. This is also the place responsible for all my college credit card debt. Hard core shoppers will find it difficult not to spend a bundle of cash in the varying shops. As a side note, located somewher amogst the shops used to be the best chocolate shop I've ever been to. If it's still there, try the chocolate covered raspberries, they are divine.

    Hours of operation: Monday through Saturday from 10am to 9pm, Sunday from noon to 6pm.
    Restaurants have extended hours.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Women's Travel
    • Budget Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • lynmur's Profile Photo

    Quincy Market

    by lynmur Updated Apr 4, 2011

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Quincy Market isnt just about shopping, there is plenty to see and do. Lots of places to eat when you are hungry and there is quite a few events happening over the course of the year to keep you entertained.
    Faneuil Hall Marketplace is located in the heart of historic downtown Boston. Right next to historic Faneuil Hall is the financial district, the waterfront, the North End, Government Center and Haymarket.
    It is a well-traveled part of Boston's “Freedom Trail.” You’ll also be glad to know there are four hotels within a three-block radius.
    The Cheers bar is here too - although this is the replica Cheers Bar (the real one can be found on Beacon Hill, its a great place to have something to eat and drink.

    Was this review helpful?

  • kazander's Profile Photo

    Faneuil Hall and Quincy Market

    by kazander Updated Apr 4, 2011

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Quincy Market

    Built in 1826, Quincy market was originally an open air food market. Faneuil Hall was constructed in 1776, it was known as "the cradle of liberty". Nowadays, this is the place to go if you want to shop til you drop. It's teeming with people, lots of tourists. There are a million shops and resturants lining the cobblestone streets. You will most likely see a few street performances going on as well. I've found lots of wonderful little things to buy in this marketplace. Most recently Lou bought me the most perfect necklace to wear for our wedding in a little gemstone shop.

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Faneuil Hall

    by grkboiler Updated Apr 4, 2011

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Faneuil Hall in the distance

    Faneuil Hall is a historic building located along the Freedom Trail. It was built in 1742, burnt down and rebuilt in 1761, and served as a town meeting center until the 1800's. The Hall served as an important meeting place for planning the revolution in Boston.

    The 1st floor of the hall is a marketplace with souvenir, craft, and memorabilia shops, and some food shops.

    The 2nd floor is where the actual meeting hall, the Great Hall, is located. Park rangers give brief and interesting lectures on the history and significance of the hall every half hour.

    The 3rd floor contains a museum for the Ancient and Honorable Artillery Company of Massachusetts. The Company was formed in 1638 and has been headquartered at Faneuil Hall since 1746. Most people don't bother going up there, but it is worth a look.

    Faneuil Hall is open daily 9 AM - 5 PM except Thanksgiving, Christmas, and New Year's Day. It is also closed during public functions. Admission is free.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Tijavi's Profile Photo

    Serving its original purpose

    by Tijavi Updated Feb 13, 2010

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Sam Adams' statue in front of Faneuil Hall
    1 more image

    Lovingly known as "Cradle of Liberty," for being the venue of Samuel Adams' impassioned speeches on independence from their British colonial rulers, Faneuil Hall retains its original purpose as focal point of civic life and open debate in Boston. At the time of my visit, the hall was filled with supporters from two candidates for mayor of Boston during a town hall meeting. With the two camps trying their best to outdo the other party with catchy slogans, it was an interesting display of democracy.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • cjg1's Profile Photo

    Historical Faneuil Hall

    by cjg1 Updated Jan 20, 2010

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    4 more images

    Faneuil Hall has been a marketplace and a meeting ceneter since 1742. Several famous people such as Samuel Adams and James Otis gave sppeches to rally support for Indepence from Britain. Fanueil Hall is part of the Freedom Trail in Boston and is a Historic site. Faneuil Hall is named for Peter Faneuil a wealthy merchant who provided the funds for the construction.

    The building itself is impressive with a large cuppola and a grasshopper weather vane.

    Was this review helpful?

  • cjg1's Profile Photo

    Check Out Quincy Market

    by cjg1 Updated Jan 20, 2010

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Me in front of Quincy Market
    4 more images

    Quincy Market is a three-level Greek revival-style building. Quincy Market is a hub of activity with locals and tourist visiting daily for shopping and a bite to eat. The central corricdor of the Market is a large food court with every type of food imagianble from seafood, Greek, Italian, Indian, deserts and ice cream. There are small vendors selling local items and crafts as well as typical chain stores and shops.

    My wife and I enjoy wandering the Market and seeing the sights. The food court is always jam packed and the smell of food gets your tummy rumbling. We spent some type shopping and browsing through stores; which is always a favorite activity of ours. Yes, this is a big "tourist" spot but sometimes it's fun to be a "tourist".

    Was this review helpful?

  • mikey_e's Profile Photo

    The less revolutionary hall

    by mikey_e Written Apr 15, 2009

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Quincy Market
    4 more images

    Quincy Market is not an extension of Faneuil Hall; but the proximity of the two buildings makes visiting the two of them at the same time easy, and makes the choice of deciding what to eat infinitely more difficult. This structure was constructed in the 1820s, in response to the rapid growth of the city of Boston and the need for more commercial space. Part of the harbor was filled in and Quincy Hall, designed by Alexander Parris, was erected on the site. I suppose it could be called an eclectic style building, since the façade features Doric columns but the rest of the building is not entirely in a neo-Classical style. The interior of the market is quite interesting too, with its copula lined with dark wood. Today this is exclusively a food market and you can get all types of Boston specialties here. There are glass annexes that were added in the 1970s, so the building new has one of those hybrid old-new styles. My suggestion is to eat under the copula and the wooden beams.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Arts and Culture
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • mikey_e's Profile Photo

    Cradle of Liberty

    by mikey_e Written Apr 15, 2009

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Faneuil Hall
    4 more images

    Faneuil Hall is probably the oddest part of Boston’s Freedom Trail. It’s not odd because of its design, or because of the original use of the building, but rather because of its current use. Other structures have been maintained in their original purpose (such as King’s Chapel, Park Church and the Massachusetts State House) or have been converted to museums (such as the Old State House). Faneuil Hall, however, is now a crafts market, where you can buy all sorts of overpriced tourist kitsch. It is ringed by modern stores and dozens of little vendors selling, usually, obscene t-shirts and paraphernalia. The original hall was built in 1740-42, although it burnt down and was rebuilt in the 1760s. It was intended to be an English country market, but the Hall soon became known for being a centre of fiery political speech and calls for reform throughout the 18th and 19th century (after the Revolution, it was also a hotbed of anti-slavery activity). The political importance of the hall has remained up to the current period: in 2004, this is where John Kerry conceded the Presidency of the United States to incumbent George W. Bush.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Arts and Culture
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • BruceDunning's Profile Photo

    The Shops are Endless

    by BruceDunning Updated Oct 17, 2008

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    north market
    4 more images

    This scene is not for me, but many-hundreds or thousands come here continually to shop. There are about 200 shops in the three Quincy buildings and then 38 carts outside. You can choose from 16 restaurants or 35 other eating places in the buildings. FAst food to casual. They have Quincy market in the middle and then long buildings called south and north markets bookending that. I am thankful it was not the middle of summer with MAny people and it is hot and muggy. Fall was enough of a gauntlet.

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Romantic Travel and Honeymoons
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

Instant Answers: Boston

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

91 travelers online now

Comments

Hotels Near Faneuil Hall - Quincy Market
4.0 out of 5 stars
3 Reviews
0.1 miles away
Show Prices
4.0 out of 5 stars
2 Reviews
0.1 miles away
Show Prices
4.5 out of 5 stars
1 Review
0.1 miles away
Show Prices

View all Boston hotels