Dearborn Things to Do

  • A CLASSIC 39 FORD TUDOR.. I OWNED ONE OF THESE..
    A CLASSIC 39 FORD TUDOR.. I OWNED ONE OF...
    by DennyP
  • CHECK OUT THE SPECIALLY BUILT WIENER MOBILE..
    CHECK OUT THE SPECIALLY BUILT WIENER...
    by DennyP
  • HAVE A BURGER OR SNACK IN THIS  50's STYLE DINER
    HAVE A BURGER OR SNACK IN THIS 50's...
    by DennyP

Best Rated Things to Do in Dearborn

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    Presidential Limousines

    by Yaqui Written Feb 17, 2013

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    Reagan Presidential Limousine 1972
    On March 30, 1981, Ronald Reagan took refuge in this limousine's interior to escape would-be assassin John Hinkley's gunfire. Going into service under President Nixon, it is also the car in which President Ford was riding when an attempt was made on his life. This is the last presidential limousine that will be preserved. All presidential cars are now destroyed by the Secret Service for security reasons.

    Kennedy Presidential Limousine 1961
    This is the limousine in which President John F. Kennedy was assassinated that day in Dallas, November 22, 1963.

    Franklin D. Roosevelt Sunshine Special 1939
    The Sunshine Special was widely used before and during World War II to chauffeur President Roosevelt in countless public appearances. It began a more-than-50-year run of Lincolns as the "official" White House limousines.

    Theodore Roosevelt Horse-drawn Brougham 1902
    This brougham was used by President Theodore Roosevelt on all official occasions. During the administrations of Taft and Wilson, automobiles came into vogue and the brougham was used by the White House housekeeping department for marketing and other errands.

    The last coachman for this vehicle was an African American named Daniel Webster. Webster served as White House coachman from 1913 to 1928, and subsequently as chauffeur for the Model A Ford that finally replaced the brougham.

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    1939 Douglas DC-3

    by Yaqui Written Feb 17, 2013

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    Dimensions:
    Length: 64' 6";
    Wingspan: 95'
    Weight (empty): 15,800 lbs.

    Construction Materials: Aluminum, fabric on ailerons, elevators and rudder
    Builder: Douglas Aircraft Company, Santa Monica, California
    Cost: $110,000 new; $35,000 when bought by North Central Airlines in 1952
    Number Built: 10,926 in U.S. (10,123 military, 803 civilian); about 3,500 additional Japanese and Soviet versions
    Engine Type: Two Wright Cyclone, 9-cylinder, 1,000-horsepower, radial, air-cooled internal combustion engines
    Engine Builder: Wright Aeronautical Company, Patterson, New Jersey
    Configuration: 1-pilot/21-passenger tractor monoplane
    Maximum Speed: 190 m.p.h.

    Flying into the Record Books
    As an airliner for Eastern Airlines and North Central Airlines, this DC-3:

    Flew more than 12 million miles in 83,032 hours
    Used 550 main gear tires and 25,000 spark plugs
    Wore out 136 engines
    Consumed almost 9 million gallons of gasoline
    Taxied over 100,000 miles
    Flew an additional 1,843 hours after being refitted as a corporate plane
    When it was donated to the Museum in 1975, it had spent more time aloft than any other airplane in history. That record has since been broken by another DC-3.

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    Greenfield Village

    by Yaqui Updated Feb 17, 2013

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    Make some time to stroll down main street and encounter a bustling place of automobiles and carriages, events and amusements. Discover the center of community and commerce from the J. R. Jones General Store and Mrs. Cohen's Millinery to the Logan County Courthouse brimming with American history and heritage.

    Places to visit in this district:
    Eagle Tavern
    Grimm Jewelry Store
    J.R. Jones General Store
    Logan County Courthouse
    Martha-Mary Chapel
    Phoenixville Post Office
    Town Hall
    Wright Cycle Shop

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    Ford Rouge Factory Tour

    by Yaqui Written Feb 17, 2013

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    Ford Rouge Factory Tour is a wonderful self-guided five-part tour that includes: Legacy Theater ( triumphs and tragedies surrounding the Rouge), Art of Manufacturing Theater( multi-sensory theater experience including a 360-degree look at how automobiles are made), Observation Deck (World’s largest living roof from our 80-foot-high), Dearborn Truck Plant (See where the new Ford F-150s are assembled in a new lean and flexible manufacturing plant) and the Legacy Gallery (View five historic vehicles made at the Rouge including the 20,000,000th Ford).

    Theater seating is limited to 79 guests per show; shows run continuously until 4:00 PM and are seated on a first come first serve basis.

    Photography and video recording are strictly prohibited in both theaters and the Dearborn Truck Plant. Photography is allowed in the Legacy Gallery and Observation Deck..

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    Hero's of the Sky~Wright Flyer

    by Yaqui Updated Feb 20, 2013

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    1903 Wright Flyer Dimensions:
    Length = 21' 1"
    Wingspan = 40' 4"
    Weight (plane only) = 605 lbs.

    Its maximum speed was 9.9 mph, and the farthest it flew was 852 feet.
    Orville and Wilbur Wright built the original Wright Flyer at their bicycle shop in Dayton, Ohio, for approximately $1,000 of their own money. Their friend Charles Taylor, built the 12-horsepower engine.

    This Wright Flyer is the world's most accurate reproduction of the original 1903 Flyer. Just weeks before the Centennial of Flight celebration in December 2003, this Flyer made several successful flights at the Wright Brothers National Memorial in Kill Devil Hills, North Carolina.

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    Your Place in Time

    by Yaqui Updated Feb 20, 2013

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    This exhibit is dedicated to the experiences of 5 the generations by exploring the development of infrastructures and changes in technologies that continued throughout the century. Five modular walls, representing a chronological continuum include historical timelines, artifacts, and statistical charts.

    Progressive Generation~When being able to listen to a musical instrument such as a Victrola.

    War Generation~During the 1930s and '40s folks sat around listening to the radios for their local and worldly news. When Orson Welles' hair-raising broadcast of "War of the Worlds" scared half the country believing it was real, was proven proof the power of the radio.

    Silent Generation~ After the war, the 1950's American "teenagers" came of age listening to jukeboxes, Rock n' Roll music, and driving the family automobile.

    Baby Boomers TV~This generation came of age with television-in fact, it's even been called the TV Generation. This section is dedicated to the 1950s, 1960s and 1970s on authentic television sets of the era, and how TV itself matured as a technology along with the Boomers.

    Generation X of Education and Technology~ This generation of children grew up in the 1970s were perhaps the first to experience education through technology. Sesame Street to helped them grow by playing with electronic learning toys. Watch vintage 1970s educational TV and try out our trivia game.

    Next Generation ~Today's generation doesn't have a history yet, but the large numbers of this group are sure to dictate the technology trends of the future.

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    IMAX Theatre

    by Yaqui Written Feb 17, 2013

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    If you have time, try out their IMAX theatre. IMAX motion picture projection system, invented and developed by Imax Corporation, is the finest motion picture projection system in the world. Images of unsurpassed size, clarity, and impact, enhanced by a superb specially-designed six-channel, multi-speaker sound system, are projected onto our giant rectangular screen which is eight stories wide (84 feet) and six stories tall (62 feet). Our IMAX Theatre is the largest IMAX Theatre in the State of Michigan having the capability to show both 2D and 3D IMAX films. Seating capacity is 440 for 2D, 410 for 3D, and is fully handicapped accessible in accordance with ADA regulationshttp://www.thehenryford.org/imax/about.aspx.

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    Driving America

    by Yaqui Updated Feb 20, 2013

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    Centered around an unparalleled collection of historically significant vehicles, this remarkable mix of authentic artifacts, digital media, interactive play and personal accounts focuses on the enormous influence the automobile has had on American culture—from the automotive innovations that have changed our lives to the everyday choices we make.

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    Railroad Junction

    by Yaqui Written Feb 17, 2013

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    The steam-powered rail line and an 1800s small-town train depot take you inside the great history of railroading, paired with the chance to investigate the only working late 19th-century roundhouse in the Midwest.

    Places to visit in this district: Detroit, Toledo & Milwaukee Roundhouse, Edison Illuminating, Company's Station A, Smiths Creek Depot

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    Automobile in American Life~McDonald's Sign

    by Yaqui Updated Feb 17, 2013

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    Standing 26 feet high, this neon sign was installed in August 1960 at the second McDonald's franchise in Michigan.It reads "Licensee of the McDonal's speedee Service System-Hamburgers Over Million Sold."

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    Liberty & Jutice for All

    by Yaqui Written Feb 17, 2013

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    With Liberty and Justice for All exhibits focuses upon four key transformative moments in the American quest for freedom: the Revolutionary Era, the Antislavery Movement and Civil War Era, the Woman’s Suffrage Movement and the Civil Rights Movement. It highlights the people and iconic artifacts that were involved in those moments, and involves visitors in the important debates and struggles. Freedom in America has always been the product of social movements and struggle.

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    Dymaxion House

    by Yaqui Written Feb 17, 2013

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    The visionary architecture of R. Buckminster Fuller. Take a personal tour through "the house of the future." This extraordinary dwelling was designed to be the strongest, lightest and most cost-effective housing ever built. Restored to its original 1946 condition, its the only remaining prototype in the world.

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    Made in America~Gothic Steam Engine

    by Yaqui Updated Feb 17, 2013

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    Installed at the Tatham Brothers Lead Works in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, this 30 foot tall 50 ton engine drove machinery used to make lead products such as pipe and sheet flashing. It operated from 1857 until 1930, when it was donated to the museum by John T. Lewis & Co. It has a very ornated design.

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    Greenfield Village

    by truesunn Updated Jun 14, 2003

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    Model T Rides by Carrie Ann Seal

    Greenfield Village displays historical homes, furniture and costumes. Ride the steam locomotive around the park for a scenic, audio tour of the many historial homes and buildings including Henry Ford's home.

    Costumed attendants provide a glimpse and commentary into the daily life of those that may have inhabited the homes during the era they were built in. There are also black power shoot tournaments and other cultural and historical events.

    In the 5th grade, my class and I had the opportunity to experience a typical school day in one of the one room school houses, where we wrote on slates with chalks and read from reproduced 1800's readers!

    Be sure to visit the adjacent Henry Ford Museum!

    ADMISSION:
    Adult $18.00
    Kid 5-12 $12.00
    Kid 0-4 FREE

    All vehicular rides are $1.50 including steamboat, locomotive, Model T and Carousel.

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    Greenfield Village(historic 19th-century areas)

    by davecallahan Updated Mar 29, 2007

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    Within Greenfield Village there are seven historic areas (districts) that represent how American went from town living to an industrial power.

    Each of the districts has homes and work places with "actor-volunteers" living and working as they would in historical accuracy to the period of that area.

    The Henry Ford area shows Ford's home and first workshop, a replica of the one-room schools of his time and has period furniture and artifacts for viewing (but do not touch).

    The Main Street area shows a 19th century town with shops and post office and tavern and courthouse and various town buildings of that period. Most of the buildings have several rooms open for viewing with actors portraying activities pertinent to the area.

    The Working Farm area is just what the name implies; a 19th century American farm with animals and machinery and farmer and his wife.

    The Railroad Junction area shows how important steam transportation was to the growth of America. You can see a depot and a roundhouse and several trains.

    The Historic Homes area shows homes that have been transplanted and rebuilt from their original sites around Michigan to their present place at Greenfield Village. There is a lot to see in this area and a lot of "period personalities" to talk to.

    The Thomas Edison area shows many of the things for which Edison was famous.
    The Liberty Craftsworks area has buildings the 19th century handicrafts still being practiced today.

    The experience is fantastic for kids of all ages. See the website below for information on how to get there and what the ticket costs are (not cheap, but worth it).

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Dearborn Things to Do

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