Fun things to do in Plymouth

  • Pilgrims Memorial State Park
    Pilgrims Memorial State Park
    by Jim_Eliason
  • Pilgrims Memorial State Park
    Pilgrims Memorial State Park
    by Jim_Eliason
  • Pilgrims Memorial State Park
    Pilgrims Memorial State Park
    by Jim_Eliason

Most Viewed Things to Do in Plymouth

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    Back to 1627 in Plimouth

    by grandmaR Updated May 18, 2007

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    Some years ago - not in the 17th century, but in the 1970s - I visited Plimouth Plantation with my two oldest children. [Calling something in Massachusetts a "Plantation" seems like a bit of an anachronism.] It doesn't look significantly different now from the way it was in the 1970s - at least going by the website. The pictures that I took were slides which have been digitized.

    What it is -- the reconstruction of the original settlement of the Plymouth Colony established by the Pilgrims which was started in 1947 by Henry Hornblower II, a Boston stockbroker and amateur archaeologist. It was expanded to today's fortified village by the 1950s. In this section of the museum, interpreters have been trained to speak, act, and dress appropriately for the period. The village approximates the assumed layout of the original

    Plimoth Plantation is open March 24 through November 25, 7 days a week.
    * The Plimoth Plantation location is 3 miles south of downtown Plymouth

    Hours of Plimoth Plantation:
    * Henry Hornblower II Visitor Center is open from 9:00 am to 5:30 pm.
    * Exhibit in the Visitor Center: Thanksgiving: Memory, Myth & Meaning is open from 9:00 am to 5:00 pm.
    * Crafts Center is open from 9:15 am to 5:00 pm
    * 1627 English Village is open from 9:30 am to 5:00 pm
    * the Wampanoag Homesite is open from 9:30 am to 5:00 pm
    * Nye Barn is open from 9:30 am to 5:00 pm
    Visiting the Wampanoag Homesite, the 1627 English Village, the Crafts Center, and the Nye Barn requires at least a mile of walking over uneven terrain

    Tickets to the Plimouth Plantation only:
    Adults $21.00
    Children (6-12) $12.00
    Seniors $19.00

    Combination tickets that include the Mayflower II are also available

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    • Historical Travel

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    Relive the Mayflower Days

    by cruisingbug Updated Apr 1, 2006

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    Plimoth Plantation is a re-creation of the year 1627 in Plymouth, Massachusetts, seven years after the Pilgrims landed on Plymouth Rock. As you enter the colony, you encounter "locals" going about their daily lives. Other than watching them and checking out the village, the main attraction and key to having a good time here is talking to these historical re-enacters about their "lives." For instance, we ducked into one of the houses to give the baby a quick meal and diaper ("tailcloth") change. None of the role players were there, so we figured tourists wouldn't come knocking much either (they did but didn't linger). Anyway, one of the "locals" entered and we excused ourselves for using his home - then proceeded to have a nice conversation about family life with who we later figured out was none other than "John Alden" of the famous John-Priscilla-Myles Standish love triangle. One of the first houses we entered belonged to "Edward Winslow" and his wife - we spoke with them a while and enjoyed their fire (it was in the 40s outside). Later I deduced that his "wife" was playing the former Susanna White - my great-great-great-etc. grandmother. I went back to ask her some more questions but she must have been on a break! Oh well.

    Also on site are a crafts center (woodworking, pottery, etc.), the Wampanoag Homesite (modern Native People demonstrating and talking about their heritage and lives) and indoor exhibits at the main entrance building. A great time to visit would be around Thanksgiving! Admission is $21 - $24 if you get the combo pass that also covers the Mayflower II.

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    Gotta See the Rock!

    by cruisingbug Written Apr 3, 2006

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    If you're in Plymouth, Plymouth Rock is a can't miss. Maybe it's the real rock the Pilgrims first set foot on, maybe not. Either way, the sentiment is there - this is where it all began! Actually, Plymouth wasn't the first settlement in America - St. Augustine was founded in 1565 by Spain, Jamestown, Virginia was settled in 1607, and Quebec is Canada's oldest city, founded in 1608. Plymouth was, though, the first permanent settlement in New England - by mistake, as the Pilgrims were headed for Virginia.

    The rock itself is housed in an open Greek-temple-looking portico and surrounded by an iron fence. Viewing is from above. Two-thirds of the rock are beneath the beach, so only the top third is visible. The current rock is about half its original size as it accidentally broke while being moved in 1774, and because so many souvenir seekers had chipped away at it over time.

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    Plymouth Grist Mill

    by CEP1863 Written Nov 5, 2013

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    The mill is run by the Plymouth Plantation and is a short walk from the waterfront via the Brewster Gardens. It is not the original building but a reproduction of the original however it is a working mill and if you visit on a Friday or Saturday you can see the mill actually working. It is advisable to call in advance to check if the mill is working and at what time. Entry into the mill is by guided tour only. The guide was very knowledgeable and clearly had a real love for the mill and a passion for the history of the place, she really brought the mill to life.

    Overall I found the visit to be interesting. If you have never been to a mill from this period or seen a mill working then I would recommend this as something well worth doing.

    The mill is open daily from 09:00am to 05:00pm. Entrance is $6 and tours are run regularly throughout the day.

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    The costume of the day

    by Pawtuxet Written Aug 17, 2004

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    This costumed guide had to be suffering with the heat that day. She told of her work day which consisted of gardening and cooking. Sometimes she had to work on sewing or making small items for the household. She was on her way back to the garden with all these layers of clothes on, which she said was her SUMMER clothes. She was an excellent guide....knowledgeable and quite engaging.

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    Children experience a different time

    by Pawtuxet Written Sep 30, 2004

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    Do you suppose the kids who come here have ever chased a chicken down a dirt lane? I doubt it. This is a wonderful way to teach kids about history. Especially if they are studying the era in school at the time. I highly recommend bringing the kids. There are video/audio exhibits in the main building, there is a craft center where you can watch and question the people working there...as well as the actual village area. Many opportunities to really dig in and get the feel of the times in Plymouth.

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    Brother & Sister in the New World

    by Pawtuxet Written Aug 17, 2004

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    The costumed guides at Plimoth Plantation are very good. They never vary from their character or time period. This brother and sister told of their lives in the colony...and what they missed most about home. It was such a hard life for them. The brother was finding it more bitter than the sister. The days were spent worrying about survival...with no time for play or rest. They enjoy their lunch before returning to the work of the day.

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    The statue of Massasoit

    by gosiaPL Written Sep 4, 2006

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    If you're too preoccupied with the Plymouth Rock, you may miss this sweet statue of Massasoit on the hill almost opposite the Rock. He is standing alone there overlooking the Plymouth harbor... Massasoit was Chief of the Wampanoag Indians who helped the the European newcomers survive the first winter (the Pilgrim Fathers landed in Northern America in December 1620) and then taught them to grow corn and make flour of it.

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    Plymouth Waterfront

    by Pawtuxet Written Oct 12, 2003

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    The waterfront has a sidewalk and stone wall right up to the street...so that it is easy to take a leisurely walk and look at the ocean. There are many pleasure boats, fishing boats, and tour boats available for summer fun....or the amateur photographer. You can go to the top of a little hill to see the Wax Museum, a couple of monuments and an awesome view of the harbour. Lots of B&B's and apartments for summer vacations...as well as an interesting little business district that has lots of good shops, antiques, coffee cafes, and restaurants....pubs.

    Related to:
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    • Sailing and Boating
    • Historical Travel

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  • Whale Watching

    by Tryla Updated Oct 3, 2003

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    Plymouth Harbor is home port to many popular excursions including whale watches.

    Captain John's Boats offer a 4 hour whale wathing adventure. As they depart historic Plymouth Harbor, your naturalist, a professional marine biologist, provides an informative description of the whales you are likely to see off of Cape Cod, as well as commentary on the day's whale watching activities, and is available to answer any questions you may have about whales. This program has proven to be of such outstanding educational value that it now serves as part of the science curriculum in many Massachusett's and New England schools.
    Enjoy the cruise across Cape Cod Bay on one of two open decks or lounge in the climate controlled main cabin. Your comfort is assured and complete galley service, offering your favorite food and beverages, is available.

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    Plimoth Plantation: 1627 Pilgrim Village

    by gosiaPL Updated Sep 4, 2006

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    Surely this village is a must in the historical Plymouth! It is an oustanding reproduction of the first settlers' village which was originally located in present-day Plymouth. As you enter the village, you will pass through the gathering building, be sure to climb the upper floor for an overview of the whole village, it's worth it! Just don't try to fire those cannons that sit there :-)
    In the village there are costumed guides all over the place "living" their 1627's lives: cooking meals, doing their gardens and housework, etc. It really feels like you are literally taken back in time to the 1600's. Be sure to talk to them and ask them questions, they will be behaving and responding with their 1627's identities, they've gone through special training to do this. Try asking them a question related to any time later than the 1600's and see if you can catch them forget their 1627's identity :-)

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    • Arts and Culture
    • Historical Travel

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  • Plimoth Plantation

    by Tryla Updated Oct 3, 2003

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    Plimoth Plantation, a living museum of life in Plymouth the way it was in 1627, is a popular, national attraction. Here, visitors can interact with the inhabitants who have assumed the identity of early Plymouth Pilgrims.

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    Brewster Gardens - a haven of peace

    by CEP1863 Written Nov 11, 2013

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    Very close to Plymouth Rock and on the way to the Grist Mill, these gardens are a peaceful haven away from the hustle and bustle. The gardens are very well tended and there are plenty of benches to sit and savour both the gardens and the brook that runs through. There are a couple of really nice statues located here, one honouring the female pilgrims and the second honouring Plymouths immigrant settlers over the last 300 or so years. The gardens are a great place to stop and rest in between the main sights that Plymouth has to offer.

    Related to:
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    • Women's Travel

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    explore the Plantation

    by garcom01 Written Apr 15, 2008

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    One of my favorite places in Plymouth is the old Plimouth Plantation, a re-creation of 1600's Plimouth{old spelling}. It is about a mile or so south of the town center, on rt 3a. It does a good job of explaining what life was like for the early settlers, and {this they didn't have when I 1st came here 30 yrs ago, as a kid} the native americans. There are actors in period clothing, inter-active activities, and multimedia presentations. It may seem a little corny, but it is very interesting.
    Also, the Pilgrim Museum downtown is being expanded, should open this summer.
    Try the clams at Wood's or the Cabby Shack, both on the town wharf

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    Plimoth Plantation: Thanksgiving exhibit

    by gosiaPL Written Sep 4, 2006

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    Before you tour the recreated Pilgrim Village, I suggest you stop at the Visitor's Centre. There is an ongoing multi-media ehxibition Thanksgiving: Memory Myth & Meaning which gives you the full story behind this original American holiday. It started as a harvest celebration between the first colonists and the Wampanoag Indians. Now it is often referred to as the First Thanksgiving but, as you can see, it had nothing to do with eating turkey with cranberry sauce :-)
    I really enjoyed this major exhibition also because it gives a lot of info about the Wampanoag Indians.

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Plymouth Things to Do

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