Faneuil Hall - Quincy Market, Boston

3.5 out of 5 stars 88 Reviews

4 S Market St., Boston, MA 02109 617-523-1300

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  • Entrance to the main building
    Entrance to the main building
    by BruceDunning
  • Faneuil Hall, Boston
    Faneuil Hall, Boston
    by antistar
  • Faneuil Hall, Boston
    Faneuil Hall, Boston
    by antistar
  • Tijavi's Profile Photo

    Serving its original purpose

    by Tijavi Updated Feb 13, 2010

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    Lovingly known as "Cradle of Liberty," for being the venue of Samuel Adams' impassioned speeches on independence from their British colonial rulers, Faneuil Hall retains its original purpose as focal point of civic life and open debate in Boston. At the time of my visit, the hall was filled with supporters from two candidates for mayor of Boston during a town hall meeting. With the two camps trying their best to outdo the other party with catchy slogans, it was an interesting display of democracy.

    Sam Adams' statue in front of Faneuil Hall Town hall meeting underway at the time of my visit
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  • moiraistyx's Profile Photo

    Random Monuments and Statues

    by moiraistyx Written Jan 20, 2010

    One thing Boston has a lot of is random statues and monuments. Right in the middle of the Fanuele Hall/Quincy Market shopping district were the shoes of Larry Bird and the statue of Arnold Auerbach. The kids got a kick out of sizing up their feet with Larry Bird and the other guy Bill Rodgers a local running legend. Another really neat statue we saw was of a really tall guy. I think this had to to with the African American Heritage Trail, but I am not sure. Never the less the statue was so huge it was impressive. So keep your eyes open and don't forget to look down, you may miss some interesting things.

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  • cjg1's Profile Photo

    Historical Faneuil Hall

    by cjg1 Updated Jan 20, 2010

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    Faneuil Hall has been a marketplace and a meeting ceneter since 1742. Several famous people such as Samuel Adams and James Otis gave sppeches to rally support for Indepence from Britain. Fanueil Hall is part of the Freedom Trail in Boston and is a Historic site. Faneuil Hall is named for Peter Faneuil a wealthy merchant who provided the funds for the construction.

    The building itself is impressive with a large cuppola and a grasshopper weather vane.

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    Check Out Quincy Market

    by cjg1 Updated Jan 20, 2010

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    Quincy Market is a three-level Greek revival-style building. Quincy Market is a hub of activity with locals and tourist visiting daily for shopping and a bite to eat. The central corricdor of the Market is a large food court with every type of food imagianble from seafood, Greek, Italian, Indian, deserts and ice cream. There are small vendors selling local items and crafts as well as typical chain stores and shops.

    My wife and I enjoy wandering the Market and seeing the sights. The food court is always jam packed and the smell of food gets your tummy rumbling. We spent some type shopping and browsing through stores; which is always a favorite activity of ours. Yes, this is a big "tourist" spot but sometimes it's fun to be a "tourist".

    Me in front of Quincy Market

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  • mikey_e's Profile Photo

    The less revolutionary hall

    by mikey_e Written Apr 15, 2009

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    Quincy Market is not an extension of Faneuil Hall; but the proximity of the two buildings makes visiting the two of them at the same time easy, and makes the choice of deciding what to eat infinitely more difficult. This structure was constructed in the 1820s, in response to the rapid growth of the city of Boston and the need for more commercial space. Part of the harbor was filled in and Quincy Hall, designed by Alexander Parris, was erected on the site. I suppose it could be called an eclectic style building, since the façade features Doric columns but the rest of the building is not entirely in a neo-Classical style. The interior of the market is quite interesting too, with its copula lined with dark wood. Today this is exclusively a food market and you can get all types of Boston specialties here. There are glass annexes that were added in the 1970s, so the building new has one of those hybrid old-new styles. My suggestion is to eat under the copula and the wooden beams.

    Quincy Market The interior of the copula The modern galleries Monument to Boston's sport heroes outside market Another view of the Market fa��ade
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    Cradle of Liberty

    by mikey_e Written Apr 15, 2009

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    Faneuil Hall is probably the oddest part of Boston’s Freedom Trail. It’s not odd because of its design, or because of the original use of the building, but rather because of its current use. Other structures have been maintained in their original purpose (such as King’s Chapel, Park Church and the Massachusetts State House) or have been converted to museums (such as the Old State House). Faneuil Hall, however, is now a crafts market, where you can buy all sorts of overpriced tourist kitsch. It is ringed by modern stores and dozens of little vendors selling, usually, obscene t-shirts and paraphernalia. The original hall was built in 1740-42, although it burnt down and was rebuilt in the 1760s. It was intended to be an English country market, but the Hall soon became known for being a centre of fiery political speech and calls for reform throughout the 18th and 19th century (after the Revolution, it was also a hotbed of anti-slavery activity). The political importance of the hall has remained up to the current period: in 2004, this is where John Kerry conceded the Presidency of the United States to incumbent George W. Bush.

    Faneuil Hall Samuel Adams in front of Faneuil Hall The east side of the Hall Plaque on the Hall's exterior Bronze statue out front of Faneuil Hall
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    The Shops are Endless

    by BruceDunning Updated Oct 17, 2008

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    This scene is not for me, but many-hundreds or thousands come here continually to shop. There are about 200 shops in the three Quincy buildings and then 38 carts outside. You can choose from 16 restaurants or 35 other eating places in the buildings. FAst food to casual. They have Quincy market in the middle and then long buildings called south and north markets bookending that. I am thankful it was not the middle of summer with MAny people and it is hot and muggy. Fall was enough of a gauntlet.

    north market Lean to shelter for carts at Quincy Inside the market Cheers is at the end of a market building Entrance to the main building
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    The interior has the history

    by BruceDunning Written Oct 17, 2008

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    The desire of Peter Fanueil was to build a market and hall for the community. He did that in 1742 and in spite of burning in 1761, it was expanded in 1805 to double. Now the hall upstairs is the meeting place ( from the old days) and down is the shops to gifts and candies.

    Arial of the building Clock and crested eagle The hall with huge painting at the podium Light in hall Eagle carving at Post Office downstairs
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    The Hall for the People

    by BruceDunning Written Oct 17, 2008

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    Peter Faneuil became wealthy from merchant shipping of goods. He wanted to build a market hall for the community and in 1742 that was completed. It burned in the interior in 1761 and took two years to rebuild. Then in 1805 they wanted to expand and solicited Charles Bulfinch, well known architect for the region. He doubled the size of the building without diminishing its style. The hall was used through 1822 at which time they city converted to a council rather than town hall forum. It continued as a meeting hall for issues in the mid 1800's.
    Now besides the preserved hall upstairs, the downstairs is a shopping area for trinkets and gifts.

    Brochure of the hall Picture from Quincy market View through the Quincy street Description of things to do Range view from US 93
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    Place to Wander and Relax

    by BruceDunning Updated Oct 16, 2008

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    It was first build over 1740-42. A fire in 1761 burned most of it and again rebuilt in 1862 Charles Bulfinch expanded it, nearly doubling the size. It was rebuilt in 1898 to support he structural soundness. A refurbishment was done in 1979 and totally reworked in 1997. Upstairs the grand hall is intact. Downstairs there are shops, just like in the old days to sell goods.

    Adams Protects the square Sign in front of building View from the Quincy Market View coming down the path Angle view from Quincy market area
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    Fanuel Hall

    by apbeaches Written Jul 15, 2008

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    We spent a lot of time shopping, eating and snaking here. On the fourth of July, Fanuel Hall was filled with Benjamin Franklin's and Franklin Wanna Bee's. Faneuil Hall is located near the waterfront and today's Government Center, in Boston, Massachusetts and has been a marketplace and a meeting hall since 1742. It was the site of several speeches by Samuel Adams, James Otis, and others encouraging independence from Great Britain, and is now part of Boston National Historical Park and a well known stop on the Freedom Trail.

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    On The Freedom Trail - Historic Faneuil Hall

    by Mikebb Updated Jun 9, 2008

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    After having a very nice seafood lunch in the Quincy Market we walked across the open space to the historic Faneuill Hall which has also been known as "The Cradle of Liberty". Built in 1742 as a gift to the city from a prominent merchant, the hall bears his name.

    Known over the years as the place for public speaking it is now part of the the market area with stalls selling all sorts of touristy merchandise, some snack foods etc. Well worth the visit to enjoy this historic place which has been renovated to its original best.

    Faneuil Hall Plaque - Faneuil Hall
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  • Jefie's Profile Photo

    A good place to kick off the evening!

    by Jefie Updated May 31, 2008

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    Having just returned from England, my first reaction when I saw Quincy Market was "cool, I'm back in Covent Garden" - with an American twist of course! Thanks to restoration efforts that were undertaken in the 1970s, Quincy Market and Faneuil Hall have both become tourist must-sees. While Faneuil Hall is home to a tourist information office, a post office and plenty of souvenir shops, Quincy Market offers a wide variety of boutiques (Victoria's Secret, Urban Outfitters, Nine West...) as well as many pubs and restaurants, including the new and bigger "Cheers!". If you're traveling on a budget, you'll be happy to know that there's a food court inside the Quincy Market where you can get a decent meal for just a few bucks. With plenty of street performers, tourists and locals around, there's always a fun atmosphere so it's definitely worth checking it out!

    Street action around Quincy Market Front entrance of Faneuil Hall The Cradle of Liberty
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    VISIT FANEUIL HALL & QUINCY MARKET

    by Rich62 Written May 27, 2008

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    FANEUIL HALL is where the first protest of the Sugar Act took place, and it is here that the concept of "no taxation without representation" was created.

    The adjacent Quincy Market was added in 1826.

    Today you can eat here, buy souveniers, clothing, accessories and such. There are usually street entertainers as well.

    FANEUIL HALL FANEUIL HALL FANEUIL HALL/QUINCY MARKET QUINCY MARKET QUINCY MARKET
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    Faneuil Hall / Quincy Market

    by diver-x Updated Dec 3, 2007

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    Faneuil Hall / Quincy Market

    The Faneuil Hall / Quincy Market area is a shopper's paradise. Get all of your Boston souvenirs here! The pedestrian shopping area contains four separate buildings filled with unique shops as well as chain stores. Inside the Quincy Market building, you'll find a plethora of ethnic and American foods to satisfy any appetite!

    Street performers can often be found here in warmer months both in front of Faneuil Hall and in front of the Quincy Market building.

    Quincy Market building at Faneuil Hall Marketplace
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