Cambridge Things to Do

  • Massachusetts Hall, Harvard's oldest building
    Massachusetts Hall, Harvard's oldest...
    by Jefie
  • The boat at dock
    The boat at dock
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  • Enclosed interior to keep you toasty
    Enclosed interior to keep you toasty
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Most Recent Things to Do in Cambridge

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    Mount Auburn Cemetery

    by Jefie Written Jun 6, 2008

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    Mount Auburn Cemetery in Cambridge, MA
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    If you've read some of my other travel pages, you probably already know that I love visiting cemeteries - so when I say that Mount Auburn Cemetery is the most beautiful one I've ever seen, that's actually saying quite a lot! This cemetery was founded back in 1831 and it became America's first "garden" cemetery, moving away from the depressing church graveyards and burying grounds towards a peaceful resting place. The entire cemetery follows an English garden-style design, with hills and lakes and beautiful landscaping throughout its 174 acres - don't forget your camera!

    You can get a map of the cemetery at the main entrance for only 50 cents. Walking and driving audiotours are also available. Visitor Services are located in the chapel near the main entrance - feel free to ask questions, they'll be happy to help you make the most of your visit. Mount Auburn Cemetery is open to visitors free of charge every day from 8:00 am to 7:00 pm.

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    Longfellow National Historic Site

    by Jefie Written Jun 6, 2008

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    Longfellow National Historic Site
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    For almost 50 years, this beautiful Colonial mansion was the home of American poet Henry Wadsworth Longfellow. Longfellow first boarded there in 1837, and he later received the house as a wedding present in 1843. He was to live there until his death in 1882, and there he wrote some of his most famous poems, including "Paul Revere's Ride", "Tales of a Wayside Inn", and "The Village Blacksmith". Another interesting fact about the house is that it once served as headquarters for George Washington and fellow American revolutionaries during the Siege of Boston.

    A tour of the house takes you through most of the rooms on the first and second floors, including the study where Longfellow worked, the magnificient library (he was proficient in several languages so you'll see books from all over the world), and the room where both Longfellow and his wife died. Our tour guide was quite knowledgeable and supported the different stories he related with bits and pieces from Longfellow's poems and letters. He made us feel very comfortable walking around this historic mansion so that by the time we left, it felt like we had dropped in on a friend who happened to be away from home.

    During summer, tours are offered at 10:30 am, 11:30 am, 1:00 pm, 2:00 pm, 3:00 pm and 4:00 pm, from Wednesday to Sunday. Admission is only $3. The beautiful grounds and gardens are open to the public free of charge.

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    Cambridge Common

    by Jefie Updated Jun 1, 2008

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    Although it is much smaller and perhaps less popular and attractive than its Boston counterpart, Cambridge Common does have at least one interesting feature: from 1775 to 1776, it was the site of General George Washington's main military camp and according to legend, he took command of the Continental army under an elm tree that grew on Cambridge Common. Although the tree no longer exists, a new one was planted near a stone that commemorates the event.

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    THE MUSEUM OF SCIENCE

    by Rich62 Updated May 27, 2008
    CARL YASTREMSKI at the Museum of Science

    ALTHOUGH WE DID NOT ACTUALLY GET TO GO THROUGH THE MUSEUM OF SCIENCE, WE GOT A BIT OF A LOOK SINCE THAT IS WHERE THE DUCK BOAT TOURS BEGIN. It certainly appears to be a first class operation.

    I don't exactly know what the connection would be between the great Red Sox player Carl Yastremski (did I spell that right?) and science, but nevertheless this great action statue can be found at the museum.

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    TAKE A DUCK BOAT TOUR

    by Rich62 Written May 26, 2008
    DUCK BOATS ON LAND AND WATER

    THE DUCK BOATS ARE A GREAT TOUR OF BOSTON, BUT THEY START IN CAMBRIDGE at the Museum of Science shown in the background of my photo. The water portion of the tour is in the Charles River, which is the southern boundry of Cambridge.

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    Mt Auburn Cemetery

    by sarahandgareth Written Mar 24, 2008

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    Mt. Auburn Cemetery

    Sounds a bit morbid, we know, but Mt Auburn Cemetery really is an incredible site! Opened in 1831, Mt Auburn is one of the oldest privately owned cemeteries in the country. The grounds have an amazing setting with rolling hills, dells, and many ponds. And the trees are incredible, both the size and the sheer number of them! We particularly enjoyed the walk up to the Tower and the great view of Boston and Cambridge from the top!

    When you come in through the Egyptian Revival Gateway be sure to pick up a map, walking tour booklet, big tree guide or whatever other literature suits your fancy in the West Alcove. While there, you can also see what bird and blooming plants have recently been seen throughout the grounds.

    We highly recommend walking through the grounds. Although you are allowed to drive on the majority of the roads, you will get a much better feel for the history and serenity of the place on foot. Plus, paths to some of the more memorable parts of the cemetery are accessible only by foot. (Keep in mind, however, that running, biking, and picnics are not allowed and that this is still an active cemetery so it is important to be respectful of funeral parties, if you come across one.)

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  • into music

    by sommersettivy Written Jul 20, 2007

    definately go to harvard square in the summer time. You will hear music from the main stop in Cambridge. People will beplaying there, and then on Mass Ave you will have the Cantab Lounge, the Lizard Lounge which is a hip little place to go and also the club passim. Club Passim is located on the street across from MAss Ave, i dont' remember, but they do a lot of music from all around the US. They hold festivals in may and on labor day weekend.

    Cambridge is such a beautiful place, i walked all around harvard square and the park it was beautiful.

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    Harvard Square

    by SullyBiz Updated Jan 17, 2007

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    Harvard Square is a great place to spend a sunny afternoon. I like to head over there on sundays just to meet up with friends and drink coffee while the street performers put on their shows. It's a great place just to take a walk, grab some lunch/dinner, and take in the diversity.

    Walk through Harvard Yard or just lounge on the grass like everyone else. You can walk by the Charles too and see the crew teams rowing. Get some shopping done and check out some of the more interesting little stores (I personally prefer Harvard Sq to Newbury St for shopping.) You'll also find a great variety of restaurants with all types of food and atmospheres. Between cafes, chain resaurants, bars and bistros, I think you'll be all set for food and drink.

    I buy jewelry at a little store on Mass. Ave called "A Taste of Culture." The founder is from Peru and the store features unique clothing, unusual gifts, pottery, tapestries, etc. from all over the world. They have the sweetest staff and every time I leave it's with a promise to be back.

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  • Restaurants in Harvard Square

    by squarelunchguy Written Dec 21, 2006

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    There are over 80 restaurants in Harvard Square, and I've eaten at all of them! You can see my website for the ful list and reviews of each.

    That said, here are some restaurant suggestions:

    If you're looking for the best food, prices be damned:
    Om Restaurant and Upstairs on the Square on Winthrop Street - high end.
    Bartley's Burgers - best burgers in the world - on Mass Ave toward Central five blocks.
    Veggie Planet - creative vegetarian - corner of Church St. and Palmer Street

    Best Restaurants to meet others:
    Bartley's, sit in the middle area
    Grafton Street, large lounge
    Fire and Ice, Church Street, around the grill

    Best Value (cheapest)
    Fellipe's on Mt. Auburn - $3 burrito!
    All four Indian restaurants - all you can eat buffet

    Most unusual restaurants
    Grendel's (Supreme Court history)
    Upstairs at the Square (former Harvard theatrical club)
    Coop Cafe - in the middle of the bookstore
    Bartley's - nothing like it
    Cafe Pamplona (when it's nice) - takes you to Spain
    Veggie Planet - only in Harvard Square
    Plough and Stars - 15 minute walk for an authentic irish pub
    Om - sylistized Tibetan(!)

    Check out my blog for more info on each of these!

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    Harvard

    by Carmanah Updated Oct 29, 2006

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    The Harvard crest draped over the Widener Library.
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    Harvard is probably the first thing most people think of when they think if Cambridge, Massachutsetts, for Harvard is the oldest, most prestigious and most famous university in the entire USA.

    Located in the heart of Cambridge, the Harvard campus is one of the most beautiful university campuses I've seen. A brick wall surrounds most of the campus and there are several gates in which you can enter. If you can, take a walking tour of the university. It's well worth it. The guides are all students and will give you a lot of insider secret's on the history of the campus.

    For example, we learned that the Harvard library is the oldest in the United States and the largest academic library in the world. Because of heritage building laws in Massachusetts, historical buildings such as the Widener Memorial library cannot have its exterior modified. Because they couldn't build onto the existing building, they expanded the library by adding more floors underground.

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  • jelw's Profile Photo

    Of Cambridge, Harvard and the Squares

    by jelw Written Oct 27, 2006

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    Harvard Square
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    Strolling through Cambridge is fascinating. History and culture with some difinitive funk mixed in, abound in the various squares.
    Take your time here, there is somethinng for everyone; cafes, street artists, architecture and a bit of brilliance.

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    The Museum of Useful Things (MUT)

    by frankcanfly Updated Sep 24, 2006

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    The Museum
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    I read about this place before my last visit to Cambridge, and thought I'd check it out. The website made me more excited to see it; I like simple and obscure history.

    Then I found it. It's a store. Granted, some of the things for sale are interesting, and highly overpriced.

    When I asked someone where the museum is, he pointed to a shelf behind the cashier and said 'There's some vintage stuff there." OK, got it.

    Summary: If you're walking by and you just step in, you'll think it's an interesting store. If you're looking for an interesting museum, you'll have to settle for an expensive, over-hyped store.

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  • KarenandCory's Profile Photo

    PORTER SQUARE

    by KarenandCory Updated Aug 8, 2006

    Porter Square is the area of Cambridge between Harvard Square and Davis Square. It's right on the border of Somerville.
    Porter Square's most visible landmark is a 46-foot stainless steel kinetic sculpture by Susumu Shingu, entitled "Gift of the Wind." Its huge red wings are designed to shift in response to the movement of the wind, not only turning clockwise and counter clockwise, but tumbling over and over in various sequences.
    Another prominent feature of the skyline is the tower on the Porter Exchange mall, once a Sears-Roebuck department store, and now a collection of many (mostly Japanese) small shops, the Lesley University bookstore, and the Harvard-Smithsonian center for astrophysics.
    Lots of restaurants and stores.

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  • Tom_Fields's Profile Photo

    Harvard University

    by Tom_Fields Updated Feb 25, 2006
    The Administration Building
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    Harvard was founded in 1636, in Newetowne. Shortly afterward, it was renamed Cambridge (after the one in England). This is the oldest institution of higher learning in America. It has a beautiful campus, open the the public.

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    Strolling about Cambridge

    by Tom_Fields Written Feb 25, 2006
    One of Cambridge's parks
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    Cambridge is a great walking town. People are accustomed to pedestrians and cycllists. It offers excellent views of Boston, which is on the opposite side of the Back Bay. It also has some fine parks.

    On April 18, 1775, during the Revolution, American patriots confronted British redcoats in a skirmish in Cambridge; four of them were killed. The action occurred at the corner of Massachusetts and Rindge Avenues.

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Cambridge Things to Do

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