Freedom Trail, Boston

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    Copp's Hill
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    Copp's Hill Burial Ground, Boston
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  • machomikemd's Profile Photo

    Red Line to History

    by machomikemd Written Jul 7, 2014
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    the freedom trail is the historic 2.5 mile (4 kilometers) long red colored foot path to the various historical sites along boston of which many of these sites you can see from a boston trolley tour if you don't want to walk the whole thing. besides the painted red lines along the historical sites, there are ground markers explaining events, graveyards, notable churches and other buildings along the trail like boston commons, old state church, USS Constitution, fanneuil hall and more. some are paid attractions like the Old South Meeting House, Old State House, and Paul Revere House.

    the landmarks and attractions along the freedom trail include: ( I will have tips on some of them)

    1.Boston Common
    2.Massachusetts State House
    3.Park Street Church
    4.Granary Burying Ground
    5.King's Chapel
    6.King's Chapel Burying Ground
    7.Benjamin Franklin statue and former site of the first public school, Boston Latin School
    8.Old Corner Bookstore
    9.Old South Meeting House
    10.Old State House
    11.Site of the Boston Massacre
    12.Faneuil Hall
    13.Paul Revere House
    14.Old North Church
    15.Copp's Hill Burying Ground
    16.Bunker Hill Monument
    17.USS Constitution

    according to wikipedia:

    The trail was originally conceived by local journalist William Schofield, who since 1951 had promoted the idea of a pedestrian trail to link together important local landmarks. John Hynes, the mayor of Boston, decided to put Schofield's idea into action. By 1953, 40,000 people annually were enjoying the sites and history on the Freedom Trail.[3]

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    • Architecture
    • Hiking and Walking

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  • antistar's Profile Photo

    Freedom Trail

    by antistar Updated Jan 30, 2014

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Old South Meeting House, Boston
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    Follow the red brick line!

    The Freedom Trail is the most helpful tourist guide I've experienced in any city anywhere in the world. More cities need to copy this idea. Basically you can see pretty much all of Boston's historic sights by following a red brick line built into the pavement. In fact it's so easy you can forget to even navigate for yourself. I joked that if some clown had painted a red line that diverted off into the harbour, I'd probably follow it into the drink.

    It's a fairly comprehensive tour of the city, although you'll want to do a bit of research to see more. I ended up missing a few sights I'd like to have seen because I thought I'd covered everything. Personally I'd recommend doing something like this for a day in Boston:

    *Go to Charles Street on Beacon Hill for breakfast.
    *Explore the Public Garden.
    *Go back up to Beacon Hill to explore the narrow streets and the square.
    *Wander back down to Boston Common.
    *Meander to the start of the trail at the visitor information centre near Park Street Station.
    *Start following the Freedom Trail
    *Pause for an Italian lunch in North End.
    *Finish the trail at the USS Constitution
    *Take the water shuttle back to Boston and enjoy the city harbour view.
    *Walk down New Atlantic Avenue towards South Station.
    *Turn onto Congress Street Bridge to see the Boston Tea Party museum.
    *Finish your journey at South Station
    *Take the metro back to your hotel.

    You'll see a lot of people in costume guiding tour groups around the city. My favourite, and I wished I'd taken a picture of this, was seeing a British Red Coat drinking alone in an Irish Bar in Boston. It's hard to think of a sight more lonely.

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  • Gypsystravels's Profile Photo

    Follow the Red Bricks

    by Gypsystravels Updated Jan 23, 2013

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    The Freedom Trail is an excellent way to introduce yourself to Colonial Revolutionary Boston. In about 2 to 3 hours the Trail will take you along 16 historical sites. It covers well over two and a half centuries of what is considered "America's most significant past".

    The sites are followed along a brick or painted line which serves as the guide connecting the sites along the route. Along the Trail you will encounter many other interesting and significant sites.

    Following is a list of the sites along the Freedom Trail:

    Freedom Trail
    Boston Common
    Massachusettes State House
    Park Sreet Church & Granary Burying Ground
    Kigns Chapel & Chapel Burying Ground
    First Public School Site & Ben Franklin Statue
    Former Site of the Old Corner Bookstore
    Old South Meeting House
    Old State House
    Boston Massacre Site
    Faneuil Hall
    Paul Revere House
    Old North Church
    Copp Hill Burying Ground
    USS Constitution & Charleston Navy Yard
    Bunker Hill Monument

    You can meander yourself around the Freedom Trail at your own pace or sign up for a Guided Tour. For more information check out their website where you'll find locations and times of where you can start your guided tour.

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  • ViajesdelMundo's Profile Photo

    Don't Miss this Walking Tour

    by ViajesdelMundo Updated Sep 16, 2012

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    You can take as long or be as quick as you like along the FREEDOM TRAIL; it is 2-1/2 miles of brick lined route, which meanders through the downtown of Boston, so you can always stop for food, browse other places, see the historical places in depth, or just pass by. Come back another day and do some more!!

    Signs along the Trail identify each of the 16 stops, which include Bunker Hill and Boston Common.

    Your hotel can provide information or, there are a number of good websites, in addition to the one below, there is: http://gonewengland.about.com/cs/bostonattractions/a/aafreedomtrail.htm
    which has a lot of information too.

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  • PinkFloydActuary's Profile Photo

    Walking the Freedom Trail

    by PinkFloydActuary Written Aug 20, 2011

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    Old North Church
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    If you have any interest at all in history, Boston has a great activity in the Freedom Trail. Follow the red brick road to see a number of important sites in the development of this nation.

    I started off at the north end, parking near the USS Constitution. Due to the high security measures, I decided to forgo that, and went instead up to the Bunker Hill Monument. This was a site of an early battle between the colonial forces and the British, and is today marked by a large stone tower.

    From here, you walk south on the Charlestown Bridge to North End. Next stops include Copp's Hill Burying Ground and Old North Church (one if by land...two if by sea). There were a few Burial grounds along the tour. I found some of the intricate tombstones to be fascinating to look at. You can tour the Old North Church in depth, but the lines can get very long, so I had to take a pass on that.

    The Paul Revere House is privately owned, and can be toured for a small admission fee.

    After a little bit longer of a hike, you hit Faneuil Hall. The hall has served as a marketplace ever since its inception in the 1700's.

    Then it is on to the site of the Boston Massacre and the Old State House - a nifty building that really sticks out as a historical site in the midst of the towering 20th century buildings.

    Later in the tour, you hit the Granary Burying Ground, which is the final resting place to a number of figures - Samuel Adams, Paul Revere, and John Hancock to name a few.

    While there are some modest hills to climb on the rolling streets, this is a pretty nice and easy walk, and start to finish will take a minimum of two hours (I didn't stop for Revere's Home or Old North Church, which would also add to the time.) There are plenty of people around during the day (including numerous tour groups.) With two visitor centers and several restroom stops available, this is the number one attraction that I'm glad I saw in Boston.

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  • american_tourister's Profile Photo

    The Freedom Trail-Walk a mile in their shoes

    by american_tourister Written Jun 26, 2011

    Th freedom trail is this wonderful 2.5 mile walk through most of the major historical sites in Boston that have to do with the American revolution. You start out in Boston Common (A park) and end up at the USS Constitution. It can take you 3 hours or 3 days depending on how much time you spend at each site. If you stop at each location and tour it is at a minimum an all day event. I stopped at most and climbed the Bunker Hill monument as well as visiting the USS Constitution.

    I am a history buff so for me this was a good day out. If you have school aged kids this is better than most educational type forays because you are outside most of the time, walking along the red brick guideway seeing all the places you learned about in school (If you are American that is). You can't get lost if you follow the red bricks!

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    • Family Travel
    • Historical Travel

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  • american_tourister's Profile Photo

    The Freedom Trail-Walk a mile in their shoes

    by american_tourister Updated Jun 26, 2011

    Th freedom trail is this wonderful 2.5 mile walk through most of the major historical sites in Boston that have to do with the American revolution. You start out in Boston Common (A park) and end up at the USS Constitution. It can take you 3 hours or 3 days depending on how much time you spend at each site. If you stop at each location and tour it is at a minimum an all day event. I stopped at most and climbed the Bunker Hill monument as well as visiting the USS Constitution.

    I am a history buff so for me this was a good day out. If you have school aged kids this is better than most educational type forays because you are outside most of the time, walking along the red brick guideway seeing all the places you learned about in school (If you are American that is). You can't get lost if you follow the red bricks!

    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Historical Travel
    • School Holidays

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  • Tracyden's Profile Photo

    Walk the freedom trail

    by Tracyden Written Apr 16, 2011
    spot the red line

    When in Boston - you've got to. If walking isn't your thing then there is a trolley car tour. It must go to all the freedom trail stops as we kept seeing it all day long. The trail did take us all day - but we did go back on ourselves for lunch. Just follow the red line on the pavements through Boston. We walked the trail in snowy February and unfortunately the bunkers hill monument was closed due to health and safety (ice on the steps).

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  • jasperdo's Profile Photo

    Must do tourist thing

    by jasperdo Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Freedom Trail Sign
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    The Freedom Trail is a no-brainer for anyone visiting Boston. Even if you're not into history, walking the Trail is a great introduction to the city of Boston. And if you are a history buff, like I am, it doesn't get much better than this. It's everything you learned in grammer school brought to life: Paul Revere, "One if by land...", the Boston Tea Party, "...the whites of their eyes". Mixed in with the skyscrapers of modern life is a peek into the very birth of America. The Trail is easy to follow...it is either a red line or red bricks that wander the streets of Boston. I broke it into chunks, over 3 days, instead of trying to do the whole thing in one day. However you decide to do it, front ways, backwards, sideways, use that red line as just a general guideline. Be sure and branch off on a side street that catches your eye. In Boston, there's history around every corner, not just along the red line.

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  • PetraG's Profile Photo

    Exploring US history

    by PetraG Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    This three-mile ribbon of red paint links 16 historical sites. Most visitors start the trail at the Boston Common. The National Park Service offers 90-minute guided tours starting at the Boston National Historical Park Visitor Center. Maps are also available here. Stops include the Old State House, Faneuil Hall and the Old North Church. You can also discover Paul Revere's house and the Copp's Hill Burial Ground. At the end of the trail in Charlestown, the Bunker Hill Monument and the U.S.S. Constitution await you.

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    Boston's Old South Meeting House

    by Tom_Fields Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Boston's Old South Meeting House
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    This building was built as a Puritan church in 1729. Benjamin Franklin was baptized here. During the War of Independence, it played a pivotal role.

    On December 16, 1773, a mob an angry colonists met here to protest the British tax on tea. This brought about the famous "Boston tea party", where the Sons of Liberty, disguised as Indians, boarded British merchant vessels in the harbor and dumped hundreds of boxes full of tea into the water.

    During the war, British troops converted the church into a stable. But afterward, it was restored to a house of worship. After an 1872 fire, the church moved. So, in one of our country's first historical preservation efforts, a group of Boston citizens saved it from the wrecking ball. Since 1877, it has been a museum.

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  • shohman's Profile Photo

    Freedom Trail

    by shohman Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Boston is bursting with American history. You cannot walk a mile without hitting a historical sight. The Freedom Trail is a lot of fun and very interesting. A red line painted down the streets of Boston is easy to follow and brings you to sight after sight of historical events. If you are in Boston and weather permits, I'd highly suggest taking the free tour. Without the events featured on this tour, the Country never would have been formed.

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  • RhondaRuth's Profile Photo

    The Freedom Trail

    by RhondaRuth Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    The Old State House

    The Freedom Trail is a 2.5 mile path connecting 16 historic sites that were significant to the American Revolution, including the Old State House, Copp's Hill burial ground, Faneuil Hall, Paul Revere House, King's Chapel, Old North Church, Bunker Hill, Old Ironsides, and more.
    .
    Here's the Old State House which is along the Freedom trail. Today the Old State House is home to the Museum of Boston History. Start your tour here if you like and walk in one direction for the day. Then start back there again the next day and go in the other direction.
    It's something you can do at your own pace and stop and see what you like along the way.

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  • Boston_Eddie_O's Profile Photo

    Freedom Trail Run

    by Boston_Eddie_O Written Jan 20, 2011
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    Freedom Trail Run is a great way to see Boston's historical sites while getting some exercise! It's part concise historical tour, part 5k training run and great for runners of all abilities. Every Saturday & Sunday @ 8:30 am (year-round).

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  • mikey_e's Profile Photo

    Bunker Hill Memorial

    by mikey_e Written Apr 21, 2009

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    Bunker Hill Monument
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    The Bunker Hill Monument is a bit of a misnomer, as it is built on Breed’s Hill (where the Battle of Bunker Hill took place). Bunker Hill is a short distance from Breed’s Hill. This enormous monument marks the spot were British and Rebel forces clashed on June 17, 1775. The Monument is 67 metres tall, and you can climb all 221 steps to the top, from which there are excellent views of Boston, Charlestown and the River. Although the land for the Monument was purchased in 1825, it wasn’t dedicated until 1843 – and the Society that built it nearly went bankrupt because of it. Today there is a small building attached to the monument with a few paintings of Revolutionary figures, while the main museum (opened in 2007) is across the street. Bunker Hill (or rather Breed’s Hill) is allegedly where the phrase “don’t fire till you see the whites of their eyes” was popularized. The accuracy of this popularization is in dispute, but it’s still a fitting end to Freedom Trail, as you get to see the whole of the spectacular city from the top of the Monument once you’ve climbed up.

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