Faneuil Hall - Quincy Market, Boston

3.5 out of 5 stars 81 Reviews

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  • Entrance to the main building
    Entrance to the main building
    by BruceDunning
  • Faneuil Hall, Boston
    Faneuil Hall, Boston
    by antistar
  • Faneuil Hall, Boston
    Faneuil Hall, Boston
    by antistar
  • BruceDunning's Profile Photo

    The Shops are Endless

    by BruceDunning Updated Oct 17, 2008

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    north market
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    This scene is not for me, but many-hundreds or thousands come here continually to shop. There are about 200 shops in the three Quincy buildings and then 38 carts outside. You can choose from 16 restaurants or 35 other eating places in the buildings. FAst food to casual. They have Quincy market in the middle and then long buildings called south and north markets bookending that. I am thankful it was not the middle of summer with MAny people and it is hot and muggy. Fall was enough of a gauntlet.

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    The interior has the history

    by BruceDunning Written Oct 17, 2008

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    Arial of the building
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    The desire of Peter Fanueil was to build a market and hall for the community. He did that in 1742 and in spite of burning in 1761, it was expanded in 1805 to double. Now the hall upstairs is the meeting place ( from the old days) and down is the shops to gifts and candies.

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    The Hall for the People

    by BruceDunning Written Oct 17, 2008

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    Brochure of the hall
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    Peter Faneuil became wealthy from merchant shipping of goods. He wanted to build a market hall for the community and in 1742 that was completed. It burned in the interior in 1761 and took two years to rebuild. Then in 1805 they wanted to expand and solicited Charles Bulfinch, well known architect for the region. He doubled the size of the building without diminishing its style. The hall was used through 1822 at which time they city converted to a council rather than town hall forum. It continued as a meeting hall for issues in the mid 1800's.
    Now besides the preserved hall upstairs, the downstairs is a shopping area for trinkets and gifts.

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    Place to Wander and Relax

    by BruceDunning Updated Oct 16, 2008

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    Adams Protects the square
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    It was first build over 1740-42. A fire in 1761 burned most of it and again rebuilt in 1862 Charles Bulfinch expanded it, nearly doubling the size. It was rebuilt in 1898 to support he structural soundness. A refurbishment was done in 1979 and totally reworked in 1997. Upstairs the grand hall is intact. Downstairs there are shops, just like in the old days to sell goods.

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    Fanuel Hall

    by apbeaches Written Jul 15, 2008

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    We spent a lot of time shopping, eating and snaking here. On the fourth of July, Fanuel Hall was filled with Benjamin Franklin's and Franklin Wanna Bee's. Faneuil Hall is located near the waterfront and today's Government Center, in Boston, Massachusetts and has been a marketplace and a meeting hall since 1742. It was the site of several speeches by Samuel Adams, James Otis, and others encouraging independence from Great Britain, and is now part of Boston National Historical Park and a well known stop on the Freedom Trail.

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    On The Freedom Trail - Historic Faneuil Hall

    by Mikebb Updated Jun 9, 2008

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    Faneuil Hall
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    After having a very nice seafood lunch in the Quincy Market we walked across the open space to the historic Faneuill Hall which has also been known as "The Cradle of Liberty". Built in 1742 as a gift to the city from a prominent merchant, the hall bears his name.

    Known over the years as the place for public speaking it is now part of the the market area with stalls selling all sorts of touristy merchandise, some snack foods etc. Well worth the visit to enjoy this historic place which has been renovated to its original best.

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    A good place to kick off the evening!

    by Jefie Updated May 31, 2008

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    Street action around Quincy Market
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    Having just returned from England, my first reaction when I saw Quincy Market was "cool, I'm back in Covent Garden" - with an American twist of course! Thanks to restoration efforts that were undertaken in the 1970s, Quincy Market and Faneuil Hall have both become tourist must-sees. While Faneuil Hall is home to a tourist information office, a post office and plenty of souvenir shops, Quincy Market offers a wide variety of boutiques (Victoria's Secret, Urban Outfitters, Nine West...) as well as many pubs and restaurants, including the new and bigger "Cheers!". If you're traveling on a budget, you'll be happy to know that there's a food court inside the Quincy Market where you can get a decent meal for just a few bucks. With plenty of street performers, tourists and locals around, there's always a fun atmosphere so it's definitely worth checking it out!

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    VISIT FANEUIL HALL & QUINCY MARKET

    by Rich62 Written May 27, 2008

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    FANEUIL HALL
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    FANEUIL HALL is where the first protest of the Sugar Act took place, and it is here that the concept of "no taxation without representation" was created.

    The adjacent Quincy Market was added in 1826.

    Today you can eat here, buy souveniers, clothing, accessories and such. There are usually street entertainers as well.

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    Faneuil Hall / Quincy Market

    by diver-x Updated Dec 3, 2007

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    Quincy Market building at Faneuil Hall Marketplace

    Faneuil Hall / Quincy Market

    The Faneuil Hall / Quincy Market area is a shopper's paradise. Get all of your Boston souvenirs here! The pedestrian shopping area contains four separate buildings filled with unique shops as well as chain stores. Inside the Quincy Market building, you'll find a plethora of ethnic and American foods to satisfy any appetite!

    Street performers can often be found here in warmer months both in front of Faneuil Hall and in front of the Quincy Market building.

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  • Faneuil Hall Marketplace - Meeting Place

    by LrSorr Updated Mar 24, 2007

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    The Man behind the famous New England beer
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    Your trip to Boston is not complete without stopping here. This place is packed with shoppers, sightseers, diners, etc. This is definitely a meeting place for everyone. One of the best landmarks in Boston area. The area sits on cobblestone promenade where you can also find "entertainers" -- bands, clowns, mimes... they all make the area more lively.

    Quick tips:

    1) North Market and South Market -- offers good sit-down meals and drinks. You will also find various stores from clothing to accessories. Very expensive.

    2) Quincy Market -- fast food-ready-to-go-meals. Plenty of choices. This is a three story building. First floor is all food court, Second floor is a bar. Restrooms can be found in the ground floor.

    3) Faneuil Hall -- rather small. It's a place to buy souveneirs. In the corner is the Information booth where visitors can pick up brochures. Hardly I ever find a personel there answering questions.

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  • Visit with self reservation

    by CTanner Written Jan 14, 2007

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    As with many people who visited Boston, I had to visit this popular area. I believe any person who ever visits boston should stop here, and if you feel the need to eat at one of the shops, do so for lunch and save your appetite for one of Boston's other GREAT dining experiences like Hamersley's Bistro or Legal Seafood. Quincy Market in my opinion has turned into little more than a privately owned fast-food cafeteria/ food-court. There are some okay shops there, but again Gap and the like have begun moving in on the area. Much like Greenwich Village, once someones lease is up and Gap or Ralph Lauren can pay a higher lease rate, the old places move out and the "cookie cutter" consumer market that our country has begun to create, moves in. Stay away from Todd English's place even for lunch, it has his name on it, but if I was him, I wouldnt put my name on it. McCormick and Schmicks is a good idea for lunch (again, they are a chain as well but they are sort of the Morton's Steakhouse of seafood). I still think anyone interested in Boston's heritage needs to visit the area, just don't expect a "classy" or even historic feel to most of the businesses in the area.

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  • Ewingjr98's Profile Photo

    Faneuil Hall

    by Ewingjr98 Updated Dec 3, 2006

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    Inside Fanieul Hall
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    Built in 1742, Faneuil Hall has long been an integral part of downtown Boston. Originally built along the harbor as a marketplace, the city has slowly grown around Faneuil Hall. Today the first floor hosts many souvenir shops, a cafe, and a post office. The second floor is home to the famous meeting hall where the Sons of Liberty, including Samuel Adams, met to discuss the problems with the British government. In later years, the meeting hall was used by such notable people as Frederick Douglass, Susan B. Anthony, Jefferson Davis, and John F. Kennedy. Upstairs from this remarkable meeting hall is the home of the Ancient and Honorable Artillery Company, which was chartered in 1638 (http://www.ahacsite.org/).

    National Park Service Rangers give tours of the 2nd-floor hall every 30-60 minutes throughout the day. It is well worth waiting to hear their stories.

    Faneuil is pronounced "fan-yoll"

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    Quincy Market

    by Ewingjr98 Updated Dec 3, 2006

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    Front of Quincy Market
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    Quincy Market is an area that is difficult to categorize. The area is known for its shopping, but the Quincy Market building houses dozens of small take-out restaurants.

    If you are not in the mood for shopping and eating, Faneuil Hall and Quincy Market are historic locations with impressive architectural significance. As the evening approaches, this area also offers various popular bars such as the Ames Plow Company, the Black Rose, and the Purple Shamrock. There is also a comedy club upstairs in the main building, as well as live music in the streets.

    Want to take a romantic walk through the city? This spot also fits the bill as the trees are beautifully lit with white Christmas-style lights. Columbus park and Long Wharf are also just a short stroll away, and make for nice, peaceful evening spots. From the end of Long Wharf, you can sit and watch the airplanes takeoff and land at Logan Airport across Boston Harbor.

    Sound like a local and pronounce it "quinzy mahket"!

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  • bjwong's Profile Photo

    Quincy Market

    by bjwong Written Dec 3, 2006

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    Just like the colonial markets of old - if the colonists sold mango lassis and teriyaki chicken. Even though it's on the tourist trail this eatery serves up food from all corners of the globe and is a good place to stop for lunch if you are in the middle of walking the Freedom Trail.

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    Shopping and Eating

    by johngayton Written Jun 19, 2006

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    Faneuil Hall from City Hall

    The modern day Faneuil Hall manages to be both a tourist attraction and a local Bostonian grab a bite to eat sort of place, ideal for a takeaway lunch down by the harbour or on the grass of Columbus Park, weather permitting obviously. The building itself comprises three floors, the ground floor being the market stalls and food outlets with an incredible diversity of offerings, Chinese, Chowdah or Chorizo, just to name a few Ch’s. I didn’t have a chance this time round to visit the upper floors but the second floor is staffed by the National Park Rangers and the third contains the museum and armory of the Ancient and Honorable Artillery Company of Massachusetts (to give it its full title).

    A lovely quote from Francis Hatch sums the place up:

    “Here orators in ages past
    Have mounted their attacks,
    Undaunted by proximity
    Of sausage on the racks.”

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