Salem Things to Do

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Most Recent Things to Do in Salem

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    Witch House

    by Jim_Eliason Written May 10, 2011

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    The only surviving structure in town directly related to the Witch trials is the home of judge Jonathan Corwin one of the judges in the trials. Although misnamed this is one of the more authentic attractions.

    Witch House
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  • cjg1's Profile Photo

    Ye Old Pepper Company

    by cjg1 Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    This candy store is heralded as America's Oldest Candy Company. The candy store has a variety of old fashioned candies such as the Salem Gibralter. It's hard to walk by without stoping in...the smell of candy and chocolates lures you in.

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  • moiraistyx's Profile Photo

    Peabody Essex Museum-The New Museum

    by moiraistyx Updated Apr 4, 2011

    Posting General Information for now-full review later

    Open Tuesday-Sunday and holiday Mondays, 10 am-5 pm.
    Closed Thanksgiving, Christmas and New Year’s Day.

    Adults $15, Seniors $13, Students $11
    Youth (16 and under) and Salem, Mass. residents admitted free.
    Members admitted free to all sites

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  • BruceDunning's Profile Photo

    Parks Service Harbor Tours

    by BruceDunning Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    The National Parks Service has control of a large are along the harbor, and tours includes The Friendship sailing ship, the Derby and Narbonne Houses, and the Custom House. All of these are well worth the time and the tours are very informative. Fees are $5 for each tour and seniors pay $3. One covers the Freedom and Custom HOuse, while the other is for Derby and Narbonne houses. The Ranger said that on occasions during the summer, they take people out on additional one hour tours on the tall ship.
    Salem was a shipbuilding town from mid 1600's and that continued to early 1800's. They became known for junckets around the world to purchase goods, a lot of them exotic and luxury items. In early 1700's, and lasting to 1830's range, overseas trading made a few merchants the most wealthy in America. Elias Derby was one of those, but also William Gray who owned 181 vessels, and Simon Forester were three more prominent

    Map Layout of the harbor tours Friendship information Times and tour info Oirentation Center to start the tours Custom House across from Rec Center
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  • BruceDunning's Profile Photo

    Derby & Narbonne Houses

    by BruceDunning Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    The Derby HOuse was the most elegant in Salem and Elias Derby was a millionare, maybe the first in the US, and made a lot of money from the Revolutionary War taking a share of British goods they pirated. He showed off the wealth by having a brick home and furnishings from around the world. He took over dad's merchant shipping business in 1783 at age 44, and had 7 children. The fleet was once 13 vessels; fleet of went around the world. His son took over in 1799 when dad died, but he ran the business in the ground and the family became destitute, with many negative debts. Through the years the home was sold and ended up with donation to Parks Service in 1937. A lot of thew wharfs had been filled in with dirt by then. In the heh day, they had one merchant ship a day go out to buy goods. The captains kept 10-20% of the goods, and could also buy for his own account. Park Service got a lot of original pieces donated by the Derby family heirs
    Narbonne house was from around 1640, as a first meat butcher shop on the retail row. Later is was a dry goods store, and a dress/sewing shop (sisters lived here 65 yrs-and passed down to relatives) Numerous additions were made and some taken back down over the years. Last heir occupants lived here until 1973, then the Park Service got the donation

    View of Derby home Original clock-as well as many other items Rear of Narbonne house Kitchen of the Narbonne house
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  • BruceDunning's Profile Photo

    Friendship TAll Ship

    by BruceDunning Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Thee type ships were in use mid 1700's through early 1800's. Then steam ships and Clipper ships took the activity. The original Friendship was build in 1796, and sailed 15 voyages until it was captured by the British in 1812, and later sold in England. This is a replica build in 1996 for millions-said the Ranger. It goes out on the water 6-7 times a years and makes tall ship tours. FActs are it is 342 tons, 171 feet in length and has 5 miles of rigging ropes. They would have 24 people on board and stay out for 1-6 months. They went around the world. In the Revolutionary War there were 158 privateer ships raiding British ships, and they kept 10-20% of goods on board. Merchants got wealthy, and took over 445 British ships. The harbor at one time had 50 wharfs and only 3 are now left. The rest are filled in.

    Stern view of the ship Boew view of ship View in harbor On board View Close up of the front
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  • BruceDunning's Profile Photo

    Customn HOuse on the wharf

    by BruceDunning Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    This Custom House was first started construction in 1819. It took 50 years to complete, and by that time is was really not needed. The purpose originally was to compete as a major port having a merchant ship a day some into port. The main, and maybe sole source of Federal Government revenue was taxing import goods. In 1820, it was $17 million collected and represented 85% of revenue to support the country. Salem and shipping was dying, and by 1830's it was a a rapid decline. By 1850's, Salem was of lesser importance. Scales were taken out to the ships and goods were weighed and taxed. A typical tall ship could carry 3,000 tons and it would generate $18,000 taxes. Nathaniel Hawthorne had the prominent role of scale manager, until he fell out with the elite in the community over issues. He later belittled the Custom HOuse in his book. The eagle in the house is from 1826 and was brown until 1873, when gilded gold. Later it was taken down and a replica was put up to preserve the original

    View of house Frontal view of Custom HOuse EAgle that was on the cupola
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  • KittyLou's Profile Photo

    Nathaniel Hathorne House

    by KittyLou Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Originally located a few blocks away on Union Street the building was moved in 1958 because it is the house in which Nathaniel Hawthorne was born on July 4th 1804 .
    The house of part of the House of Seven Gables tour.

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  • Jefie's Profile Photo

    Witch Trials Memorial

    by Jefie Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Dedicated in 1992, 300 years after the Salem witch trials, this simple but moving memorial commemorates the life and death of the innocent men and women who died as a result of the witchcraft histeria that took hold of the city in its early Puritan beginnings. The memorial is located just outside of The Burying Point, the oldest burying ground in the city of Salem, where lie some of the judges in the Witchcraft trials.

    Giles Corey, one of the victims of the Salem witch Witch trials memorial Witch trials memorial
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  • kazander's Profile Photo

    Witch Dungeon Museum

    by kazander Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    The Witch Dungeon Museum does a live reenactment of the 1892 Witch trials in Salem. The line (like the Witch museum across town) is very, very long. It gives basically the same story, so you may not want to do both in one day. The lines take up a lot of time, I suppose it would depend on how long you are planning to stay in town. This does have the benefit of having real actors instead of light up dioramas, but I would not suggest to bypass the other museum, silmpy because it is a Salem landmark. It would be almost like going to Yellowstone and not seeing Old faithful, or London without seeing Big Ben. Might not be the highlight of your trip, but still you have to do it. Anyway, long story short, stop by here if you have some extra time.....

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  • RhondaRuth's Profile Photo

    Hollywood House of Wax

    by RhondaRuth Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Here you will find all of your favorite movie stars and monsters from supernatural Hollywood.

    Nobody celebrates Halloween quite like Salem, Massachusetts. Whether you are seeking Haunted Houses or unique and spooktacular gifts, Salem is the destination for October fun!

    Ain't that the truth?

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  • gosiaPL's Profile Photo

    The New England Pirate Museum

    by gosiaPL Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    I'm not sure how many pirate museums there are in the world, but this one certainly commemorates 17th century's sea-robbers of New England. I didn't visit it, I discovered it when I was leaving Salem and only took this picture. Check some more here - that's how easily you can spot the building, it really catches the eye :-)

    I imagine it must be fun for kids! Apparently the museum offers an up to 30 minutes' tour among authentic pirate treasures, a walk in recreated dockside village, boarding a pirate ship, exploring a cave with hidden treasures, etc. Check some more info here - don't make my mistake of assuming that Salem is only all about the 'witches' :-]

    Tickets are at $6 ($4 for children). Or choose a Combination Ticket with the Witch Dungeon Museum and the Witch History Museum.

    Pirate Museum
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  • RhondaRuth's Profile Photo

    The New England Pirate Museum

    by RhondaRuth Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Pirates, and not accused witches, were the real rascals and villains of 1692 in Olde Salem Towne.

    The little-known history of New England sea-robbers comes alive at the Pirate Museum. Notorious pirate captains, such as; Kidd, Blackbeard, Bellamy and Quelch, roamed the waters off Boston's North Shore, known as the Gold Coast . At the Museum relive the adventures of the pirates, who roamed freely offshore plundering merchant ships.

    Hours:
    -----------------------------------
    May through October...10am to 5pm
    Weekends in November
    Some nights during Haunted Happenings

    Prices:
    -----------------------------------
    Adults........................$6.00
    Children (4-13yrs)............$4.00
    Seniors.......................$5.00

    Group Rates Available upon request

    Combination Ticket available with the Witch Dungeon Museum, Witch History Museum and the New England Pirate Museum.

    Pirate Museum
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  • Tracyden's Profile Photo

    The house of seven gables

    by Tracyden Written Mar 25, 2011

    The inspiration for the historical novel. You can visit and tour the house. It's right by the sea - very pretty. If you don't want to pay the entrance fee you can still get a good photo of the house if you walk down to the bottom of Turner Street. There are also lots of other pretty houses to see on Turner Street.

    The entry fee is not the cheapest at $12.50 per adult.

    The house
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    Witch museum

    by Tracyden Written Mar 25, 2011

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    Open all year round - or partially open. We had free entry as not all of the museum was open. We were lucky enough to have a personal guide - a lovely student with curly ginger hair who was very passionate about the subject of fear leading to intolerance.

    There are displays of societies traditional images of witches - herbs, historical timelines and a model of modern day Wiccans.

    Thhe museum has a shop that sells witchy related things and also items related to the local area.

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