Fenway Park, Boston

4.5 out of 5 stars 4.5 Stars - 48 Reviews

Been here? Rate It!

hide
  • Inside Fenway
    Inside Fenway
    by PupDawg
  • Fenway Park
    by fdrich29
  • Going up Yawkee Way
    Going up Yawkee Way
    by PupDawg
  • PupDawg's Profile Photo

    America's most beloved Ballpark

    by PupDawg Written Jan 16, 2012

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Inside Fenway
    4 more images

    If you are interested in the history but not seeing a game, a trip down Yawkee Way is still great fun. There are reasonably priced tours available inside the ballpark as well. If you go when there is no game then you can walk around the outside of the park, and parking is available in local garages.

    Was this review helpful?

  • Miles07's Profile Photo

    Tour and a Game

    by Miles07 Written Jul 8, 2009

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    view from press box
    1 more image

    There are two ways to experience Fenway Park, one of Boston's most recognizable landmarks. The 1st is that you can take a guided tour of the park for $12. This was a lot of fun. While learning the history and traditions of the park you are taken onto the green monster, and even into the press boxes. To take a tour, buy a ticket at the box office. Tours are run by the hour. The next great way to experience Fenway Park is to go to a Red Sox game. Tickets are usually sold out, but if you're willing to pay a considerable extra amount, you wont be disappointed. The vibe of the place is amazing. Tickets can be found online or you can scalp them (i walked by close to 20 different scalpers). Spending part of your day at Fenway Park is a unique Boston experience.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Luxury Travel
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • fdrich29's Profile Photo

    Fenway Seating: Dugout and Extended Dugout Box

    by fdrich29 Written Jun 2, 2009
    Dugout Box (Infield)
    4 more images

    The seats closest to the on-field action at Fenway Park are the Infield Dugout Field Boxes and Extended Dugout Field Boxes. From best I can tell (using my pictues and the Seating Chart on Redsox.com) the Dugout Boxes are the first 9 rows of seats in the park. Infield Dugout seats cover the sections between the dugouts and run $325. The Left Field Extended Dugout runs from the Visitor's dugout to the Left Field Foul line. The Right Field Extended Dugout runs from the Red Sox dugout to the Right Field Box seats. Extended Dugout seats are $270.

    Related to:
    • Road Trip
    • Family Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • fdrich29's Profile Photo

    Fenway Park Seating-Home Plate Pavilion

    by fdrich29 Written Jun 2, 2009
    4 more images

    The section of the Pavilion located behind home plate is called the State Street Home Plate Pavilion. Perhaps second only to the Green Monster, this part of the Park is most iconic. Located below the press box (the upper section behind home plate that is still behind glass, below the Fenway Park sign) and above the EMC Club seats, these tickets go for $215 a piece and are only sold via season tickets (2009 has long since sold out). This section has all the comforts and perks of the State Street Pavilion, but with a better view and higher price tag.

    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Road Trip

    Was this review helpful?

  • fdrich29's Profile Photo

    Fenway Park Seating-Bleachers

    by fdrich29 Written Jun 2, 2009
    4 more images

    I've been to many games at Fenway Park since my first in 1986, and more often than not I've sat in the bleachers. You're far from the action on the field, but the atmosphere where the "Bleacher Creatures" dwell is something very special. To never have sat in the Bleachers in Fenway is to never have truly experienced the Park and it's full glory. Seats cost $26 (although after fees and surcharges it will cost you almost double that). The Upper Bleacher section seats are just $12. Sections 35-38 of the Bleachers are in center field with a good view of the first-base line. Here is where the "Wave" tends to begin it's course around the Park. Sections 39-43 are located behind the bullpens in right-field, which is where many of the left-handed hitters send their home runs.

    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Road Trip

    Was this review helpful?

  • fdrich29's Profile Photo

    Red Sox vs. Toronto Blue Jays 5/21/2009

    by fdrich29 Updated Jun 2, 2009
    Bay knocked this pitch into the Red Sox bull pen
    4 more images

    All of my Fenway Park pages were created after I attended the Red Sox vs. Blue Jays game on May 21, 2009. I took most of the pictures of the interior of Fenway Park from my seat in the bleachers with my Olympus SP-565UZ camera. I had not been to a Red Sox game at Fenway in many years and wanted to capture as much of the experience as possible. The Sox beat the Blue Jays 5-1. All prices and ticket information that I have included are based on the 2009 rates.

    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Road Trip

    Was this review helpful?

  • fdrich29's Profile Photo

    Fenway Seating-Right Field Terrace

    by fdrich29 Written Jun 2, 2009
    2 more images

    Another new seating area for 2009. This section replaced the Right Field Roof Box Seats and the waste-of-space referred to as "Conigliaro's Corner" Seats in the Terrace are $50 with Standing Room Only going for $30. The Right Field Terrace section has private concessions and rest rooms.

    Related to:
    • Road Trip
    • Family Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • fdrich29's Profile Photo

    Fenway Park Seating:Budweiser Rgt Field Roof Deck

    by fdrich29 Updated Jun 2, 2009
    1 more image

    Watch the game from above the retired numbers of the Red Sox greats! The Budweiser Right Field Roof Deck features approximately 55 tables in three rows and offers a spectacular view of the game. Tickets in this section run $115, $30 for standing room only. The face value for a table of four seats is $460 and comes with a $100 food and beverage voucher. Like other premium seats in Fenway, the only way to get these tickets are through a random lottery. The section features a full bar, wait service and private rest rooms.

    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Road Trip

    Was this review helpful?

  • fdrich29's Profile Photo

    Fenway Park Seating-Green Monster Seats

    by fdrich29 Written Jun 2, 2009
    4 more images

    Quite possibly the most highly coveted tickets in Sportsdom, Fenway Park's 200 Green Monster Seats became the stuff of legends as soon as they were constructed during the 2002-3 off season. Seats go on sale via an on-line lottery system before each season and sell out immediately. Tickets, if you can get them, run $160 a piece. Entry for the Monster Seats is via Gate E on Landsdowne Street. There is a concession stand on the Monster for patrons' convenience.

    Related to:
    • Road Trip
    • Family Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • fdrich29's Profile Photo

    Fenway Park Seating-Coca Cola Corner

    by fdrich29 Updated Jun 2, 2009
    4 more images

    The Coca Cola Corner, the 412 seats in the upper level of Fenway Park, where the left field foul pole meets the Green Monster, were unveiled in March of 2008. Seats for this "family friendly" section run $75, standing room in this section are $25. Seats can be purchased for single games and 20-game packages. This section replaced the luxury boxes (seating capacity:120) that were built for the 1999 All-Star Game that was held at Fenway. A 42 foot long, 12 foot high Coca Cola sign with over 1,000 lights sits proudly above this section. The Coca Cola bottles that formerly adorned the lights at Fenway have since been removed, restoring Fenway's appearance to what it once was. The new sign is reportedly reminiscent of a Coca Cola sign that once could been seen on Boston's Storrow Drive. Coca Cola has been a sponsor of the Boston Red Sox since 1912.

    Related to:
    • Road Trip
    • Family Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • fdrich29's Profile Photo

    Fenway Park Seating-EMC Club

    by fdrich29 Written Jun 2, 2009
    4 more images

    When the powers-that-be of the Red Sox organization removed the glass covering the .406 and Red Sox Hall of Fame sections of Fenway Park in 2006 they created the EMC Club on level three and the State Street Pavilion on level four in their places. Membership to this exclusive part of the club is not easy to come by, seats are listed on Redsox.com for $297 a piece and membership is sold out for the 2009 season. Membership in the EMC Club includes: private entrance to the park via the Absolute Clubhouse, dedicated concierge, coat/bag check service, complimentary program and game notes, in-seat food and beverage service, in-seat souvenir delivery, scoreboard messages, discounts from the team store, and more. The EMC Club opens two hours before the game and close one hour after the final out. Reservations are recommended, but not required for dining at the EMC Club (again, you need to be a member to dine here). EMC Club boasts three full service bars and 5 star dining. Watch the game in a climate controlled environment and padded seats. It's said the view from these seats is unrivaled, sadly I most likely will never know for myself.

    Related to:
    • Road Trip
    • Family Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • fdrich29's Profile Photo

    Fenway Park Seating-State Street Pavilion

    by fdrich29 Updated Jun 2, 2009
    3 more images

    I should start off saying if you don't already have season tickets to the State Street Pavilion you probably won't be sitting there, unless you know someone with seats. Tickets for the 2,224 seats in this section are listed at $160 per seat, but are available only via season tickets, and the website says seats for 2009 have already sold out. The State Street Pavilion, which along with the EMC Club, replaced the .406 and Red Sox Hall of Fame Clubs in 2006, is an exclusive area of Fenway, complete with it's own private entrance, two full, private bars, climate control, flat screen TV's, in-seat wait service and padded seats with cup holders. The Pavilion is located on the fourth level of Fenway Park, behind home plate and extending down both baselines. It's recommended if you plan on eating at any of the private lounges in the Pavilion (again, you must have a ticket to the area for entry) arrive at least an hour before game time. The Pavilion opens two hours before the start of a game, and closes one hour afterward. There is a dress code to enter the Pavilion, according to Redsox.com "Casual business attire is recommended. Gentlemen must wear neat and clean dress slacks, khaki pants, dress jeans or shorts, neat and clean sleeved shirts, shoes, sneakers or sandals. Women must wear neat and clean dress skirts, dresses, slacks, shorts, dress jeans, tops, shoes, sneakers or sandals." Dining opens include A La Carte salads, apps and sandwiches (including lobster rolls), brick oven pizza and calzones, and all you can eat buffet, which starts two hours before game time until the end of the 3rd inning. In-seat dining includes typical Park fare, but also unexpected treats like clam chowder, hummus with pretzel crisps and buffalo chicken bites. Members of the Pavilion also receive discounts on souvenirs.

    Related to:
    • Road Trip
    • Family Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • fdrich29's Profile Photo

    Fenway Park-Ted Williams Statue

    by fdrich29 Updated Jun 1, 2009
    4 more images

    Located outside of Fenway Park's right field, by Gate B, sits the 8'6", 3,380 pound statue of the Red Sox's ultimate hero and the last major leaguer to hit over .400, Ted Williams. Williams, who made visiting children battling cancer at the Jimmy Fund Clinic at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute part of his routine, is captured with his bat over his left shoulder while placing his cap on the head of a child, who has a bald head, due to his cancer treatment. This deeply moving tribute was originally proposed by Boston Mayor Thomas Menino after William's death on July 5, 2002 and was unveiled to the public on April 16, 2004. In attendance for the event in addition to Mayor Menino were William's teammates Johnny Peskey, Bobby Doerr, Ted Lepcio and Frank Malzone, Red Sox owner's John Henry and Larry Lucchino, the sculpor, Franc Talarico and benefactor A. Hank Evanish.

    Related to:
    • Road Trip
    • Family Travel
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • fdrich29's Profile Photo

    Fenway Park-Gates

    by fdrich29 Updated Jun 1, 2009
    Banners on Landsdowne mark gates C & E
    4 more images

    So you've braved the Green Line and possibly other Boston MBTA routes, or driving from miles only to pay ridiculously high parking rates. You have your banners, Sox hats, camera, and the excitement of catching a game at Fenway, but now, how do you enter the park? There are five gates that allow entry to Fenway, A-E. Gate A, the main gate, is located on the corner of Yawkey Way and Brookline Ave. This is the closest gate to the Red Sox Offices. Walking down Brookline Ave. we come to Gate E, at the corner of Brookline and Landsdowne. Further down Landsdowne, across from the House Of Blues is Gate C. Going around the corner on Ipswich Street to the corner of Van Ness is Gate B. Here you have the names of players who's numbers have been retired. Gate D is located where Van Ness meets Yawkey Way, which is closed to travelers on game day and considered part of Fenway Park, so a ticket is needed to enter the street. You can also enter Yawkey Way through Gate A. All gates open 2 hours prior to the start of a game. Your ticket will alert you to which gate is easiest access to your seats. For handicap accessibility, Redsox.com says "All gates around Fenway Park are handicap-accessible. Gate D has three elevators and Gates B and E have one elevator each available to fans who require them. Grandstand wheelchair ticket holders should enter through Gates D or E."

    Related to:
    • Road Trip
    • Family Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • fdrich29's Profile Photo

    Fenway Park- Green Monster

    by fdrich29 Updated Jun 1, 2009
    4 more images

    37 feet, 2 inches high. 9000 Square feet. 305 (ish) feet from home plate. This is Fenway Park's Green Monster. Robbing hitters of home runs since the park was built, the Monster is the highest wall in Major League Baseball. The Monster was not actually green until 1947, prior to that it was covered in advertisements. The Monster was originally made of wood, and then covered in tin and concrete in 1934. after a fire had destroyed much of the Park on January 5, 1934 . Since 1976 the Monster has been made of hard plastic. The scoreboard is still manual, someone has to update the game and scores from around the majors. Former owners Thomas A. Yawkey and Jean R. Yawkey have their initials running along the side of the scoreboard in morse code. After the 2002-3 season seats were added to the top of the Monster. Dubbed "Monster Seats", they can accomodate 274 fans (not including a smaller section that was added in 2005. Seats are sold via a lottery system prior to the start of the season and currently cost $160. Standing room atop the Monster cost $30.

    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Road Trip

    Was this review helpful?

Instant Answers: Boston

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

116 travelers online now

Comments

Hotels Near Fenway Park
3.5 out of 5 stars
521 Opinions
0.2 miles away
Show Prices
5.0 out of 5 stars
2335 Opinions
0.2 miles away
Show Prices
3.5 out of 5 stars
813 Opinions
0.6 miles away
Show Prices

View all Boston hotels