Faneuil Hall - Quincy Market, Boston

3.5 out of 5 stars 87 Reviews

4 S Market St., Boston, MA 02109 617-523-1300

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  • Entrance to the main building
    Entrance to the main building
    by BruceDunning
  • Faneuil Hall, Boston
    Faneuil Hall, Boston
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  • Faneuil Hall, Boston
    Faneuil Hall, Boston
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  • Visit with self reservation

    by CTanner Written Jan 14, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    As with many people who visited Boston, I had to visit this popular area. I believe any person who ever visits boston should stop here, and if you feel the need to eat at one of the shops, do so for lunch and save your appetite for one of Boston's other GREAT dining experiences like Hamersley's Bistro or Legal Seafood. Quincy Market in my opinion has turned into little more than a privately owned fast-food cafeteria/ food-court. There are some okay shops there, but again Gap and the like have begun moving in on the area. Much like Greenwich Village, once someones lease is up and Gap or Ralph Lauren can pay a higher lease rate, the old places move out and the "cookie cutter" consumer market that our country has begun to create, moves in. Stay away from Todd English's place even for lunch, it has his name on it, but if I was him, I wouldnt put my name on it. McCormick and Schmicks is a good idea for lunch (again, they are a chain as well but they are sort of the Morton's Steakhouse of seafood). I still think anyone interested in Boston's heritage needs to visit the area, just don't expect a "classy" or even historic feel to most of the businesses in the area.

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  • Ewingjr98's Profile Photo

    Faneuil Hall

    by Ewingjr98 Updated Dec 3, 2006

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    Built in 1742, Faneuil Hall has long been an integral part of downtown Boston. Originally built along the harbor as a marketplace, the city has slowly grown around Faneuil Hall. Today the first floor hosts many souvenir shops, a cafe, and a post office. The second floor is home to the famous meeting hall where the Sons of Liberty, including Samuel Adams, met to discuss the problems with the British government. In later years, the meeting hall was used by such notable people as Frederick Douglass, Susan B. Anthony, Jefferson Davis, and John F. Kennedy. Upstairs from this remarkable meeting hall is the home of the Ancient and Honorable Artillery Company, which was chartered in 1638 (http://www.ahacsite.org/).

    National Park Service Rangers give tours of the 2nd-floor hall every 30-60 minutes throughout the day. It is well worth waiting to hear their stories.

    Faneuil is pronounced "fan-yoll"

    Inside Fanieul Hall Fanieul Hall from City Hall Clock at the rear of the meeting hall Statues of former mayor James Michael Curley
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    Quincy Market

    by Ewingjr98 Updated Dec 3, 2006

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    Quincy Market is an area that is difficult to categorize. The area is known for its shopping, but the Quincy Market building houses dozens of small take-out restaurants.

    If you are not in the mood for shopping and eating, Faneuil Hall and Quincy Market are historic locations with impressive architectural significance. As the evening approaches, this area also offers various popular bars such as the Ames Plow Company, the Black Rose, and the Purple Shamrock. There is also a comedy club upstairs in the main building, as well as live music in the streets.

    Want to take a romantic walk through the city? This spot also fits the bill as the trees are beautifully lit with white Christmas-style lights. Columbus park and Long Wharf are also just a short stroll away, and make for nice, peaceful evening spots. From the end of Long Wharf, you can sit and watch the airplanes takeoff and land at Logan Airport across Boston Harbor.

    Sound like a local and pronounce it "quinzy mahket"!

    Front of Quincy Market Pastry shop in Quincy Market Sam Adams statues and the Quinct Mkt area at night
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  • bjwong's Profile Photo

    Quincy Market

    by bjwong Written Dec 3, 2006

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    Just like the colonial markets of old - if the colonists sold mango lassis and teriyaki chicken. Even though it's on the tourist trail this eatery serves up food from all corners of the globe and is a good place to stop for lunch if you are in the middle of walking the Freedom Trail.

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    Shopping and Eating

    by johngayton Written Jun 19, 2006

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    The modern day Faneuil Hall manages to be both a tourist attraction and a local Bostonian grab a bite to eat sort of place, ideal for a takeaway lunch down by the harbour or on the grass of Columbus Park, weather permitting obviously. The building itself comprises three floors, the ground floor being the market stalls and food outlets with an incredible diversity of offerings, Chinese, Chowdah or Chorizo, just to name a few Ch’s. I didn’t have a chance this time round to visit the upper floors but the second floor is staffed by the National Park Rangers and the third contains the museum and armory of the Ancient and Honorable Artillery Company of Massachusetts (to give it its full title).

    A lovely quote from Francis Hatch sums the place up:

    “Here orators in ages past
    Have mounted their attacks,
    Undaunted by proximity
    Of sausage on the racks.”

    Faneuil Hall from City Hall
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    Faneuil Hall Marketplace

    by leffe3 Written Apr 26, 2006

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    Pronounced Fan-yool or Fan'l, the main building was erected in 1740 as a market and public meeting place. It's an imposing building and is the core of the newer (1970s) Quincy Market Place. It's a key shopping area of Boston, full of lively public spaces, buskers and street enterainers, chain stores, specialist shops, extensive number of cafes and restaurants.

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    Go Upstairs!

    by cruisingbug Updated Mar 31, 2006

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    Faneuil Hall (site #11 on the Freedom Trail) is one of those Boston places where today's everyday life goes on in the midst of an historic site. Rather than preserving the entire hall, the first floor is still being used for its original purpose, as a shopping center. Take the stairs or elevator up, though, and you'll step back in time as you enter the Great Hall, where the political fires of the American Revolution were lit. A National Park guide is there to explain the history of the hall (15 minute talks on the half hour). If you're starting your walk on the Freedom Trail here, ask for a Park Service map - it's free (unlike the trail map at Boston Common) and has good info.

    The Great Hall is still used by Bostonians for debates and meetings.

    For even more of a history lesson, go up to the fourth floor to see the Armory museum. On the table as you enter are guides to what you're seeing, explaining the paintings on the walls and the various weaponry.

    Faneuil Hall, 2nd Floor, Boston

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  • Tom_Fields's Profile Photo

    The heart of Boston: Fanueil Hall and Quincy Marke

    by Tom_Fields Updated Feb 24, 2006

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    If Boston has an actual center, this is it. Culturally, historically, and economically, this is the heart of the city.

    Constructed in 1742, Fanueil (rhymes with "annual") Hall has served ever since as a shopping center and local meeting place. Here, leaders of the colonial rebellion, such as Samuel Adams and Paul Revere met to discuss the political situation and chart a course of action.

    Quincy Market was built in the early 1800s to accomodate the overflow from the venerable Fanueil Hall. This is more of a typical urban shopping area.

    Haymarket is an outdoor market with stalls selling fresh produce and all kinds of other items. It's next to Quincy Market.

    This remains an excellent place to shop, eat, drink, watch the people, and simply hang out.

    Fanueil Hall Front view of Fanueil Hall Quincy Market on a busy day Quincy Market's crowded food court Nearby Haymarket
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  • aukahkay's Profile Photo

    Quincy Market

    by aukahkay Written Feb 24, 2006

    Quincy Market was built in the 1800s to complement Faneuil Hall as an additional market place. Today, street performers and push-cart stalls line both sides of Quincy Market. The food court is probably the best food court anywhere. You will still find more lobster items here (from candy lobsters to lobster T-shirts to stuffed toy lobsters) than anywhere else in the USA.

    Quincy Market Quincy Market
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  • KarenandCory's Profile Photo

    Quincy Market

    by KarenandCory Written Jan 21, 2006

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    Quincy Market is a historic building located in Faneuil Hall Marketplace. It was built between 1824-1826 and has been used as a shopping market ever since. Today it is full of restaurants and food stalls.

    Quincy Market

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  • jmhenry1123's Profile Photo

    Freedom Trail Landmark

    by jmhenry1123 Written Oct 25, 2005

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    Faneiul Hall and the Quincy Market are key elements on the Freedom Trail. Today the buildings serve as shopping centers and food stalls. The Quincy Market is a good place to stop and grab a bite to eat while walking the freedom trail.

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    View History and Shop at the Same Time

    by KennyB Updated Sep 5, 2005

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    Follow the Freedom Trail to Quincy Market and Faneuil Hall. If you are a history buff there is Faneuil Hall and for those who like shopping there are a number of stores that will exceed your expectations in Quincy Market.

    National Park Service rangers present historical talks every thirty minutes, 9:30am - 4:30pm, except when Hall is in use for special events. (Free.)

    Faneuil Hall has served as a marketplace and a meeting hall since 1742. Funding was provided by a wealthy merchant, Peter Faneuil, for the construction and local artisan to create the grasshopper weather vane that still perches on the building's cupola. Inspiring speeches by Samuel Adams and other patriots were given that eventually led to independence from the British. Faneuil Hall was expanded in 1806 by Charles Bulfinch. When Boston became a city the use of Faneuil Hall as a government meeting place came to an end, but it was still regularly used. Today, the first floor is still used as a lively marketplace and the second floor is a meeting hall where many Boston City debates are held.

    The 170-year-old Quincy Market, located directly behind Faneuil Hall, served as Boston's wholesale food distribution center until the 1960s. Today, the food stalls inside this stately granite building offer culinary delights to thousands of visitors a day, selling everything from calzones to gourmet soup to frozen yogurt. Be sure to visit with an empty stomach, since you'll find a variety of food vendor.

    The Marketplace is a five-minute walk to the New England Aquarium, The Children's Museum, The Old State House, and Paul Revere's House. Other attractions that are between 7-15 minutes away include The New State House, The Museum of Fine Arts, Boston Public Garden, Old North Church, The USS Constitution, and Fenway Park.

    Quincy Market and Faneuil Hall
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    Quincy Market

    by Galahad Updated Jul 10, 2005

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    Quincy Market behind Fanueil Hall and consists of 3 halls or covered markets parallel to one another. Both architecturally, the external layout of the halls and the space between the market halls and Fanueil Hall reminded me of the Covent Garden area in London. Quincy Market is built with Boston Granite which came from around Boston Harbour built about 1825.
    I was particularly impressed with Gallery and dome in the Central Hall.
    There is lots of buzz about the place, lots of street circus skill type entertainment aimed at both families and adults. My photograph is of the central hall and the plaza in front of it.

    Quincy Market 27.5.05
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    Faneuil Hall

    by Galahad Written Jul 8, 2005

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    Faneuil Hall serves 2 functions. In the basement and ground floor are shops which I thought were of a good standard selling quality souvenirs, Many of the items referred to the Independance from the British Crown and the early constitution. An interesting view if you are a Brit !!! Upstairs, on what we Brits call the First Floor is a meeting hall in which many of the original 18th Century anti-British Meetings were held.

    Faneuil Hall 27.5.05
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    food and shopping

    by shohman Written Jun 20, 2005

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    Quincy Market has been the center of shopping since the late 1700's. It now is full of restaurants and specialty shops for everyone. Everyone who visits Boston should stop here for the food, history and people watching.

    Quincy Market

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