T / subway, Boston

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  • Gypsystravels's Profile Photo

    Gettng by on the T

    by Gypsystravels Updated Jan 25, 2013

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    One of the
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    One of the best things about a metropolitan city is its network of public transporation. With the oldest subway system in the country, you can't go wrong riding the "T".

    The "T" is a great way to get around Boston. The subway consists of four lines - Green, Orange, Blue, Red and all togehter cover most of the city and the immediate suburbs.

    Living in a city like New York, I am use to riding the public transportation and find the "T" to be efficient and easy to navigate. One thing though, the "T" stops running after 12:30 am at some stations and up to 1:30 am you may be able to get on.

    Make sure to know your designation, your line and the time schedule, occassionaly a bit off.

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    Not bad Subway

    by cjg1 Written Oct 23, 2006

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    The T here is a pretty good subway system. You will find it very easy to use and will get you around as needed. If its not much past midnight. Sadly like so many other systems around the world it does not run late night.

    One more reason New York is better than Boston.

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  • garridogal's Profile Photo

    Ride the T. It smells like Pee!

    by garridogal Updated Jul 27, 2006

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    There's no rhyme or reason to it's schedule. They run single car trains at the height of rush hour so you either have to feel (and likely smell) like a sardine or continue to wait, the a/c is either broken or blasted so high that icicles will form from your nose. The new Green line cars just suck for a variety of reasons and baseball season is a nightmare beyond words.

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  • Jefie's Profile Photo

    All aboard the "T" !

    by Jefie Updated May 31, 2008

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    Commemorative plaque at Park Street

    It's a fairly well known fact that driving in downtown Boston can drive even the most patient driver completely mad. The best way to get around this problem is to leave your car behind and ride the "T", the oldest subway system in North America. It's by far the most convenient, simple and unexpensive way to get around Boston - and an added bonus is that you'll get to mingle with Bostonians!

    Tickets and passes can be purchased at every station, with cash or credit cards. A single fare costs $2, and you can also buy a weekly pass for $15.

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  • travelfrosch's Profile Photo

    The T: Tickets and Tourist Cards

    by travelfrosch Updated Jul 1, 2014

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    The new MBTA Ticket

    Boston has a modest and reasonably efficient public transportation system known as "The T." The primary means to pay your fare is with Charlie tickets (somewhat similar to Metro tickets in Washington DC and Brussels) can be purchased with a set value and "recharged" at fare machines with cash, credit cards, or old MBTA tokens. As of July 1, 2014, a single ride ticket costs $2.65, while a local bus ride costs $2.10, and the inner harbor ferry costs $3.25.

    The prices are so high to encourage use of the new Charlie Card, a "rechargeable" plastic card with stored value (similar to the cards used in London and Washington DC). Fares using the Charlie Card are $2.10 per subway ride (includes transfer to local buses) and $1.60 for the local bus (including free transfer to other buses in one direction, and transfer to the subway for $0.50). You can purchase a Charlie Card online for no charge above the pre-stored fare (e.g., $10 for a card pre-loaded with $10 fare).

    For commuters and tourists, there is an item called the "Link Pass," which, according to the website, will cover most of the transit system. A $70 monthly pass covers subway and local bus. Daily and weekly passes are available for tourists, covering the inner harbor ferry and Zone 1 of Commuter Rail in addition to subway and local buses. A 1-day Link Pass costs $12, while a 7-day pass costs $19. Monthly passes can be purchased online, while weekly and daily passes cannot.

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  • MikeySoft's Profile Photo

    Charlie Cards and Charlie Tickets

    by MikeySoft Updated Apr 24, 2013

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    .
    You can purchase different types of passes. But if you only want a few rides, the CharlieCard or CharlieTicket can be used. You save money with a FREE CharileCard, read on for more info.

    CharlieCard will cost $2.00 per subway rides while the CharlieTicket will cost $2.50 per rides. It is only a savings but 50 cents per ride per persion, but why not, the CharlieTicket is free!

    For buses, it is $1.50 for Charlie Card and $2.00 for Charlie Ticket. The Charlie Card also helps with automatic discount transfers.

    You get a Charlie Ticket by putting money or credit card into the machines at the stations, then use the Charlie Ticket to enter the station.

    You get a Charlie Card by asking the attendant for a FREE one, then you add money to the card using the same machines used to buy Charlie Tickets. Then you use the Charlie Card to enter the station.

    So the Charlie Card is a better deal.

    Children 11 and under ride free with a paying adult.

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  • jessicadf's Profile Photo

    Public transit makes so much sense

    by jessicadf Written Jan 12, 2004

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    In a town where there is no grid pattern to the layout of the streets, drivers are routinely called "massholes" and streets are terribly marked, if at all, taking the T (subway) is one of the sanest transportation choices you can make. The underground stations are warm on a cold day, too. :-)

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    Which Letter Did They Say

    by moiraistyx Updated Feb 26, 2009

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    Sebastian, Gryphon and Thaddeus their first subway
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    My first week in Boston I was terrified of riding the T because I never had been on a subway before. Well what a mistake that was. I went home my first weekend to visit my boyfriend and had to navigate the T trains by myself. Well, B, C, D, they all sound similar. I got on the wrong train and ended up at Boston College instread of Boston University. Luckily the T driver was nice and he let me back on and directed me at Kenmore Square to the right train. Once you have the letters down then you master the colors, green line, red line, orange line, purple line, silver line and blue line. Can you remember all that. When in doubt grab a T map, it will definately help. On most lines the T-Fare will run you $1.70 in each direction. If you are visiting Boston and plan on using the T a lot, you can invest in a visitors pass or one of the monthy passes offered depending on your length of stay. The last trains leave at anywhere between midnight and 12:45 AM, so if you are partying late you'll need to find an alternative, such as a cab.

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  • kazander's Profile Photo

    the T

    by kazander Updated Jul 8, 2004

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    well it rhymes with t....

    Parking in Boston is terrible! Better just to walk or if you'll be travelling a distance take the subway known as the "T". It is a very comprehensible system with maps posted in the stations on the trains. Cost is $1.25 or a tiny token with a T emblazoned on it. It will take you one way, including transfers.. You pay on the train by the conductor.

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  • moirholj's Profile Photo

    Take the T! Leave the car at home.

    by moirholj Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Boston subway 'T' map

    Do yourself a favor, don't try to drive around Boston. If you drove to get to Boston, leave your car at the hotel and take the T! Driving in Boston could quite honestly ruin your trip. Not only are the roads croweded but I swear, with the big dig, the roads literally change overnight. The T is the local subway system and it is EASY to use. Please don't be intimidated by the T, it is nothing like the confusing NYC subway system. It is pretty clean and the maps are quite simple to understand. If you are on the T and you get totally turned around - look for a your person to ask directions. Boston is FULL of college students who know there way around and are not out to get you. Find a friendly, young face and quietly ask directions.

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    Riding the T

    by amapola66 Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Boston Green Line trolley

    I used to rather enjoying riding the T in Boston (link to guide below) .

    Composed of four color-coded lines — red, green, blue, and orange — the T can take you most places throughout downtown Boston.
    The Green line trains (also called "streetcars" or "trolleys") offer a rather spectacularly rocky ride in certain spots, I used to get it to Allston for my musical soirees. You could start off in a tunnel, ratting away from side to side, hanging on for dear life and then be trundling along a street where the T had suddenly become a tram-like vehicle.

    The T appears to be quite logically arranged : 'Inbound' is always toward downtown Boston and 'Outbound' is away from it'. - although I have been on the T with a longtime Boston resident, who got us going in the wrong direction quite some way before I noticed! (I must have been used to the confusion of the London Underground he he ).

    Irrelevant Observation : There used to be quite a large amount of men carrying large bunches of flowers on the Boston T. Hmm

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    What's New In Boston: Charlie Cards on the T

    by diver-x Written Apr 5, 2006

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    The T is in the process of changing its fare collection system from subway tokens (one token = one ride) to the Charlie Card, a new electronic fare system. You will be able to purchase cards in specific dollar increments and the fare will be decremented from your card each time you pass through the fare gates. This is a great idea, especially for visitors to Boston, who only had the choice of single subway tokens, daily visitors' passes (a rip-off if you ask me, at $7/day) or the weekly visitors' pass (again, not a great deal). Now you can purchase a card for $5 or more and use it until your fare is used up.

    HOWEVER, leave it to the T to take a great idea and completely mess up the execution. You can't use the Charlie card at all subway stations yet. They are converting one station at a time and at the stations that have not been converted yet, you still have to use tokens. They've been converting stations since last year and they still have a lot left that are not converted. For instance, my husband, who doesn't travel the T every day took the Red Line subway from Alewife to South Station, unaware of the new system. So he bought 2 tokens at Alewife, expecting to use the 2nd token on the return trip. But on return at South Station, he was forced to buy a Charlie Card instead of using the token.

    Here is a link to a page on the MBTA web site that lists all of the converted stations: http://www.mbta.com/projects_underway/afc/converted_stations.asp

    Monthly passes have already been converted to Charlie and can be used on subways, Commuter Rail and buses. No word yet on when buses & commuter rail will be converted for specific dollar amount cards.

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  • dracko's Profile Photo

    The 'T'

    by dracko Updated Mar 25, 2003

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    One of Boston's Green Line trains

    Boston has a pretty extensive system of public transportation consisting of buses, a subway, commuter trains, and even ferry service. The system collectively is called the 'T', although most tend to use the term primarily to refer to the subway portion of it.

    The subway consists of four lines - Red, Green, Orange, and Blue - and among them covers most of the city and the immediate suburbs. Each line is different, with different "personalities" to its stations and equipment. Incidentally, Boston's is the oldest subway system in the country!

    The ferry services the Inner Harbor and runs the commuter service to the southern suburbs and Logan airport as well.

    The commuter rail spreads all over the Eastern half of Massachusets, north to south, with the trains coming into Boston's two very appropriately named North and South Stations.

    And the buses are... Well, they're buses. They go all over Boston and suburbs.

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  • Take the T

    by ElaineCatherine Written Mar 4, 2005

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    The Red Line

    In Boston we call our public transit "The T" - it's a underground (mostly) train system. It's great fun, and it is very inexpensive. You just buy a token before you get on the train, and deposit it in the slot.

    You dont have to worry about purchasing cards and keeping them til the end or anything like that, which I found confusing on DC's "M"

    There are maps at each and every station and there are several lines, each a different color heading out to different outlying areas of the city. If you just take a quick look at the map it will be very easy to find what you are looking for.

    It's fairly clean too.

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    Subway Short Ride

    by BruceDunning Written Oct 16, 2008

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    Map of subway lines

    I believe the use of subways must be for the immediate locals living within a couple of miles of downtown. The lines do not go out further than that. To get farther out, then a transfer to bus, or rail is needed, so why do it? Also the costs are based on zones, and subway costs is $2.00 to $4.75 for the area covered. Going out farther then costs additional zone fare to final termination point.

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