Paul Revere House, Boston

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    Paul Revere's House, Boston
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    Paul Revere's House

    by antistar Updated Jan 30, 2014

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    Paul Revere's House, Boston
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    Paul Revere's house wouldn't look out of place in Stratford-upon-Avon or any other Tudor town in England. Shakespeare could have lived here and I wouldn't have been surprised. It's not Colonial architecture, the age of which makes Boston feel old, it's pre-Colonial.

    It hasn't survived because the value of the house was immediately recognised. Revere may have been a hero of the revolution, but after he sold his house it became a tenement with its ground floor used as a shop in various guises. Only after its purchase in 1902 by Revere's grandson was it saved for posterity.

    Today it is a museum that lies in Boston's oldest residential community: North End.

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    Paul Revere Mall

    by Gypsystravels Updated Apr 4, 2013

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    Paul Revere Statue at the Mall
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    The Paul Revere Mall is a small park named after the famous American patriot with a large bronze statue of him in the center of the mall. The mall is along the Freedom Trail lined with trees and a brick wall on either side. Here you will find some interesting plaques which retell stories of some of Boston's most famous sons along with some history of old Boston.

    There is also a touching memorial shrine with dog tags of service men here at the mall. The Paul Revere mall is located between two famous churches, the Old North Church behind the mall and St. Stephen's Church to the front. As you approach the end of the mall you will find the steps that lead to the Old North Church.

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    Paul Revere House

    by Gypsystravels Updated Jan 23, 2013

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    The grey clapboard house
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    The Paul Revere House is the oldest building in downtown Boston. It was built in 1680 and it is where Paul Revere lived with his family from 1770 to 1800. This is also the house where Paul Revere rode off on the famous "midnight ride" to Lexington and Concord to warning cries that "British" were coming!!

    The building is now owned and operated by The Paul Revere Memorial Association and tours of the interior are given for a fee.

    The House is along the Freedom Trail route.

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    Freedom Trail - The Paul Revere House

    by donforse Updated Apr 4, 2011
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    Make it a point to stop by and visit the Paul Revere house. Revere and his family lived here during the American Revolution, and the site offers great insight into his life and his role in history.

    From their website:

    "The restored dwelling, with its third story front extension removed, resembles its late seventeenth century appearance. Ninety percent of the structure, two doors, three window frames, and portions of the flooring, foundation, inner wall material and raftering, are original. The heavy beams, large fireplaces, and absence of interior hallways recall colonial living arrangements. Upstairs you will find two chambers containing period furnishings belonging to the Revere family. Revere House tours are self-guided, complemented by illustrated text panels and museum interpreters.

    As an added bonus, the courtyard features a 900 pound bell, a small mortar and a bolt from the USS Constitution, all made by Paul Revere & Sons."

    For more information such as hours of operation and more about Revere and the famous midnight ride, please visit the website (see below).

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    The Paul Revere House

    by Kaspian Updated Jul 12, 2010

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    Paul Revere House (2006)
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    Dammit, I hate when signs say, "No photos allowed." It makes me feel like a school kid who really wants to be bad--maybe snap a pic when no one's looking. Walking through this small two-storey wooden house in Boston's North End is treacherous for a tall man; beams and doorframes are unexpectedly waiting around corners to smash my forehead.
    Every detail of Paul Revere and his family's life are posted on signs around the house. He was a wealthy silversmith! Who knew?
    "Paul", as I like to call him, owned the home from 1770 to 1800. He lived here with his first wife (Sarah), his mother, and his five children. Cramped quarters it must have been.
    It was from this house that Paul Revere set out on horseback on his legendary "Midnight Ride" on April 18, 1775. He rode through the night to warm militias at Lexington and Concord about British troops approaching Boston across the Charles River by shouting, "The British are coming! The British are coming!" Err... OK, actually he didn't say that. What he said was, "The regulars are coming out!" which doesn't sound anywhere near as dramatic, so I can see why they changed it in the folklore. However, that night was to mark the beginning of the War of Independence!
    The house itself was sold by Revere in 1800. It became a tenement, bank, candy shop, cigar store, and from the look of old photographs inside, it was just about ready to be demolished when Paul Revere's great-grandson, John P. Reynolds Jr bought it in 1902. He raised money to renovate and properly restore the building and it was opened in 1908 as one of the earliest historic house museums in the US. Most of the building is original and the inside has been furnished with period furnishings. In the courtyard of the building is a large bell that Paul Revere and Sons had made for the ship the USS Constitution.
    Admission was cheap, only $3 for an adult. And a walkthrough of the house takes less than a half-hour.

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    Paul REvere Lived Here

    by BruceDunning Updated Oct 19, 2008

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    The Paul Revere house is intact and taken over by a society in early 1900's. It brought the structure back to its 1680 appearance. REvere lived to 83 years, and was a postman, coppersmith and was one of the first to start rolling sheet, a silversmith, chairmaker. had a foundry for bells and nails, and handled horses. He also What else? He could ride when needed, per the fame of folk heroes. The tours are $4 and available most of the time Tues -Sunday 9:30-5:00. At most a 1/2 hour tour.
    Paul Revere Mall is a park heading toward North Church, and coming from Stephens church. It was a donation by a generous citizen and there are plaques commemorating the tributes to people who fought for freedoms and were influential in that period.

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  • moiraistyx's Profile Photo

    Granary Burial Ground-Paul Revere's Grave

    by moiraistyx Updated Aug 18, 2008

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    Paul Revere's grave

    Paul Revere was a talented silversmith and member of the Revolutionary movement in Massachusetts, his attempts to warn prominent Massachusetts patriot members Samuel Adams and John Hancock, as well as the Lexington countryside of the impending approach of British Regular troops on April 18, 1775 was popularized by poet William Wadsworth Longfellow's highly fictionalized poem "The Midnight Ride of Paul Revere".

    My family and I happened to stumbled upon this grave and the "Mother" Goose grave while out celebrating my college graduation. After doing some research I discovered that the burial ground was founded in 1660 and is the 3rd oldest burial ground in Boston. It gets its name from the fact that grain was once stored where the current church now stands back in 1737, which is when the graveyard was named.

    Visiting the burial ground is free of course but it's only open from 9 AM to 5 PM.

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    Paul Revere House

    by Paul2001 Written Sep 9, 2007

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    Paul Revere House

    Noteable for being the home of the famed silversmith and patriot, Paul Revere's home is also the oldest house in Boston. It was built in 1680 and is nothing more that a shack by 21st century standards. Of note, it was illegal to build homes out of wood back in late 17th century Boston so this home was constructed violating those rules. The house has been turned into a museum dedicated to Paul Revere. The interior of the two story house consists of four rooms which have been restored. Each room has displays depicting late 18th century life with colonial area furniture and silverware. As you wander through, you might want to consider that Mr. Revere had 16 children. How could he accommodate them here is a wonder. The house is not air-conditioned and it was very hot here during my visit.
    The Paul Revere House is open from 9am to 5:15pm and it cost $5.00 to visit.

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    Paul Revere Museum

    by Helga67 Updated Oct 31, 2006

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    Paul Revere Museum
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    This house was built around 1680 and is the oldest wooden building in downtown Boston. It was the home of Paul Revere and his family from 1770 to 1800. You can visit his home and learn more about him and his life as a silversmith. You can visit the kitchen, living room and 2 bedrooms.

    Paul Revere is famous for his “midnight ride". In 1775, Paul Revere rode through the streets warning everyone that the British troops were coming, and so he played an important role in the American history.

    Entrance: 3 USD
    No photos are allowed inside.

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    Paul Revere House

    by jasperdo Written Jun 14, 2006

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    Even without a celebrity name attached to it, the Paul Revere House is quite an historic gem. The house itself pre-dates Revere's historic ride by nearly 100 years. It was built around 1680, making it one of the oldest buildings in the United States. Extensively remodeled after Revere sold the house in 1800, it has since been restored more to its original appearence. The interior of the house can be viewed on a self guided tour, and contains restored rooms with some original Revere furnishings. Admission is $3.00, and although it only takes about 15 minutes to walk through, I felt it was worth the admission.

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    Paul Revere House

    by PetraG Written Jan 11, 2006

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    In 1775, local silversmith Paul Revere left this house to warn fellow rebels Sam Adams and John Hancock that British troops were headed to Lexington to arrest them. That night was immortalized by Longfellow's poem, Paul Revere's Ride.

    The home was built in the late 1600s and bought by Revere in 1770. It just escaped the wrecking ball when Revere's descendents recovered the property in 1902. Now a national historic landmark, the building is the oldest in downtown Boston.

    Admission: $2.50 adults; $2 seniors and students; $1 children.

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  • leffe3's Profile Photo

    Paul Revere House

    by leffe3 Written Jun 3, 2003

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    On the Freedom Trail, the Paul Revere House, a small clapboard house is the oldest in Boston, having been built in 1680. It was also the home of the blacksmith Revere, one of the three messengers who carried the advance warning of the British marching into Lexington & Concord in 1775.

    It is now a small museum, giving insight into the way of life of New Englanders in the 18th century.

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  • Jim_Eliason's Profile Photo

    Paul Revere House

    by Jim_Eliason Updated May 22, 2011

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    Paul Revere House
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    This house dates from 1680 built by Increase Mather the minister of the second church of Boston. In 1770 its most famous resident, silversmith Paul Revere owned the house.

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