Freedom Trail, Boston

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  • BruceDunning's Profile Photo

    Walking the path

    by BruceDunning Written Oct 17, 2008

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    The trail is 2 1/2 miles long and can be started at any point. It has red brick, sometimes hard to follow, but the genereal direction is okay.I chose the middle, went to the north end and then back to the south and ending at the State House. They have 16 designated sites along the way.

    Middle of trail at Hanover Street & Congress Hanover & Marshall with shops lined Marshall and Union St by Congress Entry to north end-mall is dead inside Crossing US 93 to the north end
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    Revere was Here

    by BruceDunning Updated Oct 16, 2008

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    Paul Revere was the person who made a reknowned ride to alert the citizens if the British were coming. They in fact were. He rode through the town yelling, apparently they were coming. He was to get to the North church where the signal for the area was to let people know that one light in the bell tower announced they were coming by land and two lights if by sea.
    The real story is that they were coming over the Charles River, not the sea, and REvere was he was on the opposite side of the bank. Other than that, he did ride to Portsmouth to alert them. This ride gave him the entitlement to continue with a well known name, and he became a copper smither, clock manufacturer, and other general trades until he died at 83 years. ell tower announced they were coming by land and two lights if by sea.

    Close up of the belltower View through the trees Church interior Sign of the church Pipe organ in the balcony
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    Map of the Trail Path

    by BruceDunning Updated Oct 16, 2008

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    The trail has 16 sites interspersed through the modern buildings of the city. Some key destination points include Quincy Market, and old set of two buildings that was an open market centuries ago, and today. Also at that location is Fanueil Hall, a meeting hall form inception of the town founding. Then venture to the Italian north end and see Paul REvere house. Coming south, you go by the Old State Capitol, which may be closed for viewing, the Old Meeting house, and over to Boston Commons park and State Capitol.

    Map of the trail sites Names of sites on the map Route Map Map of variety of sites
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    Maps of WAlking area

    by BruceDunning Updated Oct 16, 2008

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    The 16 primary sites on the Freedom Trail map are shown in various colors and style. Below presented is that variety. The trail itself is 2.5 miles, but diversions along the way could make the trek much longer. The red brick path is to direct you, but some can get merged into the other red brick areas. Have a map ready.
    I walked 9 miles each day for two days, and got rather tired but it was worth the effort to see what is important.

    Time distance map between places of interest Freedom Trail map with sites designated View of Freedom trail spots Secondary walking tours
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    Freedom Trail

    by windoweb Written Sep 22, 2008

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    The Freedom Trail is a 2.5 mile red-brick walking trail that leads you to 16 nationally significant historic sites, every one an authentic American treasure. Preserved and dedicated by the citizens of Boston in 1958, when the wrecking ball threatened, the Freedom Trail today is a unique collection of museums, churches, meeting houses, burying grounds, parks, a ship, and historic markers that tell the story of the American Revolution and beyond.

    The Freedom Trail:
    The Boston Common
    The State House
    Park Street Church
    Granary Burying Ground
    King’s Chapel
    King’ Chapel Burying Ground
    Benjamin Franklin Statue/Boston Latin School
    Old Corner Book Store
    Old South Meeting House
    Old State House
    Site of the Boston Massacre
    Faneuil Hall
    Paul Revere House
    The Old North Church
    Copp's Hill Burying Ground
    USS Constitution — “Old Ironsides” & USS
    Constitution Museum
    Bunker Hill Monument

    Our guide and me
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    Paul Revere Statute

    by Mikebb Updated Jun 9, 2008

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    From an early age I had watched movies that told the story of Paul Revere and his famous horse ride. When visiting the United States for the first time late May of 2007 Boston was our point of entry and we were on a guided tour when we saw the statute of Paul on his horse, it was in the park as we approached the Old North Church.

    When we entered the Church the commentary concentrated on that historic night in 1775 when the lanterns were placed high on the church to indicate the British we taking the coastal route on their march on Lexington. Paul commenced this famous ride from the Old North Church, however we were told he did not ride the whole distance, after several miles other riders took over.

    Paul Revere Paul Revere
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    The Freedom Trail - History Of Independence

    by Mikebb Updated Jun 7, 2008

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    America was a colony of England and Boston played a most important part in bringing about independence from British rule. This trail incorporates the historic sites from those times of John Adams, Samuel Adams, Crispus Attucks, John Hancock and others including Paul Revere during the years leading up to the Declaration of Independence in 1776.

    The Flag indicates the Freedom Trail and there are painted lines on the footpath for you to follow. Commencing at State House / Boston Common it winds past Park Street Church, The King's Chapel, Old South Meeting House, The Old State House Museum, Paul Revere House, Old North Church, across the Charlestown Bridge to the Inner Harbour and Visitor Centre.

    If you have time and are fit the trail is walkable, the alternative is to take a coach sighteeing tour. We were on a 13 day coach tour and were taken to most locations, however during free time later in the day we revisited some sites including the Old State House Museum.

    The Freedom Trail - Notice Freedom Trail Banner
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    Boston Athenaeum

    by Jefie Updated Jun 1, 2008

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    The Boston Athenaeum is perhaps one of the lesser known spots on the Freedom Trail, but I think it's worth a visit. Founded in 1807, it is one of America's largest membership libraries. Past members have included the likes of Ralph Waldo Emerson, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Daniel Webster and Nathaniel Hawthorne. Today the library holds about 600,000 volumes, and the core of its collection focuses on local history, literature, biographies and fine arts. Members drop by to read, do research or to socialize at the Athenaeum's Wednesday afternoon teas. Visitors are also welcome to drop by and look around the first floor of the building, which generally includes temporary exhibits (don't worry, the staff is very friendly!). Guided tours are offered on Tuesday and Thursday at 3:00 pm, but they must be booked in advance. The Boston Athenaeum is open on weekdays from 9:00 am to 5:30 pm.

    Boston Athenaeum on Beacon Street
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    Irish Famine Memorial

    by Jefie Updated Jun 1, 2008

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    I honestly don't remember being so moved by an urban piece of art. To commemorate the 150th anniversary of the Irish Famine, Boston's Irish community unveiled a memorial park in 1998, featuring a wonderful sculpture by artist Robert Shure. It consists of two life-size sculptures, one depicting a family leaving Ireland's shores, impoverished and desperate, and another depicting a family arriving in Boston, filled with hope and determination. You will come upon the Memorial if you follow the Freedom Trail.

    Irish family arriving in Boston... Irish Famine Memorial The Irish Memorial park in Boston
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    Walking through history

    by Jefie Updated May 31, 2008

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    Boston's Freedom Trail is the best and easiest way to see much of what Boston has to offer. This 2.5 mile (4 km) walking trail starts at Boston Common and takes you to the 16 most important historic sights of downtown Boston. You don't need a tour guide and you don't need to do any research - all you have to do is follow the red line painted on the sidewalk. Created in 1958, it's probably the most tourist-friendly feature I've ever encoutered!

    The Old Corner Bookstore, on the Freedom Trail Old South Meeting House, on the Freedom Trail Old City Hall, on Boston's Freedom Trail Old North Church, in Boston's North End district
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    Walk Through History

    by donforse Written Jan 18, 2008

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    The Freedom Trail is home to several historical landmarks, which can be viewed at your leisure. Following a 2.5 mile red-brick walking trail will lead you to 16 nationally significant historic sites. The Freedom Trail today is a collection of museums, churches, meeting houses, burying grounds, parks, a ship, and historic markers including:

    The Boston Common
    The State House
    Park Street Church
    Granary Burying Ground
    King’s Chapel
    King’ Chapel Burying Ground
    Benjamin Franklin Statue/Boston Latin School
    Old Corner Book Store
    Old South Meeting House
    Old State House
    Site of the Boston Massacre
    Faneuil Hall
    Paul Revere House
    The Old North Church
    Copp's Hill Burying Ground
    USS Constitution — “Old Ironsides”
    Constitution Museum
    Bunker Hill Monument

    Guided tours are available, as well as group and school tours. Also, you can download an audio tour from the Freedom Trail Foundation website ($15). Put it on your I-Pod, and it gives information on every site. Best of all, it gives you the flexibility to take them in at your leisure. Also, self-guide maps are available at the multitude of visitor centers.

    The best place to start is probably the visitor center located in Boston Common (the first stop on the trail), where you can get all information and walking maps.

    All this information, and more, is available on the Freedom Trail Foundations's website (see below).

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    Freedom Trail

    by diver-x Updated Dec 3, 2007

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    The Freedom Trail starts in the Boston Common and ends up at Charlestown near the USS Constitution and Bunker Hill Monument. You can walk self-guided by following the red line on the sidewalk or take a guided tour courtesy of the National Parks Service. Pictured here is one of the sights you will see, the Old State House, where the Boston Massacre occurred.

    The Old State House on the Freedom Trail
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  • Freedom trail, why not?

    by boick Written Nov 12, 2007

    The freedom trail is a good way to see the city, and get in a good chunk of Boston's history. The freedom trail of Boston is a walking route from Boston common to Bunker Hill with many other stops on the way. The freedom trail runs through the old neighborhoods of North Boston and hits most of the major revelutionary war historical sights. I personally haven't done the freedom trail since my fifth grade field, but its defianetly a good way to spend a day in Boston, especially if your just in town for a day or two.

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    Freedom Trail - Put your map away

    by moonfroggy4 Written Oct 27, 2007

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    Once you find the Freedom Trail (a wide red stripe painted along the tourist path), you can put your guide books and maps away. Simply follow the trail, perhaps crossing the street if you're wary of living out the tourist stereotypes, to hit interesting sites. Boston is a walkable city and many sites are within easy walking distance.

    Gravestone and ivy, Copps Hill Burying Ground Boston architecture Ducklings statue, Boston Public Garden
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  • ibmguy34's Profile Photo

    Walk the Freedom Trail

    by ibmguy34 Written Jul 17, 2007

    This is a great way to see many of the wonderful historic sights in the city of Boston. Go to the visitors center downtown, next to the State Street MBTA stop and you will be able to get a free map.

    Then head for the Boston Common for the first stop and along the way you will see and learn tons about Boston.

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