T / subway, Boston

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  • waiting for ride
    waiting for ride
    by machomikemd
  • T / subway
    by jamiesno
  • Lighted info signs inside a T station.
    Lighted info signs inside a T station.
    by joanne828
  • Gypsystravels's Profile Photo

    Purchasing your T tickets

    by Gypsystravels Updated Feb 1, 2010
    Ferni purchasing our Charlie Card

    If you are visiting Boston and plan to use the T then purchasing a stored value Charlie Card is probably the way to go. There are vending machines in every station and its quite easy to use the machines. There are a few different type of cards, depending on your usuage you may want to purchase an all day/one day Charlie Card which will cost you $9. If you plan to to use it one way directions, then the per ride price is now $2.00.

    Ferni and I found the machines to be easy to use and if you use it per ride, you can both use the same card, just put the amount you want on the card.

    Related to:
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  • Unreliable and mismanaged

    by LFI123 Written Aug 7, 2009

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    I went to collage in New York, rode on the London tube, Octo on Hong Komg and traveled in Japan. If you compare to any o these, Boston T is the worst managed. There was a write up in the globe that MBTA, who oversees the T, are the highest compensated and least efficient. You don't always get what you pay for and you will see that with T. It wasn't bad when T was cheap. But when a ride is $2, you start pondering. Unfortunately, cabs in Boston is expensive so we are not left with many options. So here are my tips.
    1. Avoid Green E line. It never comes. If you need to get to Cambridge Galleria, take Redline then a free shuttle
    2. Avoid B line. B stops every 5 blocks. Mbta tries to kill some of these stops but it was overruled.
    3 Stick with C or D line if you can. Trains are often newer.
    4. Always allocate extra half an hour. T often runs back to back with large gaps. Livon on C line starting stAtion, T workers chat and run trains one after another with large gaps. I you see 'every 15 mins', assume '2 trains every 30 mins'
    5. Asking for help is impossible. Beat to assime that People working for the T and people living I'm Boaton will not help you.
    6. Redline, blue are fast. Green is slow. Orange is fast but seldom.
    For those who live in Boaton and can afford parking, we avoid the T. And when we UAE it, we do not count on it. If you are traveling in the downtown area, it's not bad.

    When traveling on the T, try to keep these tips mind.

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  • Unreliable and mismanaged

    by LFI123 Written Aug 7, 2009

    I went to collage in New York, rode on the London tube, Octo on Hong Komg and traveled in Japan. If you compare to any o these, Boston T is the worst managed. There was a write up in the globe that MBTA, who oversees the T, are the highest compensated and least efficient. You don't always get what you pay for and you will see that with T. It wasn't bad when T was cheap. But when a ride is $2, you start pondering. Unfortunately, cabs in Boston is expensive so we are not left with many options. So here are my tips.
    1. Avoid Green E line. It never comes. If you need to get to Cambridge Galleria, take Redline then a free shuttle
    2. Avoid B line. B stops every 5 blocks. Mbta tries to kill some of these stops but it was overruled.
    3 Stick with C or D line if you can. Trains are often newer.
    4. Always allocate extra half an hour. T often runs back to back with large gaps. Livon on C line starting stAtion, T workers chat and run trains one after another with large gaps. I you see 'every 15 mins', assume '2 trains every 30 mins'
    5. Asking for help is impossible. Beat to assime that People working for the T and people living I'm Boaton will not help you.
    6. Redline, blue are fast. Green is slow. Orange is fast but seldom.
    For those who live in Boaton and can afford parking, we avoid the T. And when we UAE it, we do not count on it. If you are traveling in the downtown area, it's not bad.

    When traveling on the T, try to keep these tips mind.

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    Which Letter Did They Say

    by moiraistyx Updated Feb 26, 2009

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Sebastian, Gryphon and Thaddeus their first subway
    1 more image

    My first week in Boston I was terrified of riding the T because I never had been on a subway before. Well what a mistake that was. I went home my first weekend to visit my boyfriend and had to navigate the T trains by myself. Well, B, C, D, they all sound similar. I got on the wrong train and ended up at Boston College instread of Boston University. Luckily the T driver was nice and he let me back on and directed me at Kenmore Square to the right train. Once you have the letters down then you master the colors, green line, red line, orange line, purple line, silver line and blue line. Can you remember all that. When in doubt grab a T map, it will definately help. On most lines the T-Fare will run you $1.70 in each direction. If you are visiting Boston and plan on using the T a lot, you can invest in a visitors pass or one of the monthy passes offered depending on your length of stay. The last trains leave at anywhere between midnight and 12:45 AM, so if you are partying late you'll need to find an alternative, such as a cab.

    Related to:
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  • Quartzy's Profile Photo

    A different kind of subway!

    by Quartzy Written Jan 17, 2009

    We wanted to try the T mainly for the hell of it.

    First, we were confused by the fact that there was no human being selling tickets at all - at least at the station we entered. Luckily, a guard proved overly friendly and helped us purchase the tickets from the machine and told us what train to catch.
    It probably wasn't all that complicated, but he certainly brightened our day.

    The subway in Boston is not like the subway in Montreal or in NYC. It's much shakier and slower (and well, if it's going to be shaky, you probably want it to be slower anyway), so we were taken aback a little. But still. The T is a good way to get around if you get tired of walking, and we felt safe in there.

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  • BruceDunning's Profile Photo

    Subway Short Ride

    by BruceDunning Written Oct 16, 2008

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Map of subway lines

    I believe the use of subways must be for the immediate locals living within a couple of miles of downtown. The lines do not go out further than that. To get farther out, then a transfer to bus, or rail is needed, so why do it? Also the costs are based on zones, and subway costs is $2.00 to $4.75 for the area covered. Going out farther then costs additional zone fare to final termination point.

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  • bocmaxima's Profile Photo

    Airport by "T"

    by bocmaxima Written Jul 9, 2008

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Contrary to what you may read, Boston's Logan Airport is not directly served by the subway ("T") system. Instead, the connections to the subway require taking a bus from the airport.
    If arriving, when you get outside of the terminal, you have two choices: Silver Line and Blue Line. The Blue Line is a free shuttle to the Blue Line's Airport station, which is only two stops from Downtown Boston. Once you arrive at the station (very quick), you pay your fare and board the train bound for "Bowdoin". You catch this free shuttle from the "Airport Shuttles" area outside of the terminal.
    Your other choice is the Silver Line, which is a different thing entirely. Contrary to the name, it's actually just a bus and uses the tunnel to get into town, so, unlike the Blue Line method, this is subject to traffic conditions. The Silver Line boards in its own area, further down from the "Airport Shuttles" area. The bus is silver in color and will say "Silver Line" on the front marquee.
    If departing, and wanting to use the Blue Line method, you first need to determine which terminal you're departing from so that you'll save yourself time. Reason being that, from the Airport T station, there are two separate shuttle buses: one to Terminals A & B and one to Terminals C & E (no D anymore). It's not the end of the world if you pick the wrong one (you can get between terminals on walkways), but it would save you some time to pick the right one. The C & E bus boards a little further down than the A & B bus, and there are overhead signs indicating this whole business at the bus stop.

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    Fares on the T

    by bocmaxima Written Jul 9, 2008

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    If you're going to be in Boston for more than a day and plan on relying on the public transit, it would be most cost-effective to get the 7-day MBTA pass. The pass is good for unlimited travel on the "T" (subway), unlimited travel on MBTA buses, unlimited travel on the ferry running between Long Wharf and Charlestown, and unlimited travel to Zone 1A commuter rail stations (only a couple of these) for 7 days (168 hours) from the purchase time. The pass can be purchased at most kiosks, and is more cost-effective than purchasing a day pass every day at $9, or paying the fare on these various modes multiple times.

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    MBTA Subway - Covers City & Suburbs

    by Mikebb Updated Jun 8, 2008

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Our visit to Boston was on a coach tour and being limited to 2 nights we had no need to use the metro system. However walking around the city we noticed some metro stations and looking at my city map I saw a very good map of the metro rail system.

    There are 5 major lines spread throughout the city and suburbs, Red, Orange, Blue, Silver (Airport) and Green. Some of the lines have connecting sub lines which extend the rail coverage.

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  • Jefie's Profile Photo

    All aboard the "T" !

    by Jefie Updated May 31, 2008

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Commemorative plaque at Park Street

    It's a fairly well known fact that driving in downtown Boston can drive even the most patient driver completely mad. The best way to get around this problem is to leave your car behind and ride the "T", the oldest subway system in North America. It's by far the most convenient, simple and unexpensive way to get around Boston - and an added bonus is that you'll get to mingle with Bostonians!

    Tickets and passes can be purchased at every station, with cash or credit cards. A single fare costs $2, and you can also buy a weekly pass for $15.

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  • Rich62's Profile Photo

    THE SUBWAY (THE "T")

    by Rich62 Written May 26, 2008
    THE SUBWAY MAP
    1 more image

    HERE IS THE OFFICIAL SUBWAY ("T") MAP. COPY IT, STUDY IT, LEARN IT BELIEVE IT, LIVE IT. GREEN LINE, ORANGE LINE, BLUE LINE, RED LINE, INBOUND, OUTBOUND, CHARLIE PASS, CHARLIE CARD, GET POOR CHARLIE OFF THE MTA! WHEW!

    The Boston subway isn't quite as easy to navigate as the Metro in Washington, D.C., but you will catch on. They need some help in their signage, it is often confusing or inadequate. For example, several stops on the map are not even labeled. You have to figure it out.

    Its a bargain, though. For $2.00 you can go anywhere in the city that the tracks go. If you change trains you do not have to pay again to continue your ride. Only if you leave the subway system do you have to repay.

    However the subway would quickly become a daily grind to us if we lived there. Everyone avoids eye contact, rarely is a friendly greeting exchanged, and people's expressions range from utter boredom to bare toleration of the circumstances. From our rural midwestern perspective, thats no way to live.

    It been a long time since the Kingston Trio sang about getting "Poor Charlie off the MTA".

    Related to:
    • Business Travel
    • Budget Travel
    • Road Trip

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  • donforse's Profile Photo

    Use the subway

    by donforse Updated Jan 18, 2008

    Boston is know as a walking city, and you can walk to just about any of the most popular landmarks. When you do need to travel a bit faster or when you go longer distances, I can't recommend the subway highly enough.

    There are dozens of stations located conveniently throughout the city, and the system is easy to get the hang of with plentiful, easy to read maps. Expect large crowds during morning and afternoon rush hours, but the trips are short enough to make this only a minor drawback. A trip from my hotel to Fenway Park, which are on opposite sides of the city, was about 35 minutes including the walk.

    Buy a week-long pass (or a month pass, depending on the length of your stay), as it will be much cheaper in the long run. One trip by subway is about $2.00, regardless of where you go, and those numbers add up quicker than you think.

    Passes, called "Charlie Cards" are available at any station and can be purchased with cash or credit/debit cards from attendents or automated machines.

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  • Take the T

    by boick Updated Nov 12, 2007

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The T is the nickname for the MBTA subway system. The T also refers to busses, commuter rails and ferries, but most commonly the subway. The T is one of the most simple and convinient subway systems I've ridden. T fares are on Charlie tickets which you can purchase from a machine at any underground station. Each ride costs $1.25. You can purchase a ticket with any amount of money on it from these machines. They are relatively simple to use, but I have witnessed many baby-boomers befudle themselve while trying to purchase tickets. The T consists of four subways (red, orange, green, and blue), and one wiered subway/bus hybrid (silver line). All lines go downtown and cover a seperate area outside downtown. The redline and greenline each seperate into seperate lines on one line. The redline simply seperates into the Ashmont or Braintree line, whereas the greenline seperates into B,C,D,E. The redline goes through Camebridge, across the Charles, into Downtown Boston and then into South Boston where one line goes through Dorchester to Ashmont, and the other through Quincy to Briantree. The Greenline goes from Lechemere Square in the eastern corner of Cambridge, through the North End, to Downtown. From there it goes through the back bay into Brookline, Brighton, and Newton to the West. The Orange line starts in Malden, a subburb to the north and runs through Charlestown and the North End into Downtown. It then heads through the Back Bay into Jamaica Plain. The Blueline starts in Revere, a city to the East. From there it runs through the neighborhood of East Boston to Logan Airport, then goes under Boston Harbor to Downtown. The blueline unlike the others ends downtown. The silveline has two parts. One goes from Dudley square in Roxbury, a neighborhood south of downtown, to Downtown. One goes from Downtown to Logan through South Boston and the City Point. The T goes almost everywhere you would possibly want, there is no reason to drive. Driving in Boston is frustrating and dangerous.

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    Taking the T (or Subway to the rest of us)

    by Paul2001 Written Jul 29, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    A subway trolley.
    1 more image

    It is claimed that Boston has the oldest subway in the United States. This shocked me because I thought that New York's was older. For sure it is certainly creeky if efficient. Many of the stations such as Copley, which I frequently used, are being renovated. This is a good thing because I found that the lighting was wanting and unless you are familiar with you surroundings, you might find the T a little threatening.
    The service is run by the Massachusett Bay Transport Authority. The T is rather simple to use. Recently they have installed ticket dispensing machines that dispense a "CharlieTicket". You can purchase as many rides as you need this way for an average of $2.00 a ride. There are four subway lines altogether each represented by colour, Red, Blue, Orange and Green. There is a fifth Silver line that is more a commuter service. They spread out through the city so that anywhere you need to get to as a tourist can be reached by way of the T. Many of the subway trains are in fact trolleys and they really squeek loudly. The T runs from 5am to 12:30pm.

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  • ibmguy34's Profile Photo

    Use the T it's cheap and easy

    by ibmguy34 Written Jul 17, 2007

    Use the T if you need to get around Boston and surrounding areas. Driving and parking in the city is very difficult and expensive.

    The T is still the least expensive mass transit system in the US and it's safe and easy to use.

    They just started using a new fare system (Charlie tickets), so no more tokens.

    Go go their website for more information and ride the oldest subway in America.

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