State House, Boston

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    Massachusetts State House, Boston
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  • Jefie's Profile Photo

    Massachusetts State House

    by Jefie Written Jun 1, 2008

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    Massachusetts State House
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    The state's capitol building is easily recognizable thanks to its massive golden dome. Located in the Beacon Hill area, the State House was designed by Charles Bulfinch, one of the city's most prominent architects. The main building was completed in 1798 and is open to visitors free of charge. After going through security, you can join a guided tour or you can visit the building on your own, which I thought was rather unusual - every time I turned a corner I was afraid someone would tell me I had no business there but no, the staff was actually quite friendly and made sure to welcome us every time we'd step into a new room. As there were many school groups around, it was a bit difficult to hear what the tour guide was saying so I was glad we were given the option of going on a self-guided tour (we got to visit the Doric Hall, the Nurses Hall, the Hall of Flags, the Great Hall, the House of Representatives, the Senate Chamber and the Library).

    The State House is open for visit from 10:00 am to 4:00 pm on weekdays.

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    The Old State House

    by Paul2001 Written Aug 29, 2007

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    The Old State House and Boston Massacre site.

    The Old State House, built in 1713, is Boston's oldest public building. This was the seat of the old Colonial Government. It is a very pretty building with a tall white spire and built with bright red bricks. The balcony is famous for being the place where, in July 18, 1776, the Declaration of Independence was read to the locals. Even importantly, the spot on the eastside of the building, Devonshire and State streets, where the Boston Massacre took place on March 5, 1770 when British soldiers killed five protesting patriots. Inside of the Old State House is a passable museum dedicated to history of Boston with special emphasis place upon the Revolution. I visited this in 1996 but took a pass on it in 2007.
    The museum is open from 9am to 5pm daily and it costs $5.00 to enter.

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  • Helga67's Profile Photo

    State House

    by Helga67 Updated Oct 31, 2006

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    State House

    The State House is a remarkable building located across from the Boston Common on the top of Beacon Hill. It was built in 1798. The dome, originally made out of wood shingles, is now sheathed in copper and covered by 23 karat gold.

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    New State House

    by jasperdo Written Sep 21, 2006

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    Where else but in Boston, would a building from 1798 be called the "New" State House. That's because the "Old" State House from 1713 still stands. The New State House is the State Capitol Building, and is a beautiful structure. The gold dome shines brightly and makes the New State House very easy to spot.

    Directly across from the front entrance is the historic sculpture depicting the 54th Regiment. This all Black Regiment served in the Civil War and is depicted in the movie 'Glory'.

    Inside, the New State House is very attractive. Marble is everywhere, and there are murals and stained glass windows at every turn. Guided tours are offered, or you can explore on your own.

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  • moiraistyx's Profile Photo

    THE NEW STATE HOUSE

    by moiraistyx Updated Sep 12, 2006

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    THE NEW STATE HOUSE

    Construction of the "new" State House was completed in 1798 after 3 years of hard work. It stands directly across from the Boston Commons and on top of Beacon Hill on land once own by John Hancock. It was designed by a leading architect of the time, Charles Bullfinch. It's famous dome was once made of wooden shingles. Today it is sheather in copper, covered by 23 karat gold. A wooden codfish hangs in the House of Representatives chambers. It is said that the codfish signifies the importance of the fishing industry to the Commonwealth.

    Tours are free to the public and the building is open Monday through Friday, 10:00am to 4:00pm.

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    Massachusetts State House

    by Hopkid Written Jul 24, 2006

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    The seat of Massachusetts' governement, the State House sits on Beacon Street looking down on Boston Common. It is very distinctive with its golden dome designed by Charles Bulfinch and built in 1789 on land owned by John Hancock, a prominent signer of the Declaration of Independence.

    Free tours are offered Monday through Friday between 10am and 3pm. Call ahead for reservations (see number below). There is also an option of a self-guided tour from 9am through 5pm Monday through Saturday.

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    Massachusetts State House; Freedom Trail stop 2

    by KarenandCory Updated Feb 23, 2006

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    Located at the corner of Beacon and Park Street, the "new" State House is the seat of government for Massachusetts.
    The building was finished in 1798 and was designed by Charles Bulfinch in the Georgian Neoclassical style. Several additions were made in later years. The gold dome was originally made out of wood shingles and is now copper covered by 23k gold.

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    Massachusetts State house

    by PetraG Written Jan 11, 2006

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    Massachusetts State House
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    It is a part of Boston University and is located just next to Boston Common.
    Have a quick look inside, it's architecture is really worth a look!

    I liked best the stained-glass skylight in the Statehouse. Seals of the original 13 colonies surround Massachusetts' seal and motto: "Ense petit placidam sub libertate quietem." It means: "By the sword we seek peace, but peace only under liberty."

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    Massachusetts State House

    by Ewingjr98 Written Oct 7, 2005

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    Massachusetts State House, Beacon Hill, Boston
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    Perched on Beacon Hill, the State House is the home of Massachusetts' state government, and its statues, paintings, and artifacts make this building a museum dedicated to the state's history.

    The building was constructed by Boston's famous architect, Charles Bulfinch, and was completed in 1798. The cornerstone was laid by none other than Sam Adams and Paul Revere. The original building, known as the Bulfinch Front, today makes up less than 10% of the existing structure after a major expansion in 1895 and a smaller expansion in 1917.

    Outside of the State House, you will find statues of Daniel Webster, Civil War General Joseph Hooker, and John F. Kennedy among others.

    One of my favorite areas inside the State House is the Hall of Flags. On display here are flags from the Civil War, the Spanish-American War, the Korean War, and the Vietnam War.

    The Senate Chamber lies directly under the golden dome.

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    Boston's Old State House

    by Tom_Fields Written Sep 17, 2005

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    The Old State House

    Built in 1713, this was the seat of local and state government. It was also the site of the 1770 Boston Massacre, where British troops fired upon a crowd of unruly colonials, killing three. On July 18, 1776, the people of the city gathered below the balcony to hear the Declaration of Independence.

    This is a key part of the famous Freedom Trail.

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  • Krumlovgirl's Profile Photo

    New State House

    by Krumlovgirl Written Jun 1, 2005

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    It would be hard to miss the beautiful golden domed building of the New State House. Located across from the Common and on the edge of Beacon Hill on Beacon Street, it truly is an astounding site. Being “new” it was built between 1795 and 1797 on land that was owned by John Hancock. Free tours are given year round from 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. and last about 30 to 45 minutes. You can also give yourself a self-guided tour by picking up an info sheet. Just remember that it is closed on Saturday.

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  • The New State House

    by ElaineCatherine Written Mar 2, 2005

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    If you are out by the Commons and by Beacon Hill take a walk around the New State House. It is a really beautiful building and it has lots of interesting statues and commerative plaques around. Try to find the donkey statues, my kids like to try to ride on them!

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  • smschley's Profile Photo

    State House

    by smschley Updated Feb 26, 2005

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    Boston is home to two State houses. The "new" State House was designed by Charles Bulfinch, the leading architect of the day, with building starting in 1795 and completed in 1798. On July 4, 1795, two surviving fathers of the Revolution were on hand to break ground on the site that would house the ideals of their new Commonwealth in a graceful seat of government. Both Governor Samuel Adams and Paul Revere attended and jointly laid the cornerstone.

    The dome was originally made out of wood shingles and sheathed in copper installed by Paul Revere In was gilded in 1874 and again in 1997 with 23 karat gold. During World War II, the dome was painted gray so that it would not reflect moonlight during blackouts and thereby offer a target to anticipated German bombers. On the tops stands a pinecone, a symbol of the importance of pine wood, which was integral to the construction of Boston's early houses and churches, as well as the State House itself.

    Inside the State House are Doric Hall, with its statuary and portraits; the Hall of Flags, with an exhibit of the battle flags from all the wars in which Massachusetts regiments have participated; the Great Hall, an open space used for state functions that houses 351 flags from the cities and towns of Massachusetts; the governor's office; and the chambers of the House and Senate. The Great hall holds many pieces of art with the best-known being the carved wooden Sacred Cod, mounted in the Old State House in 1784 as a symbol of the commonwealth's maritime wealth.

    In the front lawn are two statues of note. One is of Anne Hutchinson, who challenged the religious hierarchy of the Massachusetts Bay Colony. She was excommunicated in 1638 and sentenced to banishment. Later she became one of the founders of Rhode Island. Her supporter, Mary Dyer, was also excommunicated; she later converted to the Quaker faith and was finally hanged for defending her beliefs

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  • yooperprof's Profile Photo

    Massachusets State House

    by yooperprof Written May 5, 2004

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    Commonwealth landmark

    Isn't it interesting that Boston is the capital of Massachusetts? Well, I guess it is interesting if you a "state capital fanatic" like me. I mean, how many states have their capital in their largest and most important city? Not all that many.

    Anyhow, the Massachusetts State House is a proud and fitting reminder of Boston's history. It was designed by architect Charles Bulfinch and completed in 1798, making it older than the U.S. Capitol in Washington. When it was built, the State House was on the far outskirts of the City of Boston; it still dominates its Beacon Hill neighborhood.

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  • amsterdam_vallon's Profile Photo

    Freedom Trail - Tenth Stop -

    by amsterdam_vallon Updated Mar 31, 2004
    Old State House

    Old State House

    Beginning with its construction in 1713, the Old State House was the headquarters of British government in Boston. The building's distinctive cupola was once the tallest and most impressive building in the town, sending the message that there was no higher authority than the king.

    It was just outside these doors that the Boston Massacre unfolded in 1770, and from this balcony that the Declaration was first read to the people of Boston in 1776. Now, Old State is the oldest surviving public building in Boston, housing as a museum of Boston history operated by the Bostonian Society.

    Freedom Trail Walking Info :
    Across the street on the traffic island is the site of the Boston Massacre.

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