Freedom Trail, Boston

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  • Mikebb's Profile Photo

    The Freedom Trail - History Of Independence

    by Mikebb Updated Jun 7, 2008

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    The Freedom Trail - Notice
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    America was a colony of England and Boston played a most important part in bringing about independence from British rule. This trail incorporates the historic sites from those times of John Adams, Samuel Adams, Crispus Attucks, John Hancock and others including Paul Revere during the years leading up to the Declaration of Independence in 1776.

    The Flag indicates the Freedom Trail and there are painted lines on the footpath for you to follow. Commencing at State House / Boston Common it winds past Park Street Church, The King's Chapel, Old South Meeting House, The Old State House Museum, Paul Revere House, Old North Church, across the Charlestown Bridge to the Inner Harbour and Visitor Centre.

    If you have time and are fit the trail is walkable, the alternative is to take a coach sighteeing tour. We were on a 13 day coach tour and were taken to most locations, however during free time later in the day we revisited some sites including the Old State House Museum.

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    Boston Athenaeum

    by Jefie Updated Jun 1, 2008

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    Boston Athenaeum on Beacon Street

    The Boston Athenaeum is perhaps one of the lesser known spots on the Freedom Trail, but I think it's worth a visit. Founded in 1807, it is one of America's largest membership libraries. Past members have included the likes of Ralph Waldo Emerson, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Daniel Webster and Nathaniel Hawthorne. Today the library holds about 600,000 volumes, and the core of its collection focuses on local history, literature, biographies and fine arts. Members drop by to read, do research or to socialize at the Athenaeum's Wednesday afternoon teas. Visitors are also welcome to drop by and look around the first floor of the building, which generally includes temporary exhibits (don't worry, the staff is very friendly!). Guided tours are offered on Tuesday and Thursday at 3:00 pm, but they must be booked in advance. The Boston Athenaeum is open on weekdays from 9:00 am to 5:30 pm.

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    Irish Famine Memorial

    by Jefie Updated Jun 1, 2008

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    Irish family arriving in Boston...
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    I honestly don't remember being so moved by an urban piece of art. To commemorate the 150th anniversary of the Irish Famine, Boston's Irish community unveiled a memorial park in 1998, featuring a wonderful sculpture by artist Robert Shure. It consists of two life-size sculptures, one depicting a family leaving Ireland's shores, impoverished and desperate, and another depicting a family arriving in Boston, filled with hope and determination. You will come upon the Memorial if you follow the Freedom Trail.

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    Walking through history

    by Jefie Updated May 31, 2008

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    The Old Corner Bookstore, on the Freedom Trail
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    Boston's Freedom Trail is the best and easiest way to see much of what Boston has to offer. This 2.5 mile (4 km) walking trail starts at Boston Common and takes you to the 16 most important historic sights of downtown Boston. You don't need a tour guide and you don't need to do any research - all you have to do is follow the red line painted on the sidewalk. Created in 1958, it's probably the most tourist-friendly feature I've ever encoutered!

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    Walk Through History

    by donforse Written Jan 18, 2008

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    The Freedom Trail is home to several historical landmarks, which can be viewed at your leisure. Following a 2.5 mile red-brick walking trail will lead you to 16 nationally significant historic sites. The Freedom Trail today is a collection of museums, churches, meeting houses, burying grounds, parks, a ship, and historic markers including:

    The Boston Common
    The State House
    Park Street Church
    Granary Burying Ground
    King’s Chapel
    King’ Chapel Burying Ground
    Benjamin Franklin Statue/Boston Latin School
    Old Corner Book Store
    Old South Meeting House
    Old State House
    Site of the Boston Massacre
    Faneuil Hall
    Paul Revere House
    The Old North Church
    Copp's Hill Burying Ground
    USS Constitution — “Old Ironsides”
    Constitution Museum
    Bunker Hill Monument

    Guided tours are available, as well as group and school tours. Also, you can download an audio tour from the Freedom Trail Foundation website ($15). Put it on your I-Pod, and it gives information on every site. Best of all, it gives you the flexibility to take them in at your leisure. Also, self-guide maps are available at the multitude of visitor centers.

    The best place to start is probably the visitor center located in Boston Common (the first stop on the trail), where you can get all information and walking maps.

    All this information, and more, is available on the Freedom Trail Foundations's website (see below).

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    Freedom Trail

    by diver-x Updated Dec 3, 2007

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    The Old State House on the Freedom Trail

    The Freedom Trail starts in the Boston Common and ends up at Charlestown near the USS Constitution and Bunker Hill Monument. You can walk self-guided by following the red line on the sidewalk or take a guided tour courtesy of the National Parks Service. Pictured here is one of the sights you will see, the Old State House, where the Boston Massacre occurred.

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  • Freedom trail, why not?

    by boick Written Nov 12, 2007

    The freedom trail is a good way to see the city, and get in a good chunk of Boston's history. The freedom trail of Boston is a walking route from Boston common to Bunker Hill with many other stops on the way. The freedom trail runs through the old neighborhoods of North Boston and hits most of the major revelutionary war historical sights. I personally haven't done the freedom trail since my fifth grade field, but its defianetly a good way to spend a day in Boston, especially if your just in town for a day or two.

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    Freedom Trail - Put your map away

    by moonfroggy4 Written Oct 27, 2007

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    Gravestone and ivy, Copps Hill Burying Ground
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    Once you find the Freedom Trail (a wide red stripe painted along the tourist path), you can put your guide books and maps away. Simply follow the trail, perhaps crossing the street if you're wary of living out the tourist stereotypes, to hit interesting sites. Boston is a walkable city and many sites are within easy walking distance.

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    Walk the Freedom Trail

    by ibmguy34 Written Jul 17, 2007

    This is a great way to see many of the wonderful historic sights in the city of Boston. Go to the visitors center downtown, next to the State Street MBTA stop and you will be able to get a free map.

    Then head for the Boston Common for the first stop and along the way you will see and learn tons about Boston.

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    First Public School Site

    by Ewingjr98 Updated Jul 8, 2007

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    The ass
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    This location marks the site of America's first public school which was opened in 1635. The school is long gone, but it is marked by a bronze tablet and a sign in the sidewalk. Benjamin Franklin, Sam Adams, and John Hancock all attended the school.

    Today the area is home to the Omni Hotel and the Old City Hall. In front of the Old City Hall, you will see statues of Benjamin Franklin, Josiah Quincy, and a donkey. In front of the donkey, you will see a plaque explaining the origination of the democratic donkey... when Andrew Jackson created the democratic party in 1828, his slogan was "let the people rule"... the media labeled him a jack ass...

    On the ground in front of the ass are two bronze footprints labeled "Stand in opposition."

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    Boston's Freedom Trail

    by sarahandgareth Updated May 15, 2007

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    Following the Freedom Trail

    The Freedom Trail is a 3-mile trail linking 16 historically important sites in Boston - from Boston Common to the Granary Burying Ground to the Old South Meeting House, the Old North Church and eventually Old Ironsides and Bunker Hill.

    It's a fabulous way to see many of the key locations in Boston's - and revolutionary America's - history. There are tales to tell at every location, and the great thing about the Freedom Trail is that it is self-guided (unless you prefer a guided tour).

    You can pick up a pamphlet at the start on Boston Common and decide how long you want to linger at each stop. Perhaps you want to see where John Hancock, Paul Revere and Samuel Adams are buried. Perhaps you want to see where patriots planned the Boston Tea Party. Or maybe you'd like to hear the history of Faneuil Hall, where many a speaker whipped up crowds. Or maybe you want to step aboard the USS Constitution. All of this is on the Freedom Trail - a fabulous way to get an introduction to Boston and several of its neighborhoods.

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    Freedom Trail

    by Emily07 Written Feb 17, 2007

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    Old State House
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    The Freedom Trail is probably one of the best known things to do in Boston. Despite being rather "touristy" it really is a great way to see a lot of the historical sites of the city. Plan on taking a full day to do the entire trail. You'll be walking A LOT! I like to take a coffee break in the North End. It makes for a relaxing break before making the long walk over to Charlestown.

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  • Ewingjr98's Profile Photo

    Freedom Trail - Part 1

    by Ewingjr98 Updated Dec 3, 2006

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    Maps along the Freedom Trail

    If you are new to the city and have only a little time or just want a good intro the Freedom Trail is the place to start. This well-marked red path takes you from the Common to the Battle of Bunker Hill with 14 official stops in between (and several unofficial stops that are part of my tour!).

    The primary stops on the Trail are:
    1. Boston Common - Great place to relax, play catch, feed the squirrels & look at the monuments

    2. Massachusetts State House -- spend some time looking inside

    3. Park Street Church

    4. Granary Burial Ground - Final resting place of the Franklins (except Ben) Sam Adams, Paul Revere, John Hancock, Boston Massacre victims & others

    * unofficial stop -- grab a beer and a sandwich at Beantown Pub

    5. King's Chapel & Burying Ground - Burial place of one of the Pilgrims

    6. First Public School Site - not much here except a design in the sidewalk...more impressive is the Old City Hall with its statues of Ben Franklin and the donkey (be sure to read the story of the Republican elephant vs the Democrat donkey)

    7. Old Corner Bookstore - Was the Boston Globe's souvenir shop...now closed I think

    * Unofficial stop - take a peek at the Irish immigration statues depicting a starving Irish family's transformation from poor and broken to proud Americans

    8. Old South Meeting House - where the Son's of Liberty met before the Boston Tea Party

    9. Old State House -

    10. Boston Massacre Site - located about 15 yards due east of the Old State House...there is a small traffic island at the intersection of Congress Street & Devonshire Street with a circle of stones embedded in the concrete... no other sign marks this spot

    * Unofficial stop - See City Hall and the JFK Federal Building on your way to Faneuil Hall

    11. Faneuil Hall - See the Sam Adams monument, Larry Bird and Bill Rodger's shoes, & Red Auerbach statue. Check out the food at Quincy Market, even if you aren't hungry

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  • bjwong's Profile Photo

    Freedom Trail

    by bjwong Written Dec 3, 2006

    The centerpiece of historical Boston, this series of churches, halls, and marketplaces tell the story of the events leading up to the American Revolution. Highlights along the trail include the starting point, Boston Common, the Old North Church, and Paul Revere's House. THe trail is also littered with the graves of famous revolutionaries including John Hancock, Cotton Mather, and Ben Franklin.

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    Hike the Freedom Trail

    by rafgys Written Oct 31, 2006

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    the red lines shows where to go
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    The Freedom Trail is a red line painted along the main Boston sidewalks... it goes hrough all the major attraction in the downtown area till Charlestown.

    You can take the little bus or hike... I always recomend to hike it. It's almost a two hours walk... but you can stop and chill whenever you feel you're too tired. You get to see more and experience more of what the city and its people are.

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