Granary Burying Ground, Boston

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  • Granary Burying Ground
    Granary Burying Ground
    by mikey_e
  • Granary Burying Ground, Boston
    Granary Burying Ground, Boston
    by antistar
  • Granary Burying Ground, Boston
    Granary Burying Ground, Boston
    by antistar
  • machomikemd's Profile Photo

    Oldest Burial Ground of Boston

    by machomikemd Written Jul 11, 2014
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    The Granary Burying Ground was formerly part of the huge Bostom Common but that area was separated in 1660 AD and was made into a Burial Ground of which many Famous Bostonians and Founding Fathers like Samuel Adams, John Hancock and Robert Treat Paine and a lot more prominent with Massachusetts Governors, Clergymen, and Mayors and rich bostonians are buried here. It was called the Granary Burying ground as the Park Church which sits nearby was formerly a Granary Area (until in 1804 when the Park Church was Built). This area is part of the Freedom Trail and the Nearest MBTA Station is at Park Street Station. There is a trolley bus stop at the Tremont street near the entrance.

    Admission is Free

    Opens: 9:00 am to 5:00 pm everyday

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    Granary Burying Ground

    by Agraichen Written Mar 5, 2014

    The Granary Burying Ground is located on Tremont Street just behind the Park Street Church. Created in 1660 is holds some of Boston's (and the US) most famous patriots.

    I'd not had a chance to wander the rounds until the night I was driving a college bus of classmates to see the movie Gone With the Wind opening at a theater just down the street. The bus broke down right in front of the site. While waiting for a tow truck to help get the bus started again, I wandered the grounds and noted the names of some of history's most famous people (Paul Revere, John Adams, John Hancock.

    Many more of Boston's history are interred there including a number from "The Boston Massacre."

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    Granary Burying Ground

    by CEP1863 Written Oct 25, 2013
    Granary Street Burying Ground
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    This is pretty much at the start of the Freedom Trail and very close to Park Street Church. Having visited it the night before on the Ghosts and Gravestones Tour, we came back to see it in daylight. Here you can find the gravestones of three of the signatories to the Declaration of Independence - Samuel Adams, John Hancock (although there are questions surrounding whether his body was stolen by grave robbers) and Robert Treat Payne. Paul Revere is also buried here as well as Benjamin Franklin's parents and victims of the Boston Massacre.

    As the gravestones have been moved over time in order to create a more orderly and thus easier to maintain cemetery, there are very few stones marking the actual graves. What it does give you though is a good sense of the historical importance of the city.

    It is open from 09:00am to 05:00pm daily.

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    Granary Burying Ground

    by antistar Written May 22, 2013

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    Granary Burying Ground, Boston
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    This central burial ground is the third oldest in the city and is the final resting place of many famous figures in Boston and America's history. Given its age there are many people buried here who were English born Americans, like Benjamin Franklin's parents. Among the dead remembered here are:

    Paul Revere: the revolutionary patriot made famous by the poem Paul Revere's Ride.
    Samuel Adams, Robert Treat Paine and John Hancock: All signatories of the Declaration of Independence.
    The victims of the Boston Massacre.
    Samuel Sewall: Judge in the Salem Witch Trials.
    Phillis Wheatley: First African-American poet.

    The burial ground was originally part of Boston Common, but took its name from the granary that was built where Park Street Church now stands.

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    Granary Burying Ground

    by Jim_Eliason Updated Jan 29, 2013

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    A virtual who's who of Colonial history are buried here including the victims of the Boston Massacre, Paul Revere, John Hancock and Benjamin Franklin's parents (Franklin himself is buried in Philadelphia).

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    Old Granary Burying Ground

    by Gypsystravels Updated Jan 23, 2013

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    Old Headstones
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    The Old Granary dating back to the 1660's is the city's second oldest cemetary. It contains the remains of many Revolutionary heroes. Here you'll find the graves of John Hancock, Samuel Adams, Thomas Paine, and of course the gravesite of Paul Revere. Benjamin Franklin's parents are buried here and so is Mother Goose!!!

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    Granary Burying Ground

    by PinkFloydActuary Written Aug 20, 2011

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    Paul Revere
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    There are several Burying Grounds along the Freedom Trail, but you will see the final resting place of a number of famous names at Granary. Samuel Adams was the first one that caught my eye from the street. There are two large monuments, one for John Hancock, and the other says "Franklin" - upon further inspection, it is not the resting place of Ben, but of his parents.

    The grounds are laid out pretty well - you can take a path along the outside of the grounds, and there are several footpaths through the middle as well. When I was there, they were doing some construction on the walkways, which is always helpful :)

    It's amazing how well some of the markers have kept up over time. I think anyone with an interest in the history of the country will be impressed with their time at this location.

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    Old Granary Burying Ground

    by Tijavi Updated Feb 19, 2010

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    The leafy cemetery is a perfect escape
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    Downtown Boston is littered with old colonial cemeteries a.k.a. burying grounds, but what perhaps stands out is Old Granary Burying Ground on Tremont Street - a very prime real estate. Buried here are "prime" names indeed - Boston's patriotic sons like John Hancock and Paul Revere.

    Doubts though exist whether John Hancock remains buried here. It was said robbers took away John Hancock's hand which he used to sign the Declaration of Independence. It is also believed that his body was taken away during some construction work in the 19th century.

    Whatever the truth is about the mystery behind John Hancock's remains, the leafy cemetery is a pleasant site to visit to escape Boston's urban cityscape - and be among Boston's patriots long dead, but never forgotten.

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    Granary Burying Ground

    by cjg1 Updated Jan 20, 2010

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    The Granary Burying Ground is an old cemetery in Boston dating back to 1660. The Cemetery has many olfd graves and headstones of famous historical figures such as: Samuel Adams, Paul Revere, John Hancock, James Otis, Peter Faneuil and Benjamin Franklin's parents. Many victims of the Boston Massacre are slo buried in this cemetery.

    I am not a big fan of cemeteries or walking around people's graves. My wife on the other hand loves cemeteries so I indulged here and waited outside the gate as she wandered through the cemetery exploring the headstones.

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  • mikey_e's Profile Photo

    Granary Burying Ground

    by mikey_e Written Apr 14, 2009

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    Boston has a number of old cemeteries that are, without doubt, quite necessary stops on anyone’s tourist agenda. No, I’m not macabre, but you have to remember that Boston is quite an old city for British North America, and you are unlikely to be able to see European grave sites as old as these in many other places in North America. The Granary Burying Ground is a great cemetery to visit, as it is adjacent to the Park Church (which is at the start of Freedom Trail) and because it is “home” to a number of famous Bostonians’ graves. You can see here the tombs of Paul Revere, John Hancock, Samuel Adams (more than just a beer, he was a Patriot and signer of the Constitution) and the tombs of the Franklin family, although Benjamin Franklin is buried in Philadelphia, not Boston. The Burying Ground is open to all and free of charge, so you can wander at will and take pictures of interesting monuments. Rubbings are not permitted, but in truth few gravestones are still in a state that would produce anything interesting if they were rubbed.

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    Granary Burial Ground-Mother Goose's Grave

    by moiraistyx Updated Aug 18, 2008

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    Gravestone of

    This is a neat little tidbit of information. Elizabeth Vergoose, who is believed to be "Mother" Goose is buried here somewhere in the cemetery. There is a headstone, but no one is really positive if she's buried there or somewhere else in the cemetery.

    After doing some research I discovered that the burial ground was founded in 1660 and is the 3rd oldest burial ground in Boston. It gets its name from the fact that grain was once stored where the current church now stands back in 1737, which is when the graveyard was named.

    Visiting the burial ground is free of course but it's only open from 9 AM to 5 PM.

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    Old Granary Burying Ground

    by Jefie Updated Jun 1, 2008

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    That's me, exploring the Granary Burying Ground
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    Dating back to 1660, the Granary Burying Ground is a very popular stop along the Freedom Trail. Samuel Adams, John Hancock, Paul Revere, Benjamin Franklin's parents, Peter Faneuil and the victims of the Boston Massacre are all buried there. Among the cemetery's weird stories is the grave robbing that took place in 1793, when John Hancock was buried - that very same night, grave robbers cut off his hand with which he had signed the Declaration of Independence!

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    The Granary Burying Ground

    by Paul2001 Written Aug 14, 2007

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    The Granary Burying Ground
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    Probably one of the oldest cemetery that I have visited in North America, the Granary Burying Ground sits next to the Park Street Church.The Granary Burying Ground was founded in 1660 and was laid down next to a grainery, hence the name. It is here that many of the leading figures of the American Revolution were buried. You seem to step back a couple of centuries upon entering the Granary Burying Ground as the tombstones are so old and the grounds so atmospheric. Wander around the cemetery and you will find many of the graves of Revolutionary heros and signers of the Declaration of Independence. You can easily find the tombstones of such notables as Samuel Adams, Paul Revere and John Hancock For this reason it almost feels like a historical pilgrim site. Also buried here are the five men who died at the Boston Massacre. It is easy to tour the Granary Burying Ground as it is only about two acres in size. The location of the graves are marked out on maps at various stations around the grounds.
    The Granary Burying Ground is open daily from 9am to 5pm and it is free to visit.

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    Granary Burying Ground

    by Joseph69 Updated Jan 22, 2007

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    Granary Burying Ground

    The Granary Burying Ground with its impressive large front gate is the 3rd oldest burial ground in Boston. It was founded in 1660. It was renamed "Granary" in 1737 due to grain being stored where the current Park Street Church now stands.

    Many Massachussets Mayors, Governors and Clergymen are buried here, as well as 3 of the signers (John Hancock, Robert Treat Paine and Samuel Adams) of the Declaration of Independence!

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    Park Street Church

    by Joseph69 Written Jan 22, 2007
    Park Street Chruch

    From 1809, the Park Street Church (Evangical Church) is the site of the old town granary. This is where the grain was kept prior to the Revolution. In 1818, thsi chruch was also the site of the first Sunday school.

    On the 4th of July, 1829, William Lloyd Garrison gave gave his first anti-slavery speech to the public.

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