Faneuil Hall - Quincy Market, Boston

3.5 out of 5 stars 81 Reviews

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  • Entrance to the main building
    Entrance to the main building
    by BruceDunning
  • Faneuil Hall, Boston
    Faneuil Hall, Boston
    by antistar
  • Faneuil Hall, Boston
    Faneuil Hall, Boston
    by antistar
  • Faneuil Hall Marketplace - Meeting Place

    by LrSorr Updated Mar 24, 2007

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    The Man behind the famous New England beer
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    Your trip to Boston is not complete without stopping here. This place is packed with shoppers, sightseers, diners, etc. This is definitely a meeting place for everyone. One of the best landmarks in Boston area. The area sits on cobblestone promenade where you can also find "entertainers" -- bands, clowns, mimes... they all make the area more lively.

    Quick tips:

    1) North Market and South Market -- offers good sit-down meals and drinks. You will also find various stores from clothing to accessories. Very expensive.

    2) Quincy Market -- fast food-ready-to-go-meals. Plenty of choices. This is a three story building. First floor is all food court, Second floor is a bar. Restrooms can be found in the ground floor.

    3) Faneuil Hall -- rather small. It's a place to buy souveneirs. In the corner is the Information booth where visitors can pick up brochures. Hardly I ever find a personel there answering questions.

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    Fanueil Hall

    by Krumlovgirl Written Jun 1, 2005

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    There is always something going on at Faneuil Hall and it is always crowded. That is the conclusion that I have reached. While it IS touristy and the shops are pretty much those of what you could find in any mall, it is still definitely worth visiting. You should really visit Quincy Market on an empty stomach because it is impossible to sniff all the mouthwatering smells without wanting to taste a little bit of everything. When I was in there last, it was a madhouse. The ice cream stand had a line that looked like it would take 30 minutes tog et through. You can find any kind of food you want, from hamburgers to Indian and Thai. You can take your food outside and people watch from a bench or you can try to find a table in the atrium which isn’t likely. Around Quincy is a pedestrian mall where artists, magicians, and other local entertainers set up shop and entertain. It can be a zoo, but it’s all in good fun. There are also carriage rides available. Another good area to visit is the farmer’s market. At the end of the day they start getting rid of everything and you can get some real bargains.

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  • moiraistyx's Profile Photo

    FANEUIL HALL/QUINCY MARKET

    by moiraistyx Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    FANEUIL HALL

    In 1742, Peter Faneuil, Boston’s wealthiest merchant at the time, had Fanueil Hall built as a gift to the city. The edifice was home to merchants of all types and fishermen. It is best known as being a platform for the country's most famous speakers. The Sugar Act in 1764 was first protested here by the colonists and the doctrine of "no taxation without representation" was established here. Here George Washington toasted the nation on its first birthday. Over the last two and a half centuries Faneuil Hall has played host to many famous speakers including Oliver Wendall Holmes, Susan B. Anthony, Bill Clinton and Ted Kennedy. Fanueil Hall has been nicknamed "The Cradle of Liberty."

    Faneuil Hall was expanded in 1826 to accomodate it's growing clientel and merchants. This is when Quincy Market was added. Quincy Marcket is named for former Boston mayor Josiah Quincy. By the mid-1900's, the buildings of Fanueil Hall and Quincy Marcket had fallen into great disrepair and many stood empty. The vision of Jim Rouse, Benjamin Thompson and Mayor Kevin White, brought these broken down buildings from dilapidated structures to what it is today. This renovation forever changed the look of downtown Boston.

    Today Fanueil Hall and Quincy Market attract more than 18 million visitors annually. Dozens of shops, carts and kiosks make up this wonderful shopping district in downtown Boston. As a college freshman, this was where I went to shop for a dress to wear on my first date with Robert. I also performed my first Kareoke number with my friend Beth here in 1992. This is also the place responsible for all my college credit card debt. Hard core shoppers will find it difficult not to spend a bundle of cash in the varying shops. As a side note, located somewher amogst the shops used to be the best chocolate shop I've ever been to. If it's still there, try the chocolate covered raspberries, they are divine.

    Hours of operation: Monday through Saturday from 10am to 9pm, Sunday from noon to 6pm.
    Restaurants have extended hours.

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  • Jefie's Profile Photo

    A good place to kick off the evening!

    by Jefie Updated May 31, 2008

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    Street action around Quincy Market
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    Having just returned from England, my first reaction when I saw Quincy Market was "cool, I'm back in Covent Garden" - with an American twist of course! Thanks to restoration efforts that were undertaken in the 1970s, Quincy Market and Faneuil Hall have both become tourist must-sees. While Faneuil Hall is home to a tourist information office, a post office and plenty of souvenir shops, Quincy Market offers a wide variety of boutiques (Victoria's Secret, Urban Outfitters, Nine West...) as well as many pubs and restaurants, including the new and bigger "Cheers!". If you're traveling on a budget, you'll be happy to know that there's a food court inside the Quincy Market where you can get a decent meal for just a few bucks. With plenty of street performers, tourists and locals around, there's always a fun atmosphere so it's definitely worth checking it out!

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  • cjg1's Profile Photo

    Check Out Quincy Market

    by cjg1 Updated Jan 20, 2010

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    Me in front of Quincy Market
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    Quincy Market is a three-level Greek revival-style building. Quincy Market is a hub of activity with locals and tourist visiting daily for shopping and a bite to eat. The central corricdor of the Market is a large food court with every type of food imagianble from seafood, Greek, Italian, Indian, deserts and ice cream. There are small vendors selling local items and crafts as well as typical chain stores and shops.

    My wife and I enjoy wandering the Market and seeing the sights. The food court is always jam packed and the smell of food gets your tummy rumbling. We spent some type shopping and browsing through stores; which is always a favorite activity of ours. Yes, this is a big "tourist" spot but sometimes it's fun to be a "tourist".

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    Historical Faneuil Hall

    by cjg1 Updated Jan 20, 2010

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    Faneuil Hall has been a marketplace and a meeting ceneter since 1742. Several famous people such as Samuel Adams and James Otis gave sppeches to rally support for Indepence from Britain. Fanueil Hall is part of the Freedom Trail in Boston and is a Historic site. Faneuil Hall is named for Peter Faneuil a wealthy merchant who provided the funds for the construction.

    The building itself is impressive with a large cuppola and a grasshopper weather vane.

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  • mikey_e's Profile Photo

    The less revolutionary hall

    by mikey_e Written Apr 15, 2009

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    Quincy Market
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    Quincy Market is not an extension of Faneuil Hall; but the proximity of the two buildings makes visiting the two of them at the same time easy, and makes the choice of deciding what to eat infinitely more difficult. This structure was constructed in the 1820s, in response to the rapid growth of the city of Boston and the need for more commercial space. Part of the harbor was filled in and Quincy Hall, designed by Alexander Parris, was erected on the site. I suppose it could be called an eclectic style building, since the façade features Doric columns but the rest of the building is not entirely in a neo-Classical style. The interior of the market is quite interesting too, with its copula lined with dark wood. Today this is exclusively a food market and you can get all types of Boston specialties here. There are glass annexes that were added in the 1970s, so the building new has one of those hybrid old-new styles. My suggestion is to eat under the copula and the wooden beams.

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  • johngayton's Profile Photo

    Shopping and Eating

    by johngayton Written Jun 19, 2006

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    Faneuil Hall from City Hall

    The modern day Faneuil Hall manages to be both a tourist attraction and a local Bostonian grab a bite to eat sort of place, ideal for a takeaway lunch down by the harbour or on the grass of Columbus Park, weather permitting obviously. The building itself comprises three floors, the ground floor being the market stalls and food outlets with an incredible diversity of offerings, Chinese, Chowdah or Chorizo, just to name a few Ch’s. I didn’t have a chance this time round to visit the upper floors but the second floor is staffed by the National Park Rangers and the third contains the museum and armory of the Ancient and Honorable Artillery Company of Massachusetts (to give it its full title).

    A lovely quote from Francis Hatch sums the place up:

    “Here orators in ages past
    Have mounted their attacks,
    Undaunted by proximity
    Of sausage on the racks.”

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  • lovemycacti's Profile Photo

    Faneuil Hall & Markets

    by lovemycacti Written Apr 11, 2004

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Marketplace

    It's a little hard to describe Faneuil Hall and the marketplaces. This area is best described as a layout of the letter E. The straight supporting line that connects the bars could be described as Faneuil Hall.

    Faneuil Hall (pronounced like you are saying the word "annual" with the letter "F" in front) began in 1764 as the "Cradle of Liberty", Sam Adams and the Sons of Liberty rallied colonists to assert their independance during the American Revolution. Today, the Faneuil Hall building mainly hosts Boston tourism merchandise, such as keychains and tshirts and other gifts.

    The South and North Markets are the top and bottom lines of the letter E. There you will find upper-scale shops as Victoria's Secret, Origins, Nine West, Crabtree & Evelyn and more.

    Quincy Market however, the middle line of the letter E, is truly what all the commotion is about - food. And then more food. As well as unique little gifts and did I mention the food? With more than 40 restaurants and snack parlours inside it can be easily frustrating to try and decide what to eat. From Bubble Tea - to Boston Chowda, from Italian, to Mexican, to Bombay cuisine and Philedelphia steak and hoagies - its all here.

    Craving a warm jalapeno pretzel? We got it here and then finished up with a chocolate chip cookie the size of our head. What a great, plentiful marketplace.

    Be sure to check their website or call for concerts, art fesitvals and special events that frequently take place here. This is Boston! No admissions, this is a shopping center.

    Retail Stores: Mon-Sat 10am-9pm,
    Sun 12pm-6pm

    Quincy Market Foods opens early every day and the pubs are open late every evening.
    Best parking option is 75 State Street or under the Boston Common.

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  • BruceDunning's Profile Photo

    The Shops are Endless

    by BruceDunning Updated Oct 17, 2008

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    north market
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    This scene is not for me, but many-hundreds or thousands come here continually to shop. There are about 200 shops in the three Quincy buildings and then 38 carts outside. You can choose from 16 restaurants or 35 other eating places in the buildings. FAst food to casual. They have Quincy market in the middle and then long buildings called south and north markets bookending that. I am thankful it was not the middle of summer with MAny people and it is hot and muggy. Fall was enough of a gauntlet.

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  • Pawtuxet's Profile Photo

    Faneuil Hall

    by Pawtuxet Updated Mar 11, 2012

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    There is usually something going on around Faneuil Hall. Walking through the old building...there are numerous vendors on either side of the broad walkway. Each is selling a different kind of food, candy, ice cream, coffee...You can pick up lunch and find a seat in the center area...watching the hundreds of people who pass through each day.
    Outside you find park benches..shopping, nearby restaurants...but best of all are the street entertainers. Jugglers, mimes, all sorts of performers amuse the passerby. Always an active spot just across from the Government Center and a short walk to the Old State House.
    TAKE A TOUR OF BOSTON'S FANEUIL HALL ON THEIR WONDERFUL ACTIVE WEB SITE ~
    FANEUIL HALL

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  • Tijavi's Profile Photo

    Serving its original purpose

    by Tijavi Updated Feb 13, 2010

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    Sam Adams' statue in front of Faneuil Hall
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    Lovingly known as "Cradle of Liberty," for being the venue of Samuel Adams' impassioned speeches on independence from their British colonial rulers, Faneuil Hall retains its original purpose as focal point of civic life and open debate in Boston. At the time of my visit, the hall was filled with supporters from two candidates for mayor of Boston during a town hall meeting. With the two camps trying their best to outdo the other party with catchy slogans, it was an interesting display of democracy.

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    Place to Wander and Relax

    by BruceDunning Updated Oct 16, 2008

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    Adams Protects the square
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    It was first build over 1740-42. A fire in 1761 burned most of it and again rebuilt in 1862 Charles Bulfinch expanded it, nearly doubling the size. It was rebuilt in 1898 to support he structural soundness. A refurbishment was done in 1979 and totally reworked in 1997. Upstairs the grand hall is intact. Downstairs there are shops, just like in the old days to sell goods.

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  • BruceDunning's Profile Photo

    The Hall for the People

    by BruceDunning Written Oct 17, 2008

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    Brochure of the hall
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    Peter Faneuil became wealthy from merchant shipping of goods. He wanted to build a market hall for the community and in 1742 that was completed. It burned in the interior in 1761 and took two years to rebuild. Then in 1805 they wanted to expand and solicited Charles Bulfinch, well known architect for the region. He doubled the size of the building without diminishing its style. The hall was used through 1822 at which time they city converted to a council rather than town hall forum. It continued as a meeting hall for issues in the mid 1800's.
    Now besides the preserved hall upstairs, the downstairs is a shopping area for trinkets and gifts.

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  • BruceDunning's Profile Photo

    The interior has the history

    by BruceDunning Written Oct 17, 2008

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    Arial of the building
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    The desire of Peter Fanueil was to build a market and hall for the community. He did that in 1742 and in spite of burning in 1761, it was expanded in 1805 to double. Now the hall upstairs is the meeting place ( from the old days) and down is the shops to gifts and candies.

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